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View Full Version : Torn between baritone uke and nylon stringed guitar



C-roy
04-06-2009, 10:56 AM
Hey guys. I am well rounded with all different stringed instruments, but I'm sick of playing all of them, and I just want to use 1 instrument that I like, and stick with just one. Also, I purchase too many instruments, and I need to stop for now, It's like an addiction.

I've narrowed down to what I want to play all the time which is either a baritone ukulele, or a 3/4 nylon stringed guitar.

I was just playing my baritone now, and I love the sweet sound played slowly, but I still like the nylon stringed guitar, because there is more of a variety of things to play on it, or atleast that what it feels like to me.

I looked at the guitalele by yamaha, although I'm in the states, I can always pay a load of shipping, but I wouldn't have the chance to play it first in person, and currently I don't know what the standard tuning is on it.

I know this decision is up to me, and it's a ukulele forum, so I think most of you will say ukulele, but I will appreciate if i get some suggestions on the baritone ukulele, nylon guitar, and the guitalele:)

It might help me:)

Thanks...

Pippin
04-06-2009, 11:05 AM
I love a good baritone ukulele. I have the Ohana BK-32, solid mahogany ukulele and it is beautiful and sounds wonderful.

I'd opt for a baritone over a classical guitar any day. I love playing rock and roll on my baritone ukes. Some of my favorites are Hotel California, Dust In the Wind, Ridin' the Storm Out, just about any rock ballad. Then, of course, there are jazz tunes, and blues tunes, and some old folk tunes... all on a bari.

myloshylow
04-06-2009, 11:09 AM
In my humble opinion, I think if you had to have only 1 of those instruments I would say go with the nylon guitar. I just think it's a lot easier to go from guitar to baritone uke, if you wanted to later down the road, than the other way around. Plus, for a new player, I think there's way more learning resources (books, local tutors, online videos, etc) out there for guitars than ukes atm. At least that's my experience, as a guitar player who learned ukulele later.

NukeDOC
04-06-2009, 11:16 AM
all you ever need:
1. a thin bodied classical guitar with narrow fretboard (look at some of the ibanez guitars)
2. a tenor ukulele

this combo will basically give you the best of both worlds.

ive owned an ibanez AEG10N and it was an exceptional guitar for the price. and the electronics were some of the best ive messed with. even the onboard tuner was spot on. so good my brother got the same guitar. haha. and because of the narrower neck and the thinner body, you get the feel of a decent grand auditorium steel string, but the finger friendly nylon strings.

having a tenor ukulele along with a guitar like this will give you the missing sound of the ukulele that you're longing for in a profile that will feel more at home with your guitar playing style. yet still be that much different (when tuned gCEA) so you know its a different instrument.

back to guitars, martin also sells a 3/4 size guitar that doesnt have the slotted headstock, but it is strung with nylons... at least thats what i saw at guitarcenter. its likely that one of the guys at GC may have replaced the steel strings with nylons. but it worked. no electronics like the ibanez, but its smaller. and costs about the same. ~$300

GX9901
04-06-2009, 11:19 AM
Isn't a baritone more or less the same as a classical guitar except with two fewer strings? In that case I'd say get the classical guitar.

dave alexander
04-06-2009, 11:55 AM
Also, I purchase too many instruments, and I need to stop for now, It's like an addiction.


If you really are serious...then you'd better stay away from ukes altogether. UAS hits hard.

I can't navigate the stings of a guitar -- not standard type anyway. Too many, and they're too close together. Yes, a guitar is more versatile. At the expense of simplicity, IMHO.

If you are comfortable with guitar, go for it. Mylo is right about resources.

C-roy
04-06-2009, 12:23 PM
Thanks for your suggestions guys. I really do have a problem with always purchasing instruments, and never knowing what I want to play. I am all over the place with it, and it is ridiculous.I've been playing guitar for 4 years and am not a beginner, but am fairly new to ukulele, and already have a baritone and a soprano.

I'm going to stick with the classical, and I guess put everything away in the attic for now.

I'll check out the 3/4 guitars that some of you mentioned. Thanks again.

C-roy
04-06-2009, 12:24 PM
[QUOTE=dave alexander;114114]If you really are serious...then you'd better stay away from ukes altogether. UAS hits hard.

What's UAS? Ukulele something syndrome?

dave alexander
04-06-2009, 02:22 PM
Ukulele Acquisition Syndrome

When the ukes start bringing home friends...

drjond56
04-06-2009, 02:34 PM
I feel your pain. I was just reviewing prices of various baritone ukes. I actually started from the classical guitar side and got into the uke arena a couple of years ago. The problem is that I am not sure there is one right instrument. I am not a gearhead, and I mainly play nylon guitar in various styles, but there are certain situations where a steel-string is mandatory, so I have one that I play. I have a KoAloha tenor uke that is an exceptional instrument, but I am in a situation now where I am sometimes playing with guitarists and sharing the same music. For a number of reasons, it would be easier to use a bari uke to read off the same sheet as a guitarist (no transposition, etc). Yeah, I could just play the guitar, but for some things I like the flavor of the uke/guitar duet. BTW,having just reviewed the Kanilea website, they have some alternative instruments you might have an interest in.

Jon

C-roy
04-06-2009, 02:51 PM
hey john. Yeah i agree about the steel string being mandatory, especially while playing with other people. The classical guitar, and steel string don't mix to well especially with strumming.

