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Vespa Bob
02-12-2016, 10:32 AM
Working as diligently as I could on the uke I'm building for my son, everything was going well until my choice to use black CA to glue in the rosette proved to be a bad one! I almost cried when I saw it bleeding through the spruce top.
My choices are, as far as I can tell are (1) stain the top black:rolleyes:, (2) flip the board over and use the back as the top, at least I won't have to fork out for a new one, or (3), bite the bullet and start from scratch. That's probably the best way to go, it's just that I hate to see the material wasted. I also considered routing a channel and adding another rosette strip, but I think the rosette is already on the large size, so I scrapped that idea. Anyone have a miracle idea?

Bob

strumsilly
02-12-2016, 10:58 AM
leave it alone and say it was designed that way or
cut it out, I have some nice ukes without rosettes.

70sSanO
02-12-2016, 11:33 AM
I'm not a luthier, but for your son... bite the bullet.

He may be fine with it, but every time you look at it you'll kick yourself.

John

Red Cliff
02-12-2016, 11:53 AM
What John said, and get some shellac on it before you glue in the rosette to stop it happening again.

Peace Train
02-12-2016, 12:04 PM
Widen the diameter of the rosette to cover the bleeding.

mikeyb2
02-12-2016, 12:41 PM
I'm no expert myself, but I would go with Peace Train's idea and maybe rout out the bleeding on either side of the paua and replace it with something matching the back or neck wood, if you are able to make such a thing. Not sure I could, but I'd have a go( before I routed the bleeding). Mike

Kevs-the-name
02-12-2016, 12:41 PM
I agree with most here.
As disappointing as it may seem, bite the bullet and start again on this one. This one 'needs' to be right.
Whatever else you try to do? You will never be quite happy with it.

You can reuse some of the bits!
Perhaps try turning the board upside down or expanding the rosette, but do it as a sideline piece.
Either that or cut out and tidy up rosette to reuse, and slice board up to use as bridge plates!
Fun fun fun!

Teek
02-12-2016, 01:26 PM
maybe put the top on a scanner and scan that area into Photoshop. Draw an inner and outer circle in a color that matches back or side wood or headstock face plate etc. Then print it and cut it out, lay it over the top, tape it down and see how it looks. If it's good, then rout it out. If not then start over. Or do a black sand inlay (like Kanile'a is using beach sand for inlay). There is gorgeous stuff available at my local building supply. Then bind and appoint the uke in ebony.

seattle
02-12-2016, 01:50 PM
Acetone? Can't you remove CA? I didn't even know there was black CA.

Even sanding would remove it.

Vespa Bob
02-12-2016, 02:07 PM
Thanks so much for all your advice and suggestions! The only reason I'm not crazy about the idea of increasing the size of the rosette is because I feel it is on the large side already. It's 3" in diameter and it's a concert size uke. It is the smallest size that Hani Lima sells. Right now, I'm leaving it alone while I work on other parts of the instrument, which are coming along nicely. I'll probably end up starting fresh on the top. Thanks again for your suggestions.

Bob

Michael Smith
02-12-2016, 02:19 PM
On a deal like that If you hated the ideal of enlarging the rosette I would just kiss the top goodbye. You can route around that rosette close. First the inside then the outside. Then take it to the drum sander and remove the wood from the back and install it on a new top. When drum sanding off the wood from the back when it gets paper thin stop drum sanding and just pop out the rosette with your hands. I have done it many times. You need a fine router bit to make it work well.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
02-12-2016, 02:20 PM
keep adding BWB's till its gone.

Or pull out the paua and make a wooden ring- if you do this make sure to use a light wood as using a dark wood makes it look even BIGGER.

sequoia
02-12-2016, 07:16 PM
OK. Maybe it isn't that bad. Maybe just go ahead and build the uke and forget about the friggen rosette? CA glue and spruce can be brutal. I know. Ok. Next time seal the top first. Lesson learned, Maybe it is how the thang sounds that matters and nobody but luthiers really cares? Lesson learned. Shellac seal any wood before CA gluing. I'm sure the next uke will be flawless. "Fixing" that CA glue bleed is impossible at this point.

Allen
02-12-2016, 08:12 PM
It's just a sound board and a bit of shell. Get over it and either turn it over and go without a rosette. Or get another sound board and go again. Every one of us has been there. You'll probably not do that same mistake more than a couple more times. :D

Trying to fix something like that by adding more and more purflings is going to look like a fix for something, and you'll still be unsatisfied.

