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Laidback1
03-25-2016, 05:24 AM
Just bought a new Ohana BK35 (solid mahogany baritone). For the money $299, it's a really good Uke. I'm primarily a guitar player and the Standard Baritone tuning DGBE comes in handy for transitioning my playing to the Ukulele; however, was wondering how do most people tune the Baritone? Standard or gCEA (or GCEA)? What tuning are the available online lessons typically done in. Is there an advantage of one tuning over the other?

Finally, can anyone recommend some good lessons for Baritone either online or DVD?

Sorry for all the questions, just trying to get a good start.

Mark

70sSanO
03-25-2016, 05:28 AM
I tune my baritone to DGBE, just like a guitar because it reminds me of a guitar when I play it. I probably would never tune it to C. For C tuning I use a tenor or concert ukulele.

John

PhilUSAFRet
03-25-2016, 05:32 AM
I'm of the opinion that the only reason most people tune a baritone to GCEA or gCEA is that they do not know guitar tuning and want to be able to play it like their other uke sizes. Other than that, I'm not aware of any advantage to doing that tone wise unless you just want it to sound more uke like and less guitar like.

Down Up Dick
03-25-2016, 05:39 AM
My Kala baritone is tuned to DGBD (to use with slide); I love it's deep sound. I haven't done much with the slide yet though because I've been busy with other stuff.

I mostly like open tuning, but some chords take some gittin' usta. I usually fingerpick the baritone though. :old:

JackLuis
03-25-2016, 11:09 AM
I just got a baritone a few weeks ago and liked the tuning. I have since experimented with retuning a tenor dGBE and found that very interesting. I played a couple of OS baritones up at the store, one linear and one re-entrant and liked the re-entrant for strumming. It had more of a Uke sound.

I've learned Baritone chord forms are not that hard to remember, seeing they are just Club tuning down a fourth. G=D A=E, etc. Even an old dog like me can learn new tricks.

Last night I was trying to shift "50 ways to leave your Lover" to Uke and realized that if I ignore the 5 and 6 strings, I could play the guitar chords that came with the song, on my G tuned axes. Now I'm just a strummer so there may be some differences but it isn't much.

kissing
03-25-2016, 01:08 PM
Dgbe would be the common tuning and purpose of the baritone. Tuning it gcea is a handy option if you feel like regular ukulele tuning.

As for teaching materials, is it really necessary?
Baritone is like guitar, and is like ukulele. Anything that applies to guitar and uke applies to baritone ukulele :)

EmmaQ
03-25-2016, 01:46 PM
I love baritone but have gotten frustrated with it since I prefer Fingerstyle and I don't have enough knowledge to take the tabs of a Fingerstyle guitar piece and fingerpick it with only 4 strings. Any help or advice out there?

kissing
03-25-2016, 03:22 PM
Any fingerstyle that applies to Ukulele applies to Baritone Ukulele.

Baritone isn't some new separate instrument. It's just a bigger ukulele transposed down a few pitches.
There's no one single method for it either. You can play it how ever way you like.

Ukulele Eddie
03-25-2016, 03:39 PM
I like my baritones set up for linear G tuning. I believe this is more common for the baritone, though some people certainly set them up re-entrant G.

EmmaQ
03-25-2016, 06:06 PM
To Kissing,
I play my baritone frequently, often fingerpicking pieces on it that I also play on my concert. That's no problem. I'm talking about finding the tabs for a cool guitar song, tabs written for 6 strings, and I don't know how to handle on the baritone those 2 strings that are missing, so to speak. There's no 5th and 6th strings for bass notes.

kissing
03-25-2016, 06:17 PM
To Kissing,
I play my baritone frequently, often fingerpicking pieces on it that I also play on my concert. That's no problem. I'm talking about finding the tabs for a cool guitar song, tabs written for 6 strings, and I don't know how to handle on the baritone those 2 strings that are missing, so to speak. There's no 5th and 6th strings for bass notes.

Basically you would ignore the 5th and 6th string - a baritone ukulele simply doesn't have them.
Sometimes you will have to adjust it a bit so it works on baritone ukulele. Usually the melodic parts of instrumentals are played on the first 4 strings, with the 5th and 6th being there for bass rhythm.

