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Martynas
03-21-2016, 08:39 PM
i bought the brand new ukelele called Kala KA-KCGE-C Electro-Acoustic Concert Ukulele. and i decided to buy amp too and there is one that might be great but i want to be sure so im asking is this amp great or no for that uke? http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/SubZero-25W-Acoustic-Guitar-Amp-with-Chorus/NE6
if no can you offer me some amps from that site?
THank you guys ;):o:)

anthonyg
03-21-2016, 08:52 PM
Whats your budget?

If you want the best then try this, an AER,

http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/AER-Alpha-Plus-Acoustic-Guitar-Amp/OCI

A Roland AC-40 is a great amp for the money of if you want battery power the a Roland AC-33 (I use an AC-33)

http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/Roland-AC-40-Acoustic-Chorus-Guitar-Amplifier/TXT

Fishman are well regarded.

http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/Fishman-Loudbox-Mini-Acoustic-Guitar-Combo-Amplifier/O9J

If your more budget minded you could try a Behringer,

http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/Behringer-ACX450-Ultracoustic-Amp/4W2

TO be honest I haven't heard of the brand you've inquired about. Its possibly OK for the money but I would certainly be auditioning it in person if I was to consider buying it.

Anthony

Brad Bordessa
03-21-2016, 09:16 PM
^Anthony is on it. I echo his suggestions.

Been seeing the Fishman loudboxes around. Haven't played through them much, but the fiddle player in my band uses one: sounds great and screams for the size. I've been using a QSC K10 powered speaker with my Venue DI for "amp" gigs. Does the job cleanly since I've got it laying around, but there are better options for the money if you want a "real" amp. But something to consider if you're ever going to want a PA.

phil hague
03-21-2016, 10:58 PM
I have a Roland ac 40. Great sounds from it, but mains only ( I converted mine to run on battery)
The Roland ac 33 is more expensive but runs on battery or mains, also I believe it has a built in looper, so this might be the better option for you. Whatever you chose I suggest you buy an accoustic amp for use with an accoustic electric instrument.

kissing
03-21-2016, 11:25 PM
It really depends on many personal factors.

-How much you want to spend?
Simply asking "what's the best amp" without indication of budget would mean that only $5000+ amps are "the best".
If you give an idea of how much you want to spend, you can pick the best choice from there.

-What kind of amp?
What do you want to do with your amp plugged in?
Do you want to recreate a purely acoustic sound, or do you want to treat your ukulele like an "electric instrument" and play around with distortion and effects like an electric guitar

-What features matter to you?
Is battery power a feature you need? Do you want built-in effects? Do you want a single channel or multiple channels? Perhaps a separate channel for a microphone? How big and powerful does it need to be? Do you need to perform live to a stadium? Or a small audience?




That being said, generally stick to reputable brands, eg: Vox, Roland, Fishman, Fender, Behringer and Kustom all have good amps for the money!

Martynas
03-22-2016, 02:45 AM
I can spend only ~100 euros since its my first uke and amp. I dont know what kind of amp there is but i know i want acoustic one to recreate purely acoustic sound. It will be for practice and so at home. I dont need much efects or something like that. I will plug in only ukulele. Again it will be used at home. Can you offer now something?

anthonyg
03-22-2016, 03:21 AM
Well to be brutally honest you don't need an amplifier to practice at home. In fact home practice is FAR better without an amplifier. Less likely to annoy your neighbours or even family. One of the ADVANTAGES of solid body instruments is that you can practice at home and make very little noise.

Save your money until you have a requirement for public performance.

Anthony

kissing
03-22-2016, 03:29 AM
I'm with Anthony on this one.

You have an acoustic-electric uke.
The natural acoustic tone is the best tone. Getting an acoustic amp is purely for performing in an environment where the ukulele itself is not loud enough.

People don't usually plug in their acoustic instrument into an acoustic amp for the sake of practice at home. That's not usually what an amplifier is for.


If you wanted to experiment with different electric guitar effects, or you were interested in performing in public with your amp, it would make more sense.

Croaky Keith
03-22-2016, 03:32 AM
Amongst my little collection, I have one of these (15),
http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B005LYUTWY?ref_=pe_385721_37038051_TE_3p_dp_1
& it is OK for home use practicing.

(I also have a Honeytone mini amp (34), & a Roland Micro Cube GX (120))

Kyle23
03-22-2016, 03:33 AM
I'm with Anthony on this one.

You have an acoustic-electric uke.
The natural acoustic tone is the best tone. Getting an acoustic amp is purely for performing in an environment where the ukulele itself is not loud enough.

People don't usually plug in their acoustic instrument into an acoustic amp for the sake of practice at home. That's not usually what an amplifier is for.


