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BrettCo
02-09-2016, 04:13 AM
Hi everybody. I am new to the board and new to the world of ukuleles. I am excited to be here. I have a question for anybody that may be able to help:

I am looking for the best Tenor ukulele at the 300 dollar range max. If you could only buy one ukulele, and had 300, what would you buy? I have played acoustic guitar for 20 years, and I've been through the cheap guitars and no longer want to go that route with ukuleles. I know that 300 bucks is still basically entry level, but what would be the best I could do with it?

Lastly, I am looking for brand new. I was interested in the Islander MAT-4 tenor spalted maple, but if I should steer away, just let me know! Thanks so much everybody.

Brett

70sSanO
02-09-2016, 04:26 AM
I would go to the ukulele site and take a look at what they have. They are a great place to buy a ukulele and they have sound samples.

For example...

http://www.theukulelesite.com/koalana-tenor-kta-0010.html

John

Mivo
02-09-2016, 05:17 AM
Welcome to the UU forum, Brett, glad you joined this awesome community! :)

If you figure in shipping and set-up, and perhaps a case, you're probably looking in the $250 range for the instrument. I'm not a tenor person, or so it seems to turn out, but I like the Koalana that John linked to. I love the KoAloha sound, and it seems that their entry line (the Koalana sub-brand) is as close as you'll get to it. There is also the used market, like the Marketplace section here. This might be a good way to stretch the money you have available.

You did specify you want a brand new one, and I can relate, just wanted to mention the option because for US folks there are often amazing deals, which may bring a solid instrument in range. For brand new with setup, I'd really consider the laminate Koalana if you like the tone from the videos. To me it sounds better than cheap solid models, based on the clips.

Snargle
02-09-2016, 05:44 AM
Mim's Ukes (http://stores.ebay.com/Mims-Ukes)has a ton of nice instruments in your price range and her reputation is excellent. I haven't purchased from her yet, but I'm sure the day will come soon!

Lori
02-09-2016, 06:11 AM
The Islander (by Kanile'a) should be good.
If you can play it in person, it would be a good idea. Each uke will have differences in feel and playability, and you can only tell when you play it. You might look at the Flea and the Fluke. They come in different combinations (neck scale) and it will get you something to start on. Later, that can be your travel/ camping/ beach uke, since they are pretty durable. The Fluke body is bigger, and a little more guitar-like in sound. If you want a more uke-like sound, get a Flea with a tenor neck.
Welcome to UU!

–Lori

Still Water Weapons
02-09-2016, 06:15 AM
I have a Kala Spruce top spalted maple tenor. I got it from HMS, pretty sure it was just short of $300, I've been very happy with it. My .02:)

GNUF Kris
02-09-2016, 06:29 AM
I'd second talking to Mim from Mim's Ukes! She's THE BEST

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 07:14 AM
Thanks so much everyone! I'm loving the responses.
In addition to what you think is the best uke money can buy at a 300 dollar range (not including price of shipping, handling, or case), how direly important is getting a solid uke?

The one I like is the tenor Islander MAT-4 but it's laminate. Am I going to regret this down the line? I'm trying to avoid the "entry level" stamp as much as possible, but I also know this is a company that is also represented by a very popular uke company (one of the four k's). Would you feel comfortable with this one?

I'm reading everybody's responses so as much advice as you would like to offer, I'd love to hear it. And again, thank you so much. I can't wait to get started with this!

Rllink
02-09-2016, 07:49 AM
I think that if you go to Mim, Andrew, or any of the other retailers recommended on this forum, you will get some professional help, rather than random opinions. They are pretty trustworthy, and they aren't going to sell you something you will be unhappy with. The problem with just throwing it out, is that everyone has their own opinion, and many times the differ. Some people like laminates, others wouldn't have one. I have an opinion as well, but I'm not going to add to the confusion. Get professional help, and good luck.

Mivo
02-09-2016, 07:53 AM
Depending on where you live, a laminate can remove a lot of worrying and babysitting. No need to humidify it. If I didn't live in a location where a humidifier isn't necessary (I still check the hygrometer on many days...), I think I would only have laminated ukuleles. Like with solid wood, there are different types and quality levels of laminated ukuleles, and it isn't automatically inferior, at least (I feel) in this price range.