You'll have to use your own ears and modify slightly if needed.

That being said, by the same logic, all guitar tabs work on a regular ukulele with GCEA tuning (low-G) in the same way it would for a baritone ukulele.
You will just be playing it at a slightly higher pitch.

When it comes to a playability perspective, ukuleles are just 4-stringed guitars.

There's no magical method book that reconciles guitars with baritone ukuleles. You just need to appreciate they are similar instruments and a lot of things cross over.
Is a baritone ukulele a "lesser" instrument than guitar? I wouldn't say so - some things just work much better with 4 strings than 6.

FiL
03-26-2016, 02:35 AM
I do't much care for the lose tension of DGBE tuning on a baritone, so I tune mine up to EAC#F#. With a capo on the third fret I can play all the standard ukulele chords I know, and if a song is too high for me to sing, I can capo down a little to find the right key.

- FiL

Laidback1
03-27-2016, 04:21 AM
My Kala baritone is tuned to DGBD (to use with slide); I love it's deep sound. I haven't done much with the slide yet though because I've been busy with other stuff.

I mostly like open tuning, but some chords take some gittin' usta. I usually fingerpick the baritone though. :old:

what kind of strings are you using for slide work?

Down Up Dick
03-27-2016, 10:24 AM
All my strings are Aquila, but, as I said before, I haven't done much except a little noodling with it. I'm busy working on my banjos and trying to get back to my other (wind) instruments.

Never enough time. :old:

Camsuke
03-27-2016, 11:00 AM
I love baritone but have gotten frustrated with it since I prefer Fingerstyle and I don't have enough knowledge to take the tabs of a Fingerstyle guitar piece and fingerpick it with only 4 strings. Any help or advice out there?

Hi Emma,

A simple way to start adapting fingerstyle guitar pieces for Low G or DGBE ukulele is to use a guitar tab which is arranged for Dropped D (DADGBE) this will adapt quite easily because the guitar D chord is the same shape as the ukulele G chord. It makes it a lot easier to find those extra 2 bass string notes.
If you send me a guitar tab you'd like to adapt, I'll walk you through the process. Just drop me a PM.

EmmaQ
03-27-2016, 12:08 PM
Thanks Campbell! I appreciate your offer a lot. I'll PM you soon with a tab for the dropped d tuning.

EmmaQ
03-27-2016, 01:39 PM
Campbell, I "think" I just sent you a PM; I haven't done this enough to know for sure that I'm sending a PM correctly. Let me know either way. Thanks.

Braga2966
03-28-2016, 04:00 AM
Hi Emma,

A simple way to start adapting fingerstyle guitar pieces for Low G or DGBE ukulele is to use a guitar tab which is arranged for Dropped D (DADGBE) this will adapt quite easily because the guitar D chord is the same shape as the ukulele G chord. It makes it a lot easier to find those extra 2 bass string notes.
If you send me a guitar tab you'd like to adapt, I'll walk you through the process. Just drop me a PM.

How easy is it to find dropped D tuning tabs? Ultimate guitar app or a way of going about it?

I'm about to own a baritone and I was wondering in the mean time how can I practice on my tenor in a way that makes my transition to the baritone smoother? Do I start to rename the chords I play?

Down Up Dick
03-28-2016, 05:03 AM
How easy is it to find dropped D tuning tabs? Ultimate guitar app or a way of going about it?

I'm about to own a baritone and I was wondering in the mean time how can I practice on my tenor in a way that makes my transition to the baritone smoother? Do I start to rename the chords I play?

That's what I do, Braga. Irish Tenor Banjo is tuned Lo-G DAE, but my banjolele is tuned to Lo-C GDA. Both are tuned in fifths. Anyway, I play the banjolele in Lo-C GDA, but, in my mind, I call it Lo-G DAE. Since I'm playing solo, it doesn't make any difference what I call it.

So, play your tenor and think of it as being tuned to Lo-DGBE. You can even use baritone tabs. :old:

Strumdaddy
03-28-2016, 12:55 PM
Finally, can anyone recommend some good lessons for Baritone either online or DVD?

Sorry for all the questions, just trying to get a good start.

