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Down Up Dick
04-05-2016, 07:14 AM
Yesterday, I tried to play one of my stringed instruments, but I "played" so badly that I finally gave up. I couldn't find the frets and kept fretting the wrong strings, and my right hand fingers kept picking incorrect ones too.

Well, it was just a bad session I guess, and I've had lots of other bad days. But, every time I play badly, I wonder what would've happened if I had a concert to play. I wonder if Jake or any of the other pros have fumbly days.

A high school girlfriend sang "Tenderly" with our group. She got way off key, and she sounded awful. I felt so very bad for her.

Have any UUers ever had a really bad day at a gig or even an open mike?
:old:

DownUpDave
04-05-2016, 08:25 AM
I have had so many bad days it is a good thing I have a bad memory or I would give up...................what were talking about again :confused:

I was honored to be one of two people (sam13 and myself) to play ukulele at a backyard party Luis of LfdM had last year. We represented the ukulele end of his craft, there were some fabulous guitar players there. Half way through my song I flubbed a chord change and then my mind went blank. I had no idea of what chords to play, none, zero, nada. I never stopped, just played some different progression that probably sounded way off key and like crab. I panicked big time.

Playing a stringed instrument uses so many fine motor skills at such I high level it is amazing we can play at all. But just like any other endevour that we enjoy you shake of the bad days because the good days give us so much joy

Down Up Dick
04-05-2016, 08:49 AM
Once, I was playing French Horn in my High School District Orchestra. I think we were practicing one of the Brahms Symphonies. I don't remember which teacher was conducting, but he had me play a short part with a changed time signature over and over. I had practiced the part and knew it okay, but for some reason I just could not play it as required in the different rhythm. So, we went over and over it. He even "la-da-dahed" it, but the more I played in front of my contemporary musicians the more confused I became. I didn't know whether to get up and walk out or stomp on my French Horn (($$$$). Finally, he gave me a dirty look and went on to something else. I was relieved but felt very inferior--not a red letter day in my life.

Well, into each life some rain must fall . . . :old:

Pueo
04-05-2016, 09:08 AM
A few years ago I was asked to play a song at a fundraiser luau. I practiced and knew the song well. I had at this point played a couple of "gigs" with our ukulele group but never really had a solo performance. There were many professional musicians performing at this luau and as time wore on I began to feel more and more inadequate and felt increasingly apprehensive about performing. When they called me to the stage a couple of the other musicians remained on stage to back me up. I started out OK but drew a complete blank at the third verse. It was a horror show meltdown in my mind. My wife was recording it, and when I watched it back it was not as bad as I thought, which was a pretty good lesson to learn, but at the time all I was thinking was DISASTER!

Piecomics
04-05-2016, 09:14 AM
In a previous life I taught Kung fu and tai chi. A saying that was popular among that group was "an amateur practices to get it right, a professional practices until they can't get it wrong."

Booli
04-05-2016, 09:22 AM
I have had so many bad days it is a good thing I have a bad memory or I would give up...................what were talking about again :confused:

If i am having a bad day, I would rather LISTEN to others play uke rather than play myself. If I am angry or already frustrated and pick up a uke, it's likely only to make things worse and go downhill from there. (Lots of toxic stress in my life right now)

I'm honestly afraid that I'd end up smashing the uke like Pete Townsend did with his guitars, so rather than tempt myself, I listen instead of play.

Anger and frustration aside, once I listen to other folks play, quite often I forget about what was getting me down, and then I am able to become INSPIRED and then, later when I pick up the uke, playing becomes cathartic for me.

Not every day is a perfect day. In fact I've had so few lately, that I cannot remember the last one. So my best bet is to take a head-wind and turn it into a tail-wind by just doing something else besides playing at that moment, and the simple act of doing that provides an avenue for both FEELING and PLAYING better.

SoloRule
04-05-2016, 09:25 AM
Every day is a bad day for me.
I can play a piece perfectly (well at least I thought it's perfect) until someone ask me to play something.
My brain is so blank that I can't even remember the first note of a song that I have been practising just five minutes ago.
Wonder if I can ask for an Alzheimer test?
Its very scary and discouraging.