I just checked out the kanilea website, and the guitalele does look nice, but it's 1,295 dollars, and I don't have that, but I do have enough for the yamaha's guitalele even though it wouldn't be as nice.

Question. Do you use the same chord shapes on the guitalele as you do on the guitar?

gotrice415510
04-06-2009, 03:37 PM
hey john. Yeah i agree about the steel string being mandatory, especially while playing with other people. The classical guitar, and steel string don't mix to well especially with strumming.

I just checked out the kanilea website, and the guitalele does look nice, but it's 1,295 dollars, and I don't have that, but I do have enough for the yamaha's guitalele even though it wouldn't be as nice.

Question. Do you use the same chord shapes on the guitalele as you do on the guitar?

its tuned ADGCEA i believe

C-roy
04-06-2009, 03:43 PM
hmm... would that still be the same chord shapes?

I think I have a fetish for instruments :)

Hmm... I'm thinking about a 1/4 classical guitar now since its basically the same size, and I don't have to worry about the shipping. I would just have to buy the right strings if I wanted to tune it like a guitalele, or if i want i can just keep it tuned like a guitar.

Damn should I go with the 1/4 classical or the 3/4? I like the smaller instruments though.

gotrice415510
04-06-2009, 03:45 PM
hmm... would that still be the same chord shapes?

I think I have a fetish for instruments :)

Hmm... I'm thinking about a 1/4 classical guitar now since its basically the same size, and I don't have to worry about the shipping. I would just have to buy the right strings if I wanted to tune it like a guitalele, or if i want i can just keep it tuned like a guitar.

Damn should I go with the 1/4 classical or the 3/4? I like the smaller instruments though.are their any quality 1/4 guitars?

C-roy
04-06-2009, 04:07 PM
eh, i really don't know. probably not though.

I've searched this forum on the guitalele, and someone has posted this one.

http://www.elderly.com/new_instruments/items/AG1/4-MAH-GLOSS.htm

I'm pretty sure it's still considered cheap though.

SamWise
04-06-2009, 10:25 PM
Definitely guitar over a bari. I have a bari on review right now, and I'm just not sure what its for. Ukes are for real, but the baritone just feels like a guitar with 2 strings missing. Everything you could play on the baritone, you could play on your classical guitar, plus you'll be able to put all that lovely bass movement into chords.

All that said, I'm all about the lots of instruments route, and always have been.

Gaby
04-07-2009, 03:41 AM
Sorry, but I reckon get a real guitar or a real uke. Not a Chinese invention (i.e. 3/4, 1/2, 1/4). So get a nice Spanish full size guitar and you will never look back. Or get a real uke, with uke tuning.

By the way, smaller size nylon string guitars tend to be sloppy, have bad intonation and sound horrible.

PoisonDart
04-07-2009, 03:45 AM
I love my bari uke, but I'm thinking of getting a guitalele or a small classical guitar anyway. Then again, I'm also thinking of getting a tenor uke and a soprano i can take to the beach, and a banjouke and a resonator uke and...

UKISOCIETY
04-07-2009, 05:46 AM
Definitely guitar over a bari. I have a bari on review right now, and I'm just not sure what its for. Ukes are for real, but the baritone just feels like a guitar with 2 strings missing. Everything you could play on the baritone, you could play on your classical guitar, plus you'll be able to put all that lovely bass movement into chords.

All that said, I'm all about the lots of instruments route, and always have been.

Baritone ukes are for uke players who want some lower notes but are too ashamed to buy a guitar. :) I thought I'd never own one, but Elderly instruments have some cigar box baris for cheap so I tried it out and liked the tone and feel. It plugs in, too.

Although switching between bari and sopranino can take a few minutes adjusting!

WS64
04-07-2009, 05:53 AM
Yamaha Guitalele (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YXcMfQOx8LQ).
It's a cheap (less than $100) but very good instrument.

Online downside is, it's not available in USA.
Here in Europe it's very easy to get for 65€.

Lori
04-07-2009, 07:07 AM
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?p=110213#post110213

Look at vahn's post #14 for his review of a 1/4 size Strunal guitar. Other reviews I have seen say that classical guitar teachers recommend this instrument to their students.

I was thinking of one of these, and the Strunal comes with a gloss finish (or matte optional) while the Yamaha comes in a satin finish. There are also a couple of different wood choices on the Sturnals. There are cheaper ones for $135 and others that have a solid cedar top for $166.98.
https://meantone.com/Shop/SolidTopGuitars.shtml

–Lori

C-roy
04-07-2009, 06:34 PM
http://www.ukuleleunderground.com/forum/showthread.php?p=110213#post110213

Look at vahn's post #14 for his review of a 1/4 size Strunal guitar. Other reviews I have seen say that classical guitar teachers recommend this instrument to their students.

I was thinking of one of these, and the Strunal comes with a gloss finish (or matte optional) while the Yamaha comes in a satin finish. There are also a couple of different wood choices on the Sturnals. There are cheaper ones for $135 and others that have a solid cedar top for $166.98.
https://meantone.com/Shop/SolidTopGuitars.shtml

–Lori

Thanks lori, those are probably the best 1/4 quality wise right there compared to the others. I still am not sure If I'm going to get a 3/4 or a 1/4.

Hmm....