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View Full Version : Resetting the neck of an old Gretsch soprano



Henning
03-05-2016, 02:55 AM
Hello, I donīt know exactly how to treat this (please see the pics). But the white greyish seems to both look and behave as cardboard:confused:
If you have any advices I will most likely kindly accept them.

The photos are supposed to show how bad the neck fits to the body. I fear a little I didnīt completely succeed in trying to do that.

8894188942

Best regards

spongeuke
03-05-2016, 04:35 PM
Given what I see, I'd start at removing all the old glue then do what you have to, to acheive a proper fit and alignment to the sound board and bridge. Before gluing it all back up again.

Henning
04-18-2016, 11:30 PM
Could anyone help me out with this, please?

When resetting the neck I find two questions:
When I look at the body it seems as though the side where the neck is supposed to be attached is slightly lose.
It also seems as though if the scale length is too short.

What could I fill the empty space with in the side where the neck is to be attached?
When adjusting to proper scale length, is it better if I use a laminated wood then a solid that wonīt be as stable?


The area within the red "circle" is intended to show the hollow volume.
90371

Regards

Timbuck
04-19-2016, 03:13 AM
Looking at the evidence I'd say that neck has been off and on more than once and some one has been shimming with cardboard to reset the neck angle....If it was me I'd clean off all the glue down to bare wood trim round the void bit with a sharp tool and inlay it with a thin bit of wood .. Maybe add a bit of wood to the heel end of the neck then re-shape it to fit the body...glue the neck back on in line reglue the extension back on and fit a new fret... when that bit is done, then see what i could do about adjusting the bridge and saddle to get the scale right...But thats me ;)

As an afterthought ..I think i'd get rid of the dowel and make it a bolt on job.:)

Henning
05-07-2016, 10:33 PM
Thanks for your responses, how about the idea to fill the void with some hard putty, like for instance chemical metal?

Regards

lauburu
05-08-2016, 12:58 PM
Not a good idea.
My Dad always said "If a job's worth doing, it's worth doing well."
Miguel

Henning
06-02-2016, 09:05 AM
Not a good idea.
My Dad always said "If a job's worth doing, it's worth doing well."
Miguel

Thatīs true. But why is it a better job to put the wooden piece there to fill up the empty space?
If assuming the chemical metal is more stable.

Regards

Mutantmoose
06-09-2016, 04:05 AM
Thatīs true. But why is it a better job to put the wooden piece there to fill up the empty space?
If assuming the chemical metal is more stable.

Regards

It is better because you can glue wood to wood, and that will be more stable. The glue you use for wood will bond to both pieces, where if you use metal, you now have to use a glue that will bond to both glue and metal, while under string tension.

Timbuck
06-09-2016, 04:15 AM
Is this job done yet or what ..it's been on the go for 4 months. :confused:

Henning
06-09-2016, 09:34 AM
Is this job done yet or what ..it's been on the go for 4 months. :confused:

Well, yepp, I have been busy doing other things and hesitating to start with this. Not exactly knowing how to adjust the surface mating to the neck. cheers!

Timbuck
06-09-2016, 10:32 AM
Forget it your sacked ....Our Lass says she'll do it in her Teabreak :)

Henning
06-10-2016, 09:51 AM
Forget it your sacked ....Our Lass says she'll do it in her Teabreak :)

Marvellous! Just bring her over. ;)

Pondoro
06-11-2016, 06:26 AM
How did you remove the neck? I have an old, non valuable uke that needs a reset.

Henning
06-12-2016, 07:16 AM
I

1- wringed and
1.a. tilted it, and
2. twisted and
3. wet it again

Back to 1 for what seemed an eternity, that is at least 25,4 us (micro seconds) ;)

Henning
06-12-2016, 07:18 AM
Forget it your sacked ....Our Lass says she'll do it in her Teabreak :)

Concerning tea break and a lass. Iīll have a discussion with the police first, just in case...
http://metro.co.uk/2015/10/28/this-new-sexual-consent-and-tea-video-from-the-police-is-brilliant-5466392/

Otherwise Iīll keep the pot hot, that is teapot. Or at least the water for it.

Pondoro
06-12-2016, 07:48 AM
I

1- wringed and
1.a. tilted it, and
2. twisted and
3. wet it again

Back to 1 for what seemed an eternity, that is at least 25,4 us (micro seconds) ;)

I am not sure what "wringed" means - did you heat it? Wet it? Inject steam?

Thanks, I'm very interested.

Henning
06-18-2016, 02:12 AM
I cut as much as I could with a surgeons knife and wringing is twisting after having wet the area freed by cutting. In this case there was a lot of glue because the joint was so badly done.
I tried to heat first, but that only seemed to destroy the finish.
As it was glued with hide glue water is a solvent. Though it will take some time.
Just one dowel pin wasnīt that easy and what really happened was that the dowel pin finally broke.

Henning
06-18-2016, 02:15 AM
It is better because you can glue wood to wood, and that will be more stable. The glue you use for wood will bond to both pieces, where if you use metal, you now have to use a glue that will bond to both glue and metal, while under string tension.

Is there any particular sort of wood you would recommend?
Does it necessary have to be the wood of the same sort as in the neck?
How about using veneer?