You probably know this from your guitar background already, but it was the thing I wanted to avoid and then ended up just accepting it: the desire to find the one right ukulele right off the bat and not ever wanting or needing anything else, didn't quite turn out to be realistic for me and a fair number of folks here. Whichever instrument you buy, playing it for a time will bring forth new desires, based on preferences you discover. It's really a journey. So from that perspective, you can't get it wrong. :)

Though perhaps the lesson there is to pay attention to the possible resell value. Knowing what I know now, my first four ukulele purchases would have been different, and I probably wouldn't have a custom tenor now (it is a great instrument, but the wrong size for me, at least at this time), but I wouldn't know that if I had not made these purchases. My KoAloha was a gamble, one I didn't except to work out, and yet it became the one purchase I'm the most happy about.

Anyway, as for laminate vs. solid, a solid instrument is likely to have a better resell value because of the belief that solid instruments sound better. My solid acacia tenor does not sound better than the laminate Koalana in the clip (was around $300), and my solid mahagony concert from Stagg does not sound better than some laminate concerts I heard. So based on my limited experience, solid vs. laminate should probably be decided on a comparison of individual instruments. But it is perception also that affects resell values of well, anything really.

Are you set on the tenor size? Planning to tune it re-entrant or linear with a low-g? :)

Edit: As R. wrote, a lot of this is opinion-based. All of it, really. A vendor typically has had more exposure, but they also don't know how your preferences will develop. There are a few people here who I learned seem to often share my views and tastes, so I value their input higher. Janeray is someone like that, and it was her opinion that tipped the scale when I squirmed about whether to buy the LN pineapple. And I know who I'd ask about baritones, if I ever wanted one. But that comes with hanging out here for a while, and still, only actually playing something will tell you what you like or dislike.

rappsy
02-09-2016, 07:55 AM
Add Mike at Uke Republic and Mike at Mainland Ukes to the list of fine dealers with great reputations. Mim and HMS are also seconded here.

There'll be lots of choices and they will sell you what you need, not what they want to sell.

Welcome and best wishes.

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 10:26 AM
This is all GREAT Info. I really appreciate it. So I think these are my final choices. I was wondering if anyone has any experience with any of them, and also which you would choose. I will base my decision off of your advice, because my ears deceive me online.

-islander MAT-4 laminate tenor - link: http://www.theukulelesite.com/islander-spalted-maple-tenor-mat-package-deal.html

-koalana tenor - link: http://www.theukulelesite.com/koalana-tenor-kta-0010.html
-kala tenor Ka-smht
link: http://www.theukulelesite.com/kala-smht-solid-mahogany-tenor.html

Thanks all! This will make my decision final :)

Lori
02-09-2016, 10:34 AM
I have many laminates, and some solid ukes. The higher end ones are solid, and I make sure they all get humidified (today we have 23% humidity). I don't think you can tell the good laminate ukes from the solid wood ukes in the same price range. There are many other factors that affect the sound and that is only one piece of the puzzle. My go-to uke these days is the Blackbird Clara e-koa (tuned to low g), and they have a tenor uke out now. That is really expensive, so you want to play around awhile with the different sizes and materials before you choose an expensive uke. So many things affect playability, and those things are different for each player. Visit a uke group, and see if you can test out a few of their ukes. Find out what neck profile works best for you, how high the action should be, and variations in tone woods. It is a really fun hobby. If you are concerned about resale, take a look at the marketplace here, and see how fast certain ukes sell. Also check out fleamarketmusic.com and their marketplace.https://www.fleamarketmusic.com/marketplace/default.asp
–Lori

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 11:14 AM
Depending on where you live, a laminate can remove a lot of worrying and babysitting. No need to humidify it. If I didn't live in a location where a humidifier isn't necessary (I still check the hygrometer on many days...), I think I would only have laminated ukuleles. Like with solid wood, there are different types and quality levels of laminated ukuleles, and it isn't automatically inferior, at least (I feel) in this price range.

You probably know this from your guitar background already, but it was the thing I wanted to avoid and then ended up just accepting it: the desire to find the one right ukulele right off the bat and not ever wanting or needing anything else, didn't quite turn out to be realistic for me and a fair number of folks here. Whichever instrument you buy, playing it for a time will bring forth new desires, based on preferences you discover. It's really a journey. So from that perspective, you can't get it wrong. :)

Though perhaps the lesson there is to pay attention to the possible resell value. Knowing what I know now, my first four ukulele purchases would have been different, and I probably wouldn't have a custom tenor now (it is a great instrument, but the wrong size for me, at least at this time), but I wouldn't know that if I had not made these purchases. My KoAloha was a gamble, one I didn't except to work out, and yet it became the one purchase I'm the most happy about.