Mark

I'm not sure about "lessons" for baritone uke as such... but I'd recommend playing lots of songs you know and love to get the juices flowing.
Dr Uke has a vast array of great songs, and most have chords in baritone shapes (just click on the "BAR" bit)
http://www.doctoruke.com/songs.html
And don't be worried about asking questions - it's a pretty good way of finding out what you don't already know...
Many happy strummings...

Patrick Madsen
03-28-2016, 01:40 PM
How easy is it to find dropped D tuning tabs? Ultimate guitar app or a way of going about it?

I'm about to own a baritone and I was wondering in the mean time how can I practice on my tenor in a way that makes my transition to the baritone smoother? Do I start to rename the chords I play?

Just keep playing the chord shapes you use on your tenor. A chord shape is a chord shape. The only difference is the key the chord shape represents. The C shape on your tenor is a G in a baritone. F shape is a C in baritone with the G7th is a D7 on the baritone. This is if your tenor is tuned to C and the baritone tuned to G.

JackLuis
03-28-2016, 03:02 PM
How easy is it to find dropped D tuning tabs? Ultimate guitar app or a way of going about it?

I'm about to own a baritone and I was wondering in the mean time how can I practice on my tenor in a way that makes my transition to the baritone smoother? Do I start to rename the chords I play?

You can detune a tenor to DGBE and play baritone chords (down a fourth or up a fifth from C chord names). The strings will be a little loose but not too bad after a few days. I've done this with Fremont Black lines, D'Addario Carbons and Worth Browns. I think re-entrant dGBE sounds better so If you're high G just detune and you'll be dGBE. I did this because I was having trouble with fret spacing on my new Baritone and learning chord names etc.

Down load a Baritone chord chart and print it out and soon you'll be seeing the chords shapes as baritone or tenor names. It only took me a couple of weeks to get the hang of it. Starting out I just played my normal C chords shapes and it sounded a lot deeper but good. Now I try to play in key using baritone chord names.

Some songs I just change key as the muscle memory is too hard to break. Key of C now becomes key of G. Since I don't sing I have no problems, except playing.

Braga2966
03-28-2016, 06:08 PM
You can detune a tenor to DGBE and play baritone chords (down a fourth or up a fifth from C chord names). The strings will be a little loose but not too bad after a few days. I've done this with Fremont Black lines, D'Addario Carbons and Worth Browns. I think re-entrant dGBE sounds better so If you're high G just detune and you'll be dGBE. I did this because I was having trouble with fret spacing on my new Baritone and learning chord names etc.

Down load a Baritone chord chart and print it out and soon you'll be seeing the chords shapes as baritone or tenor names. It only took me a couple of weeks to get the hang of it. Starting out I just played my normal C chords shapes and it sounded a lot deeper but good. Now I try to play in key using baritone chord names.

Some songs I just change key as the muscle memory is too hard to break. Key of C now becomes key of G. Since I don't sing I have no problems, except playing.

Thanks for the suggestion, I have all low G on my Ukes so it should be easier I think. I'm hoping it's just a few weeks for the conversion in my head lol

JackLuis
03-29-2016, 08:12 AM
Thanks for the suggestion, I have all low G on my Ukes so it should be easier I think. I'm hoping it's just a few weeks for the conversion in my head lol

If you have an extra high G string, and who doesn't? You might try putting it on as the tenor sounds a little odd with a low D. It give the uke a uke sound to be re-entrant. I'm even thinking I might put a high d on my baritone so it is more Uke like and less guitar like. I payed a couple of OS baritones strung High and Low D up at my local Uke store and really preferred the sound of re-entrant baritone. I may change my mind on this again, again.

I just retuned on of my tenors to C6 from G because I wanted to hear what C6 sounded like (again) on this uke. Ewuuue, I just changed it back. G tuning is nicer sounding, IMHO.

studemobile
04-01-2016, 10:57 AM
One of the reasons I play the Ukulele is to accompany my sing with a limited vocal range. To this end I play Baritone Low G - C tuning. Using a capo as needed gives me additional flexibility. I also tune down 1/2 step to F# B D# G# for some songs. I like the feel of the strings also because they are not as floppy as the DGBE strings/tuning. Here is a set of me playing Baritone uke and baritone Banjo uke using Low G - C tuning:
https://soundcloud.com/grandpag123
grandpag123.com