I've had one day when I've tossed out 3 necks that didn't meet the grade. Built complete instruments (guitars and ukuleles) that I wasn't happy with and then ran them through the bandsaw. And would be at least a dozen soundboards in the last 5 years that I tossed after something or other didn't meet with my expectations.

Kekani
02-12-2016, 08:56 PM
Change the rosette to an inlay.

Or toss it, especially if you don't inlay, or want to pay someone else to do it.

I know how to inlay. In this case, I'd toss it. Too easy to start over.

And, what Allen said.

lauburu
02-12-2016, 09:10 PM
I have a growing collection of flawed ukulele parts. I'm keeping them so that one day when I have the full set I'll build a a complete uke out of them. I'll keep it in the workshop as a visible reminder to slow down and think before rushing from one task to the next. Festina lente.
Miguel

seattle
02-13-2016, 03:05 AM
I just realized that the glue was bleeding though the wood fibers rather than something that could be removed or sanded. Thanks for posting this. It's a good learning tool.

Yes, just getting a new soundboard seems like the best coarse of action here. Make sure to post a picture of the finished product.

Hluth
02-13-2016, 04:02 AM
If you do it over, try gluing in the purfling first with wood glue, then fit the shell and run thin CA over it so it only comes in contact with the inner side of the purfling and bottom of the inlay.

Vespa Bob
02-13-2016, 07:07 AM
Once again I appreciate you all taking the time and showing interest in my dilemma. After sleeping on it, I'm completely at peace with the situation and have already ordered a new top and will consider the original as a practice piece! I'll use Michael's method to remove the shell , thanks, Michael.
Bob

Pete Howlett
02-13-2016, 10:49 AM
Glue your bwb lines with Titebond wood glue. You can then use CA to glue the shell. Do not used colored CA - it's not necessary...

Vespa Bob
02-14-2016, 04:22 AM
Thanks, Pete, lesson learned!


Bob

Habanera Hal
02-15-2016, 07:32 AM
Like Red Cliff says, always spray some shellac on the board to prevent staining. Now that we've locked the barn door after the horse got loose, yeah make a new top. Hold onto this one and keep it in a prominent spot in your workshop as a constant reminder. I'm on my third workshop right now because I've filled the last two up with my mistakes! (Latest one was drilling an indexing hole for my rosette router - into the BACK piece of my build!)

Timbuck
02-15-2016, 09:03 AM
Like Red Cliff says, always spray some shellac on the board to prevent staining. Now that we've locked the barn door after the horse got loose, yeah make a new top. Hold onto this one and keep it in a prominent spot in your workshop as a constant reminder. I'm on my third workshop right now because I've filled the last two up with my mistakes! (Latest one was drilling an indexing hole for my rosette router - into the BACK piece of my build!) So I take it that the back piece will now be the front piece on the next build ;)

Habanera Hal
02-16-2016, 01:36 PM
So I take it that the back piece will now be the front piece on the next build ;)

I don't know what I'm going to do. I can't match the wood (it's a spalted waterfall bubinga) Maybe I will make this the soundboard and use a solid piece of bubinga for the back. Would that look too weird?

Bad Juju
02-18-2016, 05:08 AM
How about airbrushing a blue-ish burst or fade that radiates out from the rosette? If shaped right it can look like a blue sun or maybe the light that radiates from behind the moon during a solar eclipse.

rustycase
02-29-2016, 10:50 AM
How about airbrushing a blue-ish burst or fade that radiates out from the rosette? If shaped right it can look like a blue sun or maybe the light that radiates from behind the moon during a solar eclipse.

Yep. You could do like that.. or hand paint with an artist brush.

88817

Anything creative to cover the extent of the slip-up...

Paint covers a multitude of sins!
ymmv
rc

Vespa Bob
03-01-2016, 08:11 AM
Since this thread has re-surfaced, I'm obliged to give an update. I purchased a new spruce soundboard and prepared it for the rosette. I decided to re-design the rosette since I felt that the previous one seemed too large. When the time came for the inlay, I was careful to first spray the area with shellac, then scribed the outline with a tool made specifically for the purpose before routing the channel. I then carefully installed the inner and outer purfling strips using a CA filled pipette to ensure that the CA went in the right places after carefully forgetting to place wax paper under the sound board resulting in it being glued to the work board!:wallbash: Talk about stupid! See Ken, you have nothing to worry about.:) Anyway, after sharpening an edge of my card scraper, I slid it between the soundboard and work surface and pried the sound board loose, with hardly any damage. I won't make that mistake again!
Progressing slowly, one step forward, two steps back.

Bob