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Marks1stwife
04-06-2016, 11:46 PM
I don't know if this is in the correct place, my Baritone "eats" Aquila wound strings, is there a more robust, nice sounding, string sets out there.
The 2 wound strings always start unwinding at the 3rd fret, usually after about 6 songs
It is has Lower D sets of strings (or do I need a luthier to see if the fret has a sharp edge,,,,,the 2 nylgut strings have no signs of wear)
Thanks for any advice
Gillian

SailingUke
04-07-2016, 01:16 AM
Wound strings do separate, but 6 songs sounds quick. I would have the fret checked. There are baritone sets with all unwound. I use Living Waters by Ken Middleton.

anthonyg
04-07-2016, 02:00 AM
Have the frets checked first. You can always change strings if you want but Aquila baritone strings last at least 12 months for me if not longer.

Anthony

Doc_J
04-07-2016, 02:05 AM
Have the frets checked first. You can always change strings if you want but Aquila baritone strings last at least 12 months for me if not longer.

Anthony

I've had the same experience as Anthony. Check your frets.

kissing
04-07-2016, 02:11 AM
Aquila wound strings are quite fragile. What you are experiencing is quite typical.

I use classical guitar strings.. the ADGB strings of a classical guitar set = dgbe on baritone uke. D'addario pro arte regular or light tension works well ;) Savarez if you want some extra volume

I dont think there is anything wrong with your uke

Marks1stwife
04-07-2016, 02:34 AM
Aquila wound strings are quite fragile. What you are experiencing is quite typical.

I use classical guitar strings.. the ADGB strings of a classical guitar set = dgbe on baritone uke. D'addario pro arte regular or light tension works well ;) Savarez if you want some extra volume

I dont think there is anything wrong with your uke

Thanks! I am only in a "little old lady group" of 6, 4 of which are quiet sopranos, so I don't need a huge amount of noise. I was concerned that the guitar strings may be too strong for the non-braced Baritone neck, but if you have had no problems I'll give it a go

billten
04-07-2016, 02:40 AM
Try the daddario titanium also, they have been pretty reliable for me.

mm stan
04-07-2016, 03:28 AM
Yes sharp frets may be the cause, if they feel sharp running your fingers across them, file them smooth
BTW, love your uu user name Gillian :)

70sSanO
04-07-2016, 03:52 AM
Thanks! I am only in a "little old lady group" of 6, 4 of which are quiet sopranos, so I don't need a huge amount of noise. I was concerned that the guitar strings may be too strong for the non-braced Baritone neck, but if you have had no problems I'll give it a go

Make sure the strings are classical guitar strings and not steel. You can also buy a single wound guitar strings if you like the other 2 Aquilas. Or if you follow the advice of kissing, you can use 4 strings from a set or just the A and D strings. But as others have said it sure sounds like there is a fret issue. I use Aquila concert strings on my baritone and the wound string is holding up fine.

John

bnolsen
04-07-2016, 04:51 AM
Aquila wound strings are quite fragile. What you are experiencing is quite typical.

I use classical guitar strings.. the ADGB strings of a classical guitar set = dgbe on baritone uke. D'addario pro arte regular or light tension works well ;) Savarez if you want some extra volume

I dont think there is anything wrong with your uke

is there a big difference in tension with the classical strings? don't want to screw up the neck on my baritone. I still have a pack of d'addario nyltech baritones waiting for the next string change and I like to play strings until they are really really dead.

Marks1stwife
04-07-2016, 04:59 AM
I've had the same experience as Anthony. Check your frets.

thanks guys I have had this set on for 4 weeks, put a capo on this morning and D G have separated
What is your opinion on replacing with guitar strings...Will the tension distort the neck?

Marks1stwife
04-07-2016, 05:04 AM
Yes sharp frets may be the cause, if they feel sharp running your fingers across them, file them smooth
BTW, love your uu user name Gillian :)
Chose this name as Gillian is really common and my surname is the most common! It is really hard coming up with a name unused by others!
Do I use a nail file or some fine sand paper
Thanks

Jon Moody
04-07-2016, 05:06 AM
thanks guys I have had this set on for 4 weeks, put a capo on this morning and D G have separated
What is your opinion on replacing with guitar strings...Will the tension distort the neck?

Not at all (taking into consideration that you're using classical guitar strings).

A classical guitar string and a ukulele string are both considered "tie end" strings. As long as the gauge that you're replacing the D and G strings with is the same, they're probably the exact same.

kissing
04-07-2016, 06:46 AM
is there a big difference in tension with the classical strings? don't want to screw up the neck on my baritone. I still have a pack of d'addario nyltech baritones waiting for the next string change and I like to play strings until they are really really dead.

Baritone ukulele strings ARE classical guitar strings. I'm amazed at the number of people who do not immediately make this connection.
Structurally, an ukulele is very much like a small, 4-stringed classical guitar.

If you use the ADGB strings from a classical guitar set, they are essentially the correct tension for use on a baritone uke and are identical.
There is no risk to the baritone ukulele. Classical guitars are braced in much the same way, and do not require truss rods like steel-string guitars do.