Rllink
04-05-2016, 09:30 AM
Yes I do have bad days. I usually muddle through anyway, and convince myself that the next time I'll do better. But I'm a long time golfer as well, and you learn playing golf that you have to leave the bad hits and holes behind you. If you dwell on a bad drive or a bad putt, or the one you just put in the sand, it just carries into the next one and the one after that. So I think that most golfers recognize that to some extent or another. Some deal with it better than others. I think that also applies to playing music.

Down Up Dick
04-05-2016, 09:32 AM
You're correct about not playing when you're upset or not feeling well, Booli, but what if you were a pro and had to play? :old:

Rllink
04-05-2016, 09:36 AM
You're correct about not playing when you're upset or not feeling well, Booli, but what if you were a pro and had to play? :old:I think that part of being a pro is learning to roll with it. I don't think that pros are perfect. No one is perfect. Pros make mistakes too. They just don't dwell on their mistakes to the point that they can't function anymore.

Pier
04-05-2016, 09:59 AM
In a previous life I taught Kung fu and tai chi. A saying that was popular among that group was "an amateur practices to get it right, a professional practices until they can't get it wrong."

that's it. I play bass guitar for work, and play in many bands, with different repertoires, and to be sure not to fall in the "black hole", I practice until my hands move and I don't have to think about what I'm playing.

for example, I play in a Blues Brothers tribute band, where basslines are always "written" and precise all along the song, usually with a specific pattern/riff on the chords, or changing only some bars.
I practice those songs until I can play them as a sequencer. one I start, I finish the song as it's written.

this is professional work, made to be 100% sure every time that the result will be perfect, even if it's a bad day or I'm sick. when the day is ok, I groove the hell out of my bass, when It's a bad day, I just play and get the job done.

playing an instrument is just mechanic, it's like a sport: your body needs to reach the point at which it moves without you telling him to do, it must be natural.

improvising is another beast, but it's not disconnected from the same method. to improvise you have to know exactly how that fret is going to sound, you have to know exactly how that sequence of notes is going to sound.
once you know scales and patterns and your hands move alone, you pass hours, days, months and years playing, searching for your style and your "melodies", your licks...
that's how a musician becomes recognizable.

PS: I'm also an opera singer, and with lyrics and melodies it's the same. when I study a piece of music, I section it, learn the lyrics and the music, and I can consider it learned once I don't have to "think" about the lyrics, but they comes one after one with the melody I'm singing.

UkieOkie
04-05-2016, 10:57 AM
I had a terrible night one night playing at a coffee house. The guy running the house sound didn't seem to care that I could hear neither my own voice nor the uke throught the monitors. It wasn't pretty. Oh well.

plunker
04-05-2016, 02:16 PM
Last Christmas I took my uke into work to play some christams carols. I really choked after the first one. Some times in practice, I play really badly. put it down for a few hours and play up to my skill level, notice I did not say well.

janeray1940
04-05-2016, 02:32 PM
For me, one bad day turned into a life lesson or two. In a past life - that would be many decades ago, as a teenager - I used to sing and was often the featured soloist in school productions. By contrast, I was also one of the most awkward, least popular girls in school - total tomboy, clueless about fashion and appearance, into all the wrong music and movies and whatever. So it was pretty weird to have the attention focused on me in the first place, let alone on a stage under a spotlight. But I loved being in choir and glee club and had really supportive teachers and didn't really give a darn what the other kids thought of me, so - I did it.

That, in and of itself, was probably a good lesson for an awkward teenager, but one incident stands out. I used to get horrible ear respiratory infections (still do occasionally - one man's cold usually turns into this girl's pneumonia) and one time I was hit really hard when I was scheduled to sing at two concerts, a daytime assembly for the students and a nighttime concert for the public. I couldn't hear, I barely had a voice, I could hardly stand up, and considering it was the 1970s, I probably had a bad perm and shiny red satin disco pants. But I insisted on doing my songs, sick or not, and - you guessed it, I choked. I was barely on key and of course, the entire auditorium of junior high-schoolers laughed and mocked me.

But you know what? I finished my song, went home and took a nap, and came back and did the whole thing again for the night concert because there was no way that I was going to let a roomful of teenage bullies intimidate me! I sang my song, stayed on key, got a nice round of applause, and continued to be the incredibly unpopular kid who always got the solos through the remainder of my secondary school days.

Kyle23
04-05-2016, 03:13 PM
I have my bad days. But it's usually when I think too much. I made a comparison video between two Ukes and it's such an easy song, one of the first I learned and I had to do like 10 retakes because I was thinking too much instead of just playing.

