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ruby50
03-18-2016, 04:08 AM
I never have dreams that I remember - not in 10 years - but this morning I woke up with a fully formed idea for cutting the length of the sides to fit the mold properly. I gave it a shot with some scrap and it works perfectly. I am making a dreadnought soprano Style 3 in Osage Orange:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/ruby1638/25248630024/in/album-72157665930252361/

Ed

Timbuck
03-18-2016, 06:55 AM
Very similar to the way I do it ... But I like you're method using the mold...I find I don't need to sand or plane the joint afterwards...and a finer toothed blade eg: 10 TPI will give better results.

ksquine
03-18-2016, 08:09 AM
I don't understand what the second photo is showing.....the side stuck into the slot.
Otherwise, I do about the same thing with a handsaw. I also score the sides a few times with a sharp knife first to prevent those fuzzy edges

Allen
03-18-2016, 11:13 AM
I clamp my sides in a male / female 1/2 mould and use a pencil to mark the ends. Cut on the bandsaw close and use a shooting board to plain the end grain to the line. Works perfectly every time, and with timbers that have homogenous type of grain like Mahogany you can get an almost invisible join.

pointpergame
03-18-2016, 11:33 AM
I clamp my sides in a male / female 1/2 mould and use a pencil to mark the ends. Cut on the bandsaw close and use a shooting board to plain the end grain to the line.....

Generally that's how I do this operation as well for most end grain operations, big or small. I find that scribing the line with a perfect light, cross-grained cut works quite well at the shooting board. It's easy to get better than .005" accuracy since the scribe/cut shows you exactly where to stop planing. And zero tear out.

Timbuck
03-18-2016, 02:34 PM
And then you put in an end graft....why. ;)

ruby50
03-18-2016, 02:50 PM
Thanks all

Thinking about it, I really like this. Since you are cutting both sides at once and they are flat on the table, it does not matter if the blade is exactly square to the table. I don't usually use an end graft and this will make it easier to get a good joint

ksquine - sorry for any confusion but I though the text would make it clear - that is a scrap piece that fit the kerf and it just so happens that it is a piece of Osage Orange and it looks like a side. It's just a random shim

Ed

Kevs-the-name
03-18-2016, 02:56 PM
Generally that's how I do this operation as well for most end grain operations, big or small. I find that scribing the line with a perfect light, cross-grained cut works quite well at the shooting board. It's easy to get better than .005" accuracy since the scribe/cut shows you exactly where to stop planing. And zero tear out.

I'm struggling with tear out or 'chipping' of the end grain when using a shooting board. Trying to find out the reason/solution.

Allen
03-18-2016, 11:02 PM
The fence on your shooting board needs support the piece. So that the plane blade would have cut the fence when it was first set up. The the blade must be very sharp. Using a low angle plane is advantageous for most timbers. And light cuts. You'll never get good results taking a heavy cut no matter how sharp the blade and good your set up is.

sequoia
03-19-2016, 06:47 PM
And then you put in an end graft....why. ;)

Exactly. That is why God invented end grafts. Amen.