If you wanted to experiment with different electric guitar effects, or you were interested in performing in public with your amp, it would make more sense.

If I'm ever looking for an electric Uke, I'm messaging you, kissing! I've seen you dropping knowledge all morning on the subject. Good stuff.

kissing
03-22-2016, 03:46 AM
Thanks Kyle... UAS for the last 8 years or so has taken me on a very diverse (and expensive) journey... it is not easy to remember absolutely every ukulele that has come and left the collection! The numbers frighten me sometimes.

Rllink
03-22-2016, 03:54 AM
Well to be brutally honest you don't need an amplifier to practice at home. In fact home practice is FAR better without an amplifier. Less likely to annoy your neighbours or even family. One of the ADVANTAGES of solid body instruments is that you can practice at home and make very little noise.

Save your money until you have a requirement for public performance.

AnthonyNot knowing where the OP is at in his journey, I might agree with you to some extent. However, at some point that might not be so true. I have a Vox Mini3, and I can plug a headset into it, which disables the speakers. It has about fifteen different effects built into it, and I have a ball playing different songs with the different effects, playing with the tone, the gain, and whatever else I want to do with it. But I also have a Marshall amp that does not have those features, and it is in fact an obnoxious piece of equipment if not used in the right environment. So, just saying, the new amps these days have more uses than just cranking up the decibels. Vox Mini3, $119, and can run on batteries. I like it.

kissing
03-22-2016, 04:07 AM
Ok.. limiting myself to that particular website and your budget, here are some amps in your price range that could be suitable for your needs:

1. Roland Mobile AC Acoustic Chorus Guitar Amp
http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/Roland-MOBILE-AC-Acoustic-Chorus-Guitar-Amp/MNY

This one is very versatile and excellent because:
-Roland amps have great quality sound
-They're built tough
-Can use batteries or an adapter
-Has more than 1 channel (option for mic)
-Reverb and Chorus effects, very handy if you want to vary your sounds
-Versatile selection of inputs and outputs, such as headphones, etc

This one is probably one of the most versatile options if you want a purely acoustic amp under 200 Euros.


2. Fender Acoustasonic 15
http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/Fender-Acoustasonic-15-Acoustic-Guitar-Combo-Amp/P9O

I can give a very detailed description of this amp, because I actually own one! It's a great sounding amp!

-Plenty of power (for intended purposes)
-Treble/Mid/Bass knobs work very well for tweaking and generating natural sounds. It gives you a more refined control than Roland's single Tone knob.
-Has XLR Microphone jack, which is very handy. It works better than the 1/4 inch instrument input that the Roland has
-Same versatile inputs/outputs (eg: Headphones, mp3 player input)

Disadvantage: cannot be battery powered.

Overall, very good value and performance if you want a simple acoustic amp, and you have no need for battery-powered portability.



3. Vox Mini3 G2
http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/Vox-MINI3-G2-Modeling-Guitar-Amplifier-Ivory/QQ8

This one is not an "Acoustic amp". It's an electric guitar amp.
Compared to my purely acoustic amps, it is not as well suited at producing a pure, natural acoustic tone. However, if you tweak the settings just right, you can get pretty close (eg: Using the BT Clean or LINE channel).

However, it is a VERY useful amp. I use one myself and this is my goto amp if I am taking an amp outdoors.

-MANY different sound options - this is a modelling amp for emulating many different sounds on an electric instrument. It means hours of fun on your ukulele, getting it to sound like anything. Sometimes it's just fun to go all heavy-metal on an ukulele. There are plenty of clean tones that would work for acoustic instruments

-Built-in effects: Chorus, flanger, tremolo, reverb, etc.

-Can be battery operated - very handy when you are outside

You get a ton of features at a small price. However the con is that it is not designed to be an Acoustic amp, so it won't sound quite as 'natural' as the actual acoustic guitar amps. But that's a small price to pay for the plethora of different sounds you can produce.



4. Roland Microcube
http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/Roland-MICRO-CUBE-GX-Guitar-Amplifier-Red/TXQ

Very similar features as the Vox amp.
It's a matter of preference which brand you go for, or which set of features appeals to you more.

I used to own a Microcube, before I gave it away to someone who needed it more than me. I now own a Vox Mini 3. I can't really decide which I like better - they're same-same, but different ;)

ohmless
03-22-2016, 06:17 AM
another inexpensive option is the blackstar fly 3. good clean sound, expandable and uses batteries. Don't know how it sounds with high gain or pedals though.

personally I like acoustic instruments if I am looking for a traditional uke sound. I am currently saving up for a Vox ac4 because it is the best less expensive tube amp for rock with gain.