Down Up Dick
04-05-2016, 07:39 PM
I read somewhere that Louis Armstrong (or someone else) forgot the words to a song and just made up "words/sounds" to keep goin', and that's how scat was born. I like scat, especially when Louie or Ella Fitsgerald does it. I even use it (or whistle) when the words elude me.

I feel really good tonight, and that's when music's at it's best. I don't know what I'd do without it. :old:

70sSanO
04-05-2016, 07:52 PM
Years ago I was playing bass and but was also spending a lot if time playing guitar. For a period of 3-4 weeks I had a mental block as if my fingers forgot the bass spacing and it was a real struggle to play clean.

As for ukulele, I don't play for others that much, but when I do I generally follow what Pier said. Get to the point where it is almost mindless.

As for bad uke days when I'm playing on my own... sure, it happens more than I would like. Sometimes it is a rut because there is too much repetition of the same songs and other times I'm just inept. Sometimes changing ukulele size helps. I have a couple of 3 strings and not only are they easier but also give a different perspective on chording. At times they can border on comatose noodling.

John

Down Up Dick
04-05-2016, 08:14 PM
I don't know about changing sizes. The other night I was really playing my baritone Uke well and having a great time. But, then, later I grabbed up my 5 string banjo and was completely fumble fingered. I just simply couldn't play anything at all. I blame it on the different size fret spacing. The banjo was okay today though, but I fumbled again with my banjolele.

Perhaps it would be better to stick to one size instrument, but I think that would be pretty boring for me. :old:

kohanmike
04-05-2016, 09:34 PM
I make flubs and such often, I pause for moment until I get back on track. I've become comfortable with my flubs.

cpmusic
04-06-2016, 08:33 AM
I have that feeling today. I can move my chording fingers play some simple fingerstyle, but when strumming it feels like my right hand is moving through water or is under someone else's control.

I also play hammered dulcimer and several years ago I was hired to play a couple of tunes at a summer church service. One was a simplified version of "Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring," which I knew like the back of my hand. It wasn't even a "bad day" but I went off the rails about 1/4 of the way in and played several measures of something I'm sure Bach never imagined, but I kept going and managed to get back on track to finish. That was Not Fun, but it was a good lesson.

deschutestrout
04-06-2016, 08:53 AM
I had a terrible night one night playing at a coffee house. The guy running the house sound didn't seem to care that I could hear neither my own voice nor the uke throught the monitors. It wasn't pretty. Oh well.

Sometimes I ask "a little more talent though the monitors please" :-)

JJFN
04-06-2016, 09:25 AM
I think that part of being a pro is learning to roll with it. I don't think that pros are perfect. No one is perfect. Pros make mistakes too. They just don't dwell on their mistakes to the point that they can't function anymore. I think you can apply this to ukulele playing. A poll was taken of pro golfers, the question, what annoys you the most about playing with amateurs? The answer, the amateurs are too hard on themselves. As you said a pro makes a mistake and moves on, an amateur beats themselves up over a mistake. When I am having a bad uke day, I either stop and come back later or change ukuleles. Very interesting subject.

Down Up Dick
04-06-2016, 09:48 AM
I think you can apply this to ukulele playing. A poll was taken of pro golfers, the question, what annoys you the most about playing with amateurs? The answer, the amateurs are too hard on themselves. As you said a pro makes a mistake and moves on, an amateur beats themselves up over a mistake. When I am having a bad uke day, I either stop and come back later or change ukuleles. Very interesting subject.

I was like that when I played golf. I dwelt on my mistakes and bad holes throughout the whole 18 holes. When I got home, half drunk and very cranky, my day was ruined. Then one day, I said to myself: Why am I doing this? I don't HAFTA do it. So I quit and didn't play again for a long, long time. Then I did, and I was still horrible! And that was it.

I'm afraid I'm a bit that way with music too, when it's bad, but my music is a great deal better than my golf was. :old:

Ukejenny
04-06-2016, 10:48 AM
If you play/perform long enough, you are bound to have a suckass performance every now and then. I've not had it happen on uke, but I have had a clarinet shut down on me - water got in one of the tone holes and it just totally killed me. I tried everything to get it out. And not a swab in site. Also, I was playing flute once and got tickled - cutting up a little with the guy beside me and we both got to snickering, and then could hardly play. But, as always, onward and upward.