Anyway, as for laminate vs. solid, a solid instrument is likely to have a better resell value because of the belief that solid instruments sound better. My solid acacia tenor does not sound better than the laminate Koalana in the clip (was around $300), and my solid mahagony concert from Stagg does not sound better than some laminate concerts I heard. So based on my limited experience, solid vs. laminate should probably be decided on a comparison of individual instruments. But it is perception also that affects resell values of well, anything really.

Are you set on the tenor size? Planning to tune it re-entrant or linear with a low-g? :)

Edit: As R. wrote, a lot of this is opinion-based. All of it, really. A vendor typically has had more exposure, but they also don't know how your preferences will develop. There are a few people here who I learned seem to often share my views and tastes, so I value their input higher. Jannery is someone like that, and it was her opinion that tipped the scale when I squirmed about whether to buy the LN pineapple. And I know who I'd ask about baritones, if I ever wanted one. But that comes with hanging out here for a while, and still, only actually playing something will tell you what you like or dislike.

Thank you so much for this in depth answer. I am pretty set on a tenor because I fell in love with the ukulele in a very different way than I'm sure many of you have. Oddly, i heard a song written on one that I fell in love with, especially the sound of his uke which I'm certain is top of the line. He only wrote one song on a uke, but fell in love with his uke and is writing more now on his. So ever since, I've been wanting one and I know he plays a tenor (he = Dave Matthews, by the way).

So I narrowed it down to three final choices, which I posted before this one. Let me know what you all think of the choices, and I'll be picking it up before the end of the week!

Anyhow thank you again for your help.

Mivo
02-09-2016, 12:36 PM
The three options all have videos. Which do YOU like best? Make it dependent on that, you have to bond with it. Watch the videos back to back on good headphones or studio speakers, eyes closed. One might stand out.

The Kala is a great deal for a solid tenor. The two laminates sound superb to me also, with my preference favoring the Koalana, but that's all so subjective. Any of these will likely make you happy if you get them set up.

Not helpful, I know. Tyranny of choice sucks. :)

vanflynn
02-09-2016, 12:51 PM
Aloha and welcome to UU Brett. Glad you joined us.

You picked three nice ukes for you first (and hopefully not last) uke. Any of them should treat you right and going with your heart will be fine. Don't be shy about asking the HMS folks questions, they are a great resource.

Happy hunting and keep us posted. We always like pics of new arrivals.

DownUpDave
02-09-2016, 12:53 PM
You are right about Dave Mathews playing and expensive uke, Mya Moe aprox.$1700.00. As a guitar player let me ask you, what guitars do you own that you really like and how much do they cost. Are any of your favorite guitars all laminate???

It is has been my experience that seasoned guitar players get it when it comes to cost versus sound quality. You stated " you wanted to make sure you were not in the beginner category". You are not there but just above it.

All of the ones you picked are decent instruments, the Kala being all solid mahogany gets the edge as it will improve with age. If you can stretch your budget to $400 then you have three models of all solid Kalas and that many of all solid Ponos.

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 12:55 PM
The three options all have videos. Which do YOU like best? Make it dependent on that, you have to bond with it. Watch the videos back to back on good headphones or studio speakers, eyes closed. One might stand out.

The Kala is a great deal for a solid tenor. The two laminates sound superb to me also, with my preference favoring the Koalana, but that's all so subjective. Any of these will likely make you happy if you get them set up.

Not helpful, I know. Tyranny of choice sucks. :)


Extremely helpful! Unfortunately, my ears cannot seem to adjust to the sounds, and I cannot hear which sounds better. My number one choice personally is the Islander MAT-4: http://www.theukulelesite.com/island...kage-deal.html

However, I just want to know that I am getting a good ukulele. I would love to know that, even though its not one of the super-expensive ones, that it has a sound that is enjoyable. Since its made by the popular company Kanile'a, I feel that it must be good! However, with that being said, I'd hate to purchase this one only to find out its considered low-end, toy-ish, could fall apart in a year, lol. I love the Koalana too, but it looks SO BOORING! haha, the Spalted Maple in the Islander MAT-4 looks incredible to my eyes. Couple more responses on the three choices, and then I'm going to pull the trigger! And I couldn't be any more excited to do so!

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 01:04 PM
Aloha and welcome to UU Brett. Glad you joined us.

You picked three nice ukes for you first (and hopefully not last) uke. Any of them should treat you right and going with your heart will be fine. Don't be shy about asking the HMS folks questions, they are a great resource.