Martynas
03-22-2016, 07:18 AM
ok Thank you :) btw is that uke ok for the first instrument in my life?

Wicked
03-22-2016, 07:28 AM
Take a look at the Yamaha THR5A. It can run on batteries, and is less expensive than the Roland AC33. (Though not as classy looking.)

Rllink
03-22-2016, 08:43 AM
3. Vox Mini3 G2
http://www.gear4music.nl/en/Guitar-and-Bass/Vox-MINI3-G2-Modeling-Guitar-Amplifier-Ivory/QQ8

This one is not an "Acoustic amp". It's an electric guitar amp.
Compared to my purely acoustic amps, it is not as well suited at producing a pure, natural acoustic tone. However, if you tweak the settings just right, you can get pretty close (eg: Using the BT Clean or LINE channel).

However, it is a VERY useful amp. I use one myself and this is my goto amp if I am taking an amp outdoors.



;)How do you determine that it is an acoustic amp? What makes it an electric guitar amp, and makes it not an acoustic guitar, or ukulele, amp? Why is it your go to amp if you are taking it outdoors?

Croaky Keith
03-22-2016, 09:00 AM
...... btw is that uke ok for the first instrument in my life?

I would say so, lots of people have to start with a lesser uke. :)

ricdoug
03-22-2016, 09:10 AM
My new favorite inexpensive battery powered sound system, The Samson Expedition Escape. This puppy is LOUD AND CLEAN! Up to 20 hours on a single charge. I ran mine hard yesterday for 3 hours and two of the three green battery charge lights lights were still lit. I'm thinking real world it would run 5-6 hours on a charge at almost full power. Very light, as it weighs only 8.5 pounds 15.75” X 10.5” X 10.5” makes for very small footprint. It is speaker stand mountable, for more coverage. The 6' full range driver and 1” compression driver give it exceptional frequency range bandwidth. It has built in bluetooth, a 1/4” input and a 1/8” input. There's a USB jack to charge your phone at 1 AMP/HR capacity. The carrying handle cavity will hold a smart phone or MP3 player. The 1/8” input would work for Keyboards or Active pickup acoustic instruments. I used an old Samsung Galaxy II for backing tracks through the 1/8” jack. I then used my Samsung Galaxy S III microphone app through the Bluetooth, as the S III has an exceptional condenser mic built in. I plugged my passive pickup 'ukulele into my belt mounted Line6 Pocket Pod and then into the 1/4” input. It performed like a champ. I could pack the entire system into a backpack. Ric

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/Sampson1.jpeg

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/sampson2.jpeg

ricdoug
03-22-2016, 09:13 AM
http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/sampson3.jpeg

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/sampson4.jpeg

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/sampson5.jpeg

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/sampson6.jpeg

ricdoug
03-22-2016, 09:28 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e3cS5UXEXBc

kissing
03-22-2016, 10:14 AM
How do you determine that it is an acoustic amp? What makes it an electric guitar amp, and makes it not an acoustic guitar, or ukulele, amp? Why is it your go to amp if you are taking it outdoors?

Manufacturer's description of purpose.
Acoustic amps and electric guitar amps are made a bit differently to suit the respective instruments.

Eg: acoustic amps (and bass amps and keyboard amps) have a wider frequency response to better capture the natural highs and lows of acoustic sounds. Their internal preamps and modelling components are designed to handle the input of acoustic electric instrument signals and output thusly.

Electric guitars have different pickups - magnetic pickups. Their frequency response is not as wide as that on the piezo or transducers found on acoustic electric instruments. You typically find that electric guitar amps have more stronger mids, and cut the treble and bass frequency response with the intention of shaping and modelling the "electric" tone, as opposed to "acoustic" tone.

Obviously you can use an acoustic instrument through an elecrroc guitar amp, or an electric guitar through an acoustic amp if you want, but its not the what the respective amps were ideally designed to handle. You wont do any harm, but an acoustic instrument's tone will sound a bit like an electroc guitar through an electric guitar amp, etc.

The Vox is a very versatile amp on the go. I play electric guitar as well as ukulele. It sounds decent no matter what I plug into it. It's small, has a ton of features, runs on batteries and is LOUD for its size. Of course, for purely acoustic applications, its not the most "acoustically natural" sounding amp, being an electric guitar modelling amp.. but the sound is usable enough for my amateur purposes.

My acoustic electric ukes and guitars sound OK thru it.
Of course if I had a battery powered acoustic amp like the Roland AC33, it would one-up it as a portable acoustic amp... but the costs. And furthermore, I lose the electric guitar modelling and effects with a purely acoustic amp

The Roland Micro cube is a competitor. However when I bought my Vox Mini 3, I was able to directly compare it to the Roland Micro Cube gx.. I chose the Vox because it blew it away in terms of strength and clarity.