Pier
04-06-2016, 02:49 PM
I think that part of being a pro is learning to roll with it. I don't think that pros are perfect. No one is perfect. Pros make mistakes too. They just don't dwell on their mistakes to the point that they can't function anymore.

that's 100% true. mistakes are made probably in every performance, even of the biggest artists out there... in fact even the best singer has the autocue :P usually is disguised as a monitor cabinet in front of the singer's "place" (when he/she has a free position, the monitor/autocue is in the front center of the stage).

one of my teachers taught me an important lesson, while doing reading exercises: when you make a mistake, don't stop, go ahead like if you didn't make that mistake.

it's a common error, while studying, to stop at a mistake and restart, or repeat the mistaken part in the correct way. doing so, you learn to stop at a mistake, and get used to it, so while playing, you can't just pass over the mistake, but your brain tells you to stop and correct the error.

when you play in a band context it's easy to pass by, and 90% of the time the mistake is not heard by the audience, and (in particular), music continues to play.

solo artists learn to "smile" (or do a funny face) when they make a mistake: it tells the audience that they know it, mistakes happen, so just laugh about it.

Booli
04-06-2016, 04:08 PM
You're correct about not playing when you're upset or not feeling well, Booli, but what if you were a pro and had to play? :old:


I guess I'd have to figure it out. Getting paid for doing my music would certainly change lots of things for me right now, since my music is primarily to serve my own cathartic and expressive needs.

Music is my Sanctuary.

Once it becomes a 'job', then it's a whole different ball game.

drbekken
04-06-2016, 11:38 PM
As a jazz pianist, I have played pro gigs since I was a teenager in the late 70s. There have been ups and downs, to put it mildly. Sometimes, my fingers feel like logs, unable to move the way I want them to, other times, the chord changes may disappear from my mind, or I may have trouble with the instrument or the sound gear. Anything can and will happen. There are also days when I may be so disgusted with music in general that the mere thought of playing is downright repulsive. I may go for days or weeks without touching the piano, or the uke, or the guitar...I just want silence... However, I know for a fact that all this will be forgotten the very instant everything clicks; when my mind, heart and body seem to be one with the instrument and the audience. It's an incredible feeling, and it makes me endure the bad days quite easily. When I go into heavy practice periods, I make a point of always doing some playing; even when I feel nothing works. The sun's gonna shine in my back door one day, for sure.

(I haven't yet played a solo ukulele gig, though. Go figure.)

Rllink
04-07-2016, 03:43 AM
Back to my golf analogy, when you watch the pros, they can make a bad shot into a good one. I saw Phil Mickelson hit a ball off of a patio and it came up a foot from the hole. He birdied it. Maybe the difference between a pro and us mortals is what they do with their flubs.

A friend of mine who does a lot of busking told me one time that if you make a mistake keep making it. People will think is supposed to be that way. When I make mistakes, I tend to laugh at myself. I mean, out loud. That is how I cope with them. I don't usually get flustered or upset with myself. If I miss a chord change, or sing the lyrics a little wrong, I just keep going. What the heck. When you're singing "Bottle of Wine", who really knows if it is supposed to be "pain in my head, bugs in my bed, or the other way around. You hit a G instead of a G7, no one is going to catch it. But I've played for people at times and screwed it all up. And when that happens I get to laughing at myself for being so silly. I once was playing a song for some people at an open mic and I had to stop and tell them that I was screwing it up on purpose. They laughed. I asked them if they wanted me to try it again, and they all clapped and agreed that I should do it again. So I did, and the second time was great. They loved it. Everyone loved it. So I think that the embarrassment comes from feeling foolish, and the best way to keep from being embarrassed is to not be foolish when you make mistakes.

Kyle23
04-07-2016, 03:58 AM
I was like that when I played golf. I dwelt on my mistakes and bad holes throughout the whole 18 holes. When I got home, half drunk and very cranky, my day was ruined. Then one day, I said to myself: Why am I doing this? I don't HAFTA do it. So I quit and didn't play again for a long, long time. Then I did, and I was still horrible! And that was it.

I'm afraid I'm a bit that way with music too, when it's bad, but my music is a great deal better than my golf was. :old:

I was expecting this story to have a good ending about how you realized you shouldn't be hard on yourself. Instead, it's about how you just quit hahaha, that was a surprise.