In fact, to go even further, if you use the DGBE strings from a classical guitar set, they tune up to GCEA on soprano/concert/tenor ukuleles!
Proof of this is that D'addario Pro-Arte's come in Classical and Ukulele sets.
The Concert Ukulele D'addario Pro-Arte set corresponds identically to the DGBE strings from the Pro-Arte Classical Guitar set (regular tension), except you get a wound string that you can use as low-G.

The Tenor Ukulele D'addario Pro-Arte set corresponds identically to the DGBE of the Pro-Arte Classical High Tension set.
If you have spare time - go look it up and see for yourself ;)


I primarily use low-G on my Soprano/Concert/Tenor ukuleles, and use classical guitar strings exclusively due to the wider availability of them, as well as better price and value (you can get 2 sets of ukulele length strings from a classical guitar set).

Furthermore, you get a lot more options in Baritone string selection if you use Classical Guitar sets. There is not as many readily available "baritone ukulele string" sets that I can just purchase locally.


So in summary.

Classical Guitar ADGB strings (regular tension) = DGBE on baritone ukulele
Classical Guitar DGBE strings (regular tension) = GCEA on soprano/concert/tenor
Classical Guitar DGBE strings (light tension) = GCEA on baritone ukulele

Obviously you can experiment with DGBE tuning on Tenor ukulele if you use ADGB from a Hard Tension Classical guitar set (higher tension to compensate for shorter scale length).

sopher
04-07-2016, 10:54 AM
I have always found the wound strings don't last very well, and now I only use non-wound strings on all my ukes. SouthCoastUkes makes sets of these for everything.

Sopher

anthonyg
04-07-2016, 01:02 PM
thanks guys I have had this set on for 4 weeks, put a capo on this morning and D G have separated
What is your opinion on replacing with guitar strings...Will the tension distort the neck?

You can try guitar strings if you want but I don't think that it will fix the problem long term if the problem is rough frets. I'd send the instrument to a luthier. You can cause more problems than you fix if you don't have an idea of what you are doing with frets.

Anthony

kissing
04-07-2016, 04:50 PM
Is "rough" frets really that widespread an issue? I have gone thru hundreds of ukes, including the cheapest ukes in existence.. and have never found it to be an issue.

Aquila wound strings on the other hand..

mm stan
04-07-2016, 09:26 PM
Chose this name as Gillian is really common and my surname is the most common! It is really hard coming up with a name unused by others!
Do I use a nail file or some fine sand paper
Thanks

Id make sure if the fret is sharp, if it is...id take as little off as possible before you remove too much
Could be at least as once or two swipes of a fret file.. sandpaper depends on the grit. Tape the fret board
To protect it on both sides of the fret. Yes 6 songs and two strings breaking, it could be the culprit.
Ive had vintage martin with sharp frets, even a custom..

anthonyg
04-07-2016, 11:55 PM
Is "rough" frets really that widespread an issue? I have gone thru hundreds of ukes, including the cheapest ukes in existence.. and have never found it to be an issue.

Aquila wound strings on the other hand..

If your wrecking strings in a few days then yes it is. I've had Aquila Nylgut strings on the same instrument for 12 months plus. Nylguts aren't really that fragile. I pick and fret harder than just about anyone here. I really SNAP the strings back and therefore fret pretty firmly too. I've never had problems with Nylguts including wound low G's and baritone strings.

Anthony

kissing
04-07-2016, 11:57 PM
If your wrecking strings in a few days then yes it is. I've had Aquila Nylgut strings on the same instrument for 12 months plus. Nylguts aren't really that fragile. I pick and fret harder than just about anyone here. I really SNAP the strings back and therefore fret pretty firmly too. I've never had problems with Nylguts.

Anthony

Anthony, I agree that Aquila Nylguts are nearly indestructible.

However, what we are discussing about are the Aquila WOUND strings, which are not nylguts.
These I have found to be rather fragile compared to most classical guitar wound strings (eg: D'addario)

anthonyg
04-08-2016, 12:04 AM
Anthony, I agree that Aquila Nylguts are nearly indestructible.

However, what we are discussing about are the Aquila WOUND strings, which are not nylguts.
These I have found to be rather fragile compared to most classical guitar wound strings (eg: D'addario)

I probably edited my post after you posted. I have wound low G Aquila strings on just about everything as well as baritone strings with 2 wound strings. I don't break them that quickly. Even the wound strings usually last 12 months for me.

Anthony

kissing
04-08-2016, 02:11 AM
Ahh I see.

Would it possible that it's also due to different playing styles?

anthonyg
04-08-2016, 02:46 AM
Ahh I see.

Would it possible that it's also due to different playing styles?

Well I'm a hard picker so I'm not sure what you guys are doing thats harder on strings than me. Are many of you using plectrums? That's not the frets though. If your wearing the strings on the frets then its the frets.

Anthony

Soundbored
04-08-2016, 03:31 AM
In fact, to go even further, if you use the DGBE strings from a classical guitar set, they tune up to GCEA on soprano/concert/tenor ukuleles!