Happy hunting and keep us posted. We always like pics of new arrivals.
Thanks so much! you all ROCK!

DownUpDave
02-09-2016, 01:07 PM
Kanilea would not be associated with anything other than a top quality product. I have had a chance to play the Islander splatted maple you like but in a concert size and I will say I was VERY impressed with the sound.

If you love it then get it. It will NOT be the only uke you own. Not if you keep hanging around here :p This is a great place but very bad for the bank account

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 01:08 PM
You are right about Dave Mathews playing and expensive uke, Mya Moe aprox.$1700.00. As a guitar player let me ask you, what guitars do you own that you really like and how much do they cost. Are any of your favorite guitars all laminate???

It is has been my experience that seasoned guitar players get it when it comes to cost versus sound quality. You stated " you wanted to make sure you were not in the beginner category". You are not there but just above it.

All of the ones you picked are decent instruments, the Kala being all solid mahogany gets the edge as it will improve with age. If you can stretch your budget to $400 then you have three models of all solid Kalas and that many of all solid Ponos.

I play a Gibson Keb Mo acoustic/electric. My only concern is that I currently cannot spend any more than 300 bucks on a uke at the moment (Dave's uke it out of the question, lol). I think the Islander has caught my eyes from the beginning, and that's what scared me! Because obviously its all about the sound. My concern is that I hear the same thing out of all three of my choices, lol. Which makes me want to get the Islander, partly also because it is backed by the name Kanile'a.

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 01:10 PM
Kanilea would not be associated with anything other than a top quality product. I have had a chance to play the Islander splatted maple you like but in a concert size and I will say I was VERY impressed with the sound.

If you love then get it. It will NOT be the only uke you own. Not if you keep hanging around here :p This is a great place but very bad for the bank account

Haha, I am familiar with these forums (just not ukulele forums). All I can say is, thanks to Gibson forums, I withdrew all of my life savings. haha. This site rocks. Happy to be here with you all.

DownUpDave
02-09-2016, 01:11 PM
See my other reply about the Islander........you will be very happy with that instrument

Futurethink
02-09-2016, 01:22 PM
I notice that the link you provided for the Islander at HMS is an out-of-stock model. That means the photographs you are looking at are of an 'ukulele that is already sold and shipped. The thing about spalted wood is that no two instruments will look alike. If that's the one you decide on--and if appearance is what seals the deal--ask for some photos of the exact 'ukulele they hope to sell to you.

I decided on a spalted maple Oscar Schmidt baritone. I searched the net carefully and found photos of five different spalted maple patterns. I knew that what I received would not look exactly like any of them. Even so, I was surprised by what I received because it looked drastically different from any of them; more different than I expected. I do like what I received, I was just surprised.

Mivo
02-09-2016, 01:23 PM
The Islander was your favorite in the beginning, and now hours and probably a lot of researching and shop surfing later it is still your favorite. I think that is the one you should be getting. :)

None of them are considered toys. All three brands enjoy a good reputation here, and if you buy them from the aforementioned vendors, that ensures you get a very playable, well set-up instrument.

Let's face it, $200-300 isn't peanuts for a lot of people, and it does buy you a ukulele that is good and that you can enjoy for many years. As much as I love the UU community and appreciate the people here, some (perhaps many) of us are fairly over the top when it comes to ukuleles. A lot of us also enjoy buying and collecting and exploring ukuleles, so there is plenty of talk about expensive ukuleles, and I feel that this can give the flawed impression that anything that doesn't cost at least a grand is sub par or garbage-y. That is really not an accurate reflection on what real life is like, though.

Youtube is full of people who do the most amazing, most beautiful performances with so-called "entry level" ukuleles. Some of the most impressive videos I remember are nearly all by folks with inexpensive instruments. I mean, just look at the demos of the ukes you're considering! There is nothing "entry" about the models you linked. There are "shit ukuleles" around that are barely playable, and some of the national or international music store chains stock those because the ukulele still has the image of being a "toy", a "little guitar", something goofy for parties. That's changing slowly.

None of these chains will do set-ups, none of them will check for playability, they often come with crappy strings that don't stay in tune and sound awful anyway. But that is not the $250 price category, and the dealers recommended here all do great QA and invest real time in setting up every instrument. So even though production ukuleles may not have the same consistency (in terms of set up and intonation) across every and each of the same-model instruments as expensive ukuleles do, you sidestep that issue completely by shopping from these places because they won't sell you anything that is not up to their standards. Their entire reputation hinges on that.