JMort847
04-07-2016, 04:44 AM
While I agree that you shouldn't do things when you're not feeling well, mentally or physically, I find picking up a uke and playing chords help take the edge off. There's something about the sound of a uke that brightens my day!

Down Up Dick
04-07-2016, 05:36 AM
While I agree that you shouldn't do things when you're not feeling well, mentally or physically, I find picking up a uke and playing chords help take the edge off. There's something about the sound of a uke that brightens my day!

Yeah, I agree, but I suppose it depends how bad or sick one feels. Try gettin' old . . . :old:

bullet08
04-07-2016, 06:30 AM
read somewhere, as we grow old, mood, stress, and things like that will interfere with general practice. usually, if possible to play, do simple things that can be done right and if that's not possible, take a day off. usually when i'm too stressed to play, not uke but bagpipes, i would just block everything out.. it's easy to do that with pipes since they are so darn loud. same thing with martial arts. just block things out for that hour or two or three. of course, really bad days are really bad.. then rum and coke works pretty well.

Down Up Dick
04-07-2016, 06:48 AM
This morning, I couldn't put my shoes and socks on until I had waited a bit and limbered up. I can't imagine doing some martial arts. Old age ain't for sissies.

But you're correct about playing music to offset feeling bad.

I love bagpipes and Celtic music. I really wish I could play BPs. I was gonna buy a practice chanter at one time, but I live in a condo and decided against it. There was a guy who usta practice them in a closed super market parking lot. On TV, he said he kept being chased from practice place to practice place. Another guy said he played them at the beach during the winter. I guess it's just a BP drawback.

And, yet, a person can hook his wired guitar up and blow the windows out. Good music is in the ear of the listener. :old:

UkeInTW
04-08-2016, 04:49 PM
I am not good enough to perform in any capacity, but still wonder how I could ever even attempt to, when I am so inconsistent. I can practice parts of a song over and over and over, yet still find times I dont fret it cleanly, or on my picking hand, may accidentally brush an adjacent string or miss a string. So, cant develop much consistency to not make a mistake, even practicing. I know part is repetition, but even with lots of that, I still struggle to play mistake free. So, dont think I will ever get to the level where I could perform in front of an audience in a finger picking style. Anyone with any special tips to improve one's consistency and not make as many mistakes? I know it is practice and more practice, and of course, correct practice.

Nickie
04-08-2016, 05:28 PM
Wow there are some great stories here! I don't feel so bad now.
I'm still trying to forget my 1st attempt at a public performance. The Youth Department wanted to put on a Christmas show for the congregation of my church. So I practiced with the kids, leading with my uke. We worked until we nailed every song, it was perfect. Then showtime came and I sat on a stool next to the guitarist (a damn good one at that). We started and I forgot every single chord in every single song. I couldn't even remember the lyrics to Away In a Manger for cripes sake. My hands shook, my vision went blurry, I got short of breath, and I sweat like a mule in a cornfield in July. So I faked it, smiled a lot, and the kids carried me through. Worst case of stage fright in the world, I wanted to cry, but not a single soul complained. I recovered after about two hours of self flagellation, which isn't even recommended in my church....

Teek
04-08-2016, 10:04 PM
If I'm having a crappy day of practice, I just work on very slow no tempo practice, as from Jamie Andreas "Guitar Principles". That lets me work on being more correct so that I am actually getting some good practice. If things start to click I'll go work on something else at tempo.

I was a Michael Crawford fan back in the 80's and 90's. He was the original Phantom in Lloyd Webber's play, from the West End to Broadway to Los Angeles. Somebody asked him in an interview "Do you ever forget the words?" His immediate reply was "Not when I have them in my hands". Apparently he could get pretty distracted. Sarah Brightman and Dale Kristien (both played Christine opposite him) would often have to feed him his lines. Crawford was phenomenal in the role and he had a good attitude about it. I met him a couple of times and he had an offbeat but good sense of humor.

Rllink
04-09-2016, 05:31 AM
I am not good enough to perform in any capacity, but still wonder how I could ever even attempt to, when I am so inconsistent. I can practice parts of a song over and over and over, yet still find times I dont fret it cleanly, or on my picking hand, may accidentally brush an adjacent string or miss a string. So, cant develop much consistency to not make a mistake, even practicing. I know part is repetition, but even with lots of that, I still struggle to play mistake free. So, dont think I will ever get to the level where I could perform in front of an audience in a finger picking style. Anyone with any special tips to improve one's consistency and not make as many mistakes? I know it is practice and more practice, and of course, correct practice. If you wait until you can play perfectly, you're never going to perform. When I first performed, and when I say perform I mean coffee shop gigs and open mics, at first I didn't even notice the people watching and listening. I was so involved in my singing and playing, that it is as if I was playing all by myself. I just focused on what I was doing.