Rllink
03-22-2016, 11:49 AM
Manufacturer's description of purpose.
Acoustic amps and electric guitar amps are made a bit differently to suit the respective instruments.

Eg: acoustic amps (and bass amps and keyboard amps) have a wider frequency response to better capture the natural highs and lows of acoustic sounds. Their internal preamps and modelling components are designed to handle the input of acoustic electric instrument signals and output thusly.

Electric guitars have different pickups - magnetic pickups. Their frequency response is not as wide as that on the piezo or transducers found on acoustic electric instruments. You typically find that electric guitar amps have more stronger mids, and cut the treble and bass frequency response with the intention of shaping and modelling the "electric" tone, as opposed to "acoustic" tone.

Obviously you can use an acoustic instrument through an elecrroc guitar amp, or an electric guitar through an acoustic amp if you want, but its not the what the respective amps were ideally designed to handle. You wont do any harm, but an acoustic instrument's tone will sound a bit like an electroc guitar through an electric guitar amp, etc.

The Vox is a very versatile amp on the go. I play electric guitar as well as ukulele. It sounds decent no matter what I plug into it. It's small, has a ton of features, runs on batteries and is LOUD for its size. Of course, for purely acoustic applications, its not the most "acoustically natural" sounding amp, being an electric guitar modelling amp.. but the sound is usable enough for my amateur purposes.

My acoustic electric ukes and guitars sound OK thru it.
Of course if I had a battery powered acoustic amp like the Roland AC33, it would one-up it as a portable acoustic amp... but the costs. And furthermore, I lose the electric guitar modelling and effects with a purely acoustic amp

The Roland Micro cube is a competitor. However when I bought my Vox Mini 3, I was able to directly compare it to the Roland Micro Cube gx.. I chose the Vox because it blew it away in terms of strength and clarity.The reason I asked, is that I've been doing some busking this winter, and I've been using the Vox Mini3. This is my first time doing anything like that, so I'm still learning.

Tootler
03-22-2016, 12:59 PM
My new favorite inexpensive battery powered sound system, The Samson Expedition Escape. This puppy is LOUD AND CLEAN! Up to 20 hours on a single charge. I ran mine hard yesterday for 3 hours and two of the three green battery charge lights lights were still lit. I'm thinking real world it would run 5-6 hours on a charge at almost full power. Very light, as it weighs only 8.5 pounds 15.75” X 10.5” X 10.5” makes for very small footprint. It is speaker stand mountable, for more coverage. The 6' full range driver and 1” compression driver give it exceptional frequency range bandwidth. It has built in bluetooth, a 1/4” input and a 1/8” input. There's a USB jack to charge your phone at 1 AMP/HR capacity. The carrying handle cavity will hold a smart phone or MP3 player. The 1/8” input would work for Keyboards or Active pickup acoustic instruments. I used an old Samsung Galaxy II for backing tracks through the 1/8” jack. I then used my Samsung Galaxy S III microphone app through the Bluetooth, as the S III has an exceptional condenser mic built in. I plugged my passive pickup 'ukulele into my belt mounted Line6 Pocket Pod and then into the 1/4” input. It performed like a champ. I could pack the entire system into a backpack. Ric


+1 for the Samson Expedition series PA. I have the XP106. It has four inputs; an XLR/TS combo socket for mic or guitar, a line in socket either as a 3.5mm or 6mm jack, a USB socket which takes a wifi dongle to connect to a Samson wireless mic which comes with the XP106w variant and finally a bluetooth input. Each has its own volume control. The amp is 100w and there's plenty volume available. I've used it with a Shure PG81 condenser mic to pickup my voice and uke and it works just great. The tone quality is excellent. All in all an excellent personal PA amp. It has a sealed lead acid battery and Samson claim 20 hours on a full charge but I suspect in real life conditions somewhat less but still plenty for a gig or busking session.

GregT
03-22-2016, 06:06 PM
Very recently, I think about two months back, Acoustic Guitar magazine had an issue where much of it was devoted to amps. Useful info for anyone with an interest. I would also suggest you check out some of the acoustic guitar Internet forums/boards....lots of good info.

natchez
03-23-2016, 12:49 PM
The reason I asked, is that I've been doing some busking this winter, and I've been using the Vox Mini3. This is my first time doing anything like that, so I'm still learning.

If the amp is for busking, and you like the Vox Mini 3, the Vox Mini 5 adds two nice features- a variable power function 5w, 1.5w, .1 w, and it has a rhythm feature to give you some accompaniment. Otherwise, it is much like the Mini 3. If you go straight through the amp, it is not too bad at all for an acoustic/electric- pretty clean sound.