The UU forum can sometimes seem a little snobby, a bit like an exclusive club, but that is not really intentional (I feel) and just a byproduct of the bubbly enthusiasm that people have for their instruments. Don't let that turn you off or cause doubts that what you buy will not be as wonderful and as perfectly adequate. :)

There! Now go and get a uke, and make music!

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 03:39 PM
Lol okay! I am going to go with... Islander MAT-4! Now I'm going to really throw a curveball at you:
I am left handed. I have been through the debate of whether it's acceptable to convert a right handed guitar to left handed for years, except for this year. This was the first year a luthier I use convinced me to purchase a right handed guitar so I didn't feel limited. He assured me that the "debate" is non sense because any guitar can be professionally transformed to left handed. So I bought my first Gibson. My first guitar that I didn't have to search "left handed acoustic" and buy one of the 5 guitars made available for left handed people. And as I figured, the guitar sounded identical to when it was right handed. So I'll get to the point now, lol...

I am doing the same thing with this right handed ukulele... I would like your thoughts as well, since the ukulele world is new to me. Even though it seems like I'll just do it anyways, I really will be listening intently to your thoughts and opinions: first, would you ever convert, and two, what would you do? I've been told that simply switching the strings is enough when it comes to a ukulele with straight intonation such as the one I am looking at. Your thoughts?

By the way, you all are awesome and each one of your opinions means something important to always consider, so thank you.

BrettCo
02-09-2016, 04:08 PM
I notice that the link you provided for the Islander at HMS is an out-of-stock model. That means the photographs you are looking at are of an 'ukulele that is already sold and shipped. The thing about spalted wood is that no two instruments will look alike. If that's the one you decide on--and if appearance is what seals the deal--ask for some photos of the exact 'ukulele they hope to sell to you.

I decided on a spalted maple Oscar Schmidt baritone. I searched the net carefully and found photos of five different spalted maple patterns. I knew that what I received would not look exactly like any of them. Even so, I was surprised by what I received because it looked drastically different from any of them; more different than I expected. I do like what I received, I was just surprised.

This is amazing advice, because I took exactly what you had said and asked for additional photos of the real ones in stock. I was supplied with looked like three entirely different instruments! All 3 are unique, which is cool, but what made it even better was being able to choose exactly the one I wanted. So thank you for your advice, this is exactly why these forums work. Because the community is built with people who sincerely want to help.

Please check out my last post about being left-handed. I'd love your opinion on the conversion (if you have one, of course) along with everybody else.

sculptor
02-09-2016, 08:56 PM
Hi everybody. I am new to the board and new to the world of ukuleles. I am excited to be here. I have a question for anybody that may be able to help:

I am looking for the best Tenor ukulele at the 300 dollar range max. If you could only buy one ukulele, and had 300, what would you buy? I have played acoustic guitar for 20 years, and I've been through the cheap guitars and no longer want to go that route with ukuleles. I know that 300 bucks is still basically entry level, but what would be the best I could do with it?

Lastly, I am looking for brand new. I was interested in the Islander MAT-4 tenor spalted maple, but if I should steer away, just let me know! Thanks so much everybody. HMS as online sounds samples of everything they sell and all I say is give a Pono a listen.

Brett

Brett --

Your logic is spot on but your budget is $51 too low. I did a ton of research and determined that the low end Ponos were the way to go. They are manufactured overseas for Ko'olau to their specs and using their methods. The Pono build and sound are of a professional quality. I bought a Pono MT (mahogany tenor) from HMS (http://www.theukulelesite.com.)

-- Gary

Mivo
02-09-2016, 11:14 PM
I am doing the same thing with this right handed ukulele... I would like your thoughts as well, since the ukulele world is new to me.

In the book "The Idiot's Guide to Playing the Ukulele", the author David Hodge wrote an entire page on this topic. In summary, he (himself a left-handed ukulele and guitar player) said that a left-handed person can choose to either play right- or left-handed, whichever they prefer (some players, like Tiny Tim, do/did play with either hand configuration). If you do play left-handed, you should probably flip the order of the strings so that it's easier to follow tabs (so instead of gCEA, you'd order the strings AECg). This is apparently all preference and there should be no difference as far as the instrument's construction is concerned. This is information from the book, I have no personal experience (being right-handed myself).