Last summer when I got invited to play at some backyard neighborhood get togethers, usually a lot of people wanted to sing or clap along with the music, which does not bother me at all. In fact, I like it when they do. It makes it easy, because if I forget the words, there is always someone singing along that knows them. If I can play the chords, I can follow along with the lyrics usually. Sometimes I can pull off a little fingerpicking and melody if I don't have to think about it too much. The more I have done it however, the more I have gotten used to interacting with the people who are watching and listening.

I have to say here, that I started playing and performing for other people early on in my ukulele journey. Most definitely before I was very good. And that actually happened by chance and not by plan, which is a funny story in itself. I took up playing the ukulele to face that fear, and I was determined to face it early on. I was scared to death, I knew that I wasn't a great ukulele player and singer, but I wanted to perform enough to make myself overcome that fear. I love it now. I have great fun. But those first few times, it was not pretty. There were a lot of stumbles. But great performers do not start out great. They get there by making mistakes. I don't care how much you practice, or how good you are in your living room, when you get out in front of people the first couple of times, it is a whole different ball game. No one steps up to home plate the first time and hits a homer. But if you don't go out and do it, it is never going to happen.

Down Up Dick
04-09-2016, 06:15 AM
Rollie, I really admire your courage and your perspective on things. I usta think it was great that you only had one ukulele for a long time. And your post above is spot on, though I don't think I got the guts.

I usta play in front of people and even on stage, but that was a long time ago. I envy your nerve and attitude. :old:

UkeInTW
04-10-2016, 06:56 AM
While I agree with your post, one also needs to be at a certain level of proficiency to perform. But, I certainly understand and agree that one needs to start doing something to feel more comfortable at it, like almost any endeavor.

bullet08
04-10-2016, 07:38 AM
back when competing in pipes, we would break down to smallest bit and fix that problem before doing anything else. playing the same part over and over with the mistake only reinforce the mistake..

Inksplosive AL
04-10-2016, 08:56 AM
In my chosen profession a bad day for me can end up being a bad tattoo forever for you. I made a promise to myself years ago if I'm having that bad of a day I will simply not work on anyone. Then there is the artist thing or perhaps manopause when we artists think everything we do could be or should be much better. On the other side of things Ive surprised myself in lines at gas stations and supermarkets looking at someones ink thinking to myself DAMN I wish I was that good. The surprise comes when they turn and say hey Al remember this and I realize I'm getting jealous of my own ability.

Did a few organ recitals when I was younger, band for a year and chorus through jr high. Ive worked the front booth or window booth at almost every shop Ive ever worked in. I still have issues playing any instrument for anyone. Even my lady doesn't really know what or if I play much of anything unless she hears me quietly noodeling away watching TV.

Funny compared to permanently modifying a persons skin flubbing a song is peanuts yet most embarrassing.

~peace~

Kyle23
04-10-2016, 02:11 PM
In my chosen profession a bad day for me can end up being a bad tattoo forever for you. I made a promise to myself years ago if I'm having that bad of a day I will simply not work on anyone. Then there is the artist thing or perhaps manopause when we artists think everything we do could be or should be much better. On the other side of things Ive surprised myself in lines at gas stations and supermarkets looking at someones ink thinking to myself DAMN I wish I was that good. The surprise comes when they turn and say hey Al remember this and I realize I'm getting jealous of my own ability.

Did a few organ recitals when I was younger, band for a year and chorus through jr high. Ive worked the front booth or window booth at almost every shop Ive ever worked in. I still have issues playing any instrument for anyone. Even my lady doesn't really know what or if I play much of anything unless she hears me quietly noodeling away watching TV.

Funny compared to permanently modifying a persons skin flubbing a song is peanuts yet most embarrassing.

~peace~

I'm an artist myself, not on tattoos, but I have no idea how you guys do it. I'm way too hard on myself and am never completely satisfied in my finished drawings, so I can't even imagine working on someones tattoo. Do you ever find yourself not 100% satisfied with permanent work?