If you want to be totally sure, post a message down in the luthier section and ask the builders. They will know best. :)

Nickie
02-10-2016, 03:50 AM
Hi Brett!
Welcome to UU! Whichever uke you get, HMS, MIMS, and Uke Republic all do setups on each uke. You can even spec which strings you want. Almost every uke sold comes with Aquilas, which are fine. Aquila's owner, Mimmo, is a contributor here.
As far as being left handed, how are your guitars strung? I'd stick with that on your uke, if it's working.
(I don't believe in fixing what works)
Enjoy your new uke, please let us know when it arrives (after you put it down cause your fingers are bleeding)

BrettCo
02-10-2016, 04:01 AM
Thanks for the replies everyone! My guitars were all filed at the nut, allowing the strings to sit properly. Since they are flipped, the only concern is buzzing coming from the strings (since, for example, the low E string would now be sitting in the high E strong notch in the nut). I bought all X bracing guitars so that the bracing doesn't affect the sound. I never had any problems swapping to left handed, and my Gibson couldn't sound any better.

Simply switching the strings on a uke may not be enough, is this correct? I may also need to have the nut filed a bit to widen the gaps where the strings sit. Im going to have my local luthier check it out, but it looks like it's no problem at all.

Those stores sound perfect for me. That's great that they all do setups! As soon as I get paid, I'll be visiting one of them :)

strumsilly
02-10-2016, 04:30 AM
This is all GREAT Info. I really appreciate it. So I think these are my final choices. I was wondering if anyone has any experience with any of them, and also which you would choose. I will base my decision off of your advice, because my ears deceive me online.

-islander MAT-4 laminate tenor - link: http://www.theukulelesite.com/islander-spalted-maple-tenor-mat-package-deal.html

-koalana tenor - link: http://www.theukulelesite.com/koalana-tenor-kta-0010.html
-kala tenor Ka-smht
link: http://www.theukulelesite.com/kala-smht-solid-mahogany-tenor.html

Thanks all! This will make my decision final :)I have an Islander AT-4, kOALOHA TENOR, AND HAVE HAD Solid Kalas in the past. I like the slightly wider fretboard of the Islander and the Koaloha. That is just personal preferance. Though it is a laminate, the Islander has extremely thin , high quality lam and is a great sounding and playing uke. The Koaloha is my favorite, but is a $1k uke. The one uke I'm sorry I sold was a Kala cedar top. All your choices are good ones. It is great to have so many choices.

70sSanO
02-10-2016, 04:59 AM
When you buy the uke, you need to have the person set it for playing left handed. It may be possible to to just cut the groove out for the right handed E string so it will accept a larger LH C string. For linear tuning the RH A string slot, now low G, slot would have to be cut a little wider.

It is best to talk to the person who is selling you the ukulele and find out if the nut can be re-worked or just swapped out for a new one. It is a pretty simple task, but it may cost a little more for the extra work.

Don't ebay this uke to save a buck or two, go to one of the retailers that have been recommended and will stand behind their sale.

Have fun!

John

Ukulele Eddie
02-10-2016, 04:54 PM
You said $300 not including tax, case or shipping. So if those things are included, it sounds like you might be able to spend $350-$400 "delivered". If you spend $400 at HMS, shipping is free. Here are a few I think sound great for the money:

Pono Mango Tenor (pineapple or traditional shape) $350
http://www.theukulelesite.com/shop-by/price/200-399/pono-mgtp-mango-tenor-pineapple-w-case.html
http://www.theukulelesite.com/shop-by/price/200-399/pono-mgt-mango-tenor.html

Kala Spruce/Ovangkol, $365
http://www.theukulelesite.com/shop-by/price/200-399/kala-spruce-ovangkol-tenor-asov-t.html

Fender Nohea with Fishman Pickup (killer pickup), $350
http://www.theukulelesite.com/shop-by/price/200-399/fender-jimmy-stafford-nohea-tenor-w-fishman-sonitone.html

hendulele
02-11-2016, 12:53 AM
I'm a soprano/concert guy, and I recommend the KoAlana highly. I'm sure the tenor is put together with the same care of the concert I own. Great playability, solid build, wonderful sound. I'd also recommend buying from a dealer who will set it up. Mim's my favorite, and I know she's a KoAloha dealer, so she may also stock KoAlanas.

If not, another possibility is the North Carolina Ukulele Academy (alohau.com), where I bought my KoAlana in person. Kent is a great guy and will do an excellent setup for you.

mm stan
02-12-2016, 04:03 PM
Check the marketplace, a second hand uke offers a better deal and you get a higher level uke at a lower cost
Of 25 % or more.. good luck, happy strummings :)