I can't speak to the other sizes, because I haven't checked the numbers, but just to clarify that for soprano at least ukulele strings have unique diameters and unit weights. I agree that from the "normal tension" nylon classical guitar sets, you can use the 1st and 4th strings, no problem. But the 2nd and 3rd strings have too large of a diameter, and are fairly low in tension on a uke, as you can see in my chart. The fluorocarbon classical set fixes that, but the 1st string has too much tension, and mixing and matching from different classical sets is expensive.

In my experience, the most economical route for soprano low G is to buy actual ukulele string sets. And if your favorite doesn't come with a wound 4th string, buying guitar "D" strings separately online.

90049

kissing
04-08-2016, 05:11 AM
I respectfully disagree.

The relative pitch intervals between D-G-B-E and G-C-E-A are the same (ie: 4ths).
Hence, logic dictates that you will achieve an adequate overall tension if you tune up classical guitar DGBE strings up to GCEA on a shorter scale "guitar" (which is "ukulele").

Sure, there are "recommended" gauges, as you show on your chart.
However, we are talking about stringed instruments! There is a lot of variety in preference on how you want the tension on your strings.
Look at the world of guitars. There is a very wide spectrum of tensions - super duper light all the way to heavy. Heavy bottoms/Light tops.... Medium-Light, etc etc etc.

The ukulele also has just as wide a spectrum of tension preferences. In fact, I think it is wrong to name ukulele strings as "Soprano, Concert, Tenor".
They should be called Light, Medium, Heavy gauge and the different sized ukuleles should be treated as the same instrument at different scale lengths.
For example, you have short-scaled travel guitars, parlor guitars all the way up to full sized dreadnoughts. All the sizes are considered "guitars" of variable scale length, and you don't have guitar strings named "Travel guitar strings" or "Parlor guitar strings". You simply choose from the pool of different gauge "GUITAR STRINGS" that is appropriate for your needs.

The point I would like to drive home is, numbers and figures are merely recommendations. An average. A benchmark.
There's no need to treat it like some kind of restriction - it is merely a middle-ground from which to begin.
If you prefer your strings a bit lighter or heavier than the recommended figures, that is totally your call.



From personal experience, I have found DGBE strings work perfectly as GCEA strings on Soprano, Concert and Tenor ukuleles.
In fact, in my opinion, I think they result in a much more playable and practical tension than most strings that are actually sold as "Ukulele strings".
I find most "Tenor ukulele" strings to be too heavy on tenors for practical finger-picking, and most "Soprano ukulele" strings to be impractically floppy.

The DGBE of normal tension Pro-Arte Classical guitar strings corresponds identically to the "Concert Ukulele D'addario Pro-Arte" strings.
I find this to be the happy string for all seasons.

The overall tension on the strings also depends a lot on how your ukulele is setup.
If your ukulele has a particularly low setup, then all strings will feel a bit looser in comparison to an ukulele with a higher action setup.


Currently I have my Clearwater Soprano uke and Pono tenor both using the same DGBE Pro-Artes tuned to GCEA (low-G).
I have adjusted the action so that the tension feels perfect to play.

Hence my experience greatly differs from your's.
The easiest, simplest and arguable most economic way to use guitar strings on ukulele is tune the DGBE straight up to GCEA.
K-I-S-S

Jon Moody
04-08-2016, 06:21 AM
The overall tension on the strings also depends a lot on how your ukulele is setup.
If your ukulele has a particularly low setup, then all strings will feel a bit looser in comparison to an ukulele with a higher action setup.


Kissing, I agree with everything you said, except this point needs a bit of clarification.

Tension is a term thrown around loosely. What it refers to (especially when talking about strings) is the scientific tension that shows how much force is put on an instrument when a string is tuned to pitch. Factors involved in this are string weight, note frequency and scale length. A good/bad setup has no effect on tension.

What (I think) you're referring to is the stiffness, or pliability of the strings; how they feel under your fingers. A setup will definitely have an effect on the feel of the strings, as that correlates to how much/little force you have to exert to fret the notes. The string is still under the same tension, but will definitely feel different.

Otherwise, you're dead on. Ukulele strings are made of nylon. Classical Guitar strings are made of nylon. They're the same strings, as you've noted.

Soundbored
04-08-2016, 08:32 AM
From personal experience, I have found DGBE strings work perfectly as GCEA strings on Soprano, Concert and Tenor ukuleles.

...the DGBE of normal tension Pro-Arte Classical guitar strings corresponds identically to the "Concert Ukulele D'addario Pro-Arte" strings.

Yes, the D'Addario EJ65c "custom extruded" uke set appears to be identical to dgbe from their EJ45 normal tension nylon classical guitar set. I compared the tension numbers and unit weights, not just the diameters, which are irrelevant.

But I don't see a set for soprano that corresponds to any classical set they sell, maybe I missed it?

And I am not telling anyone what they can or can't do, or what "works" or doesn't. Merely looking into some of the points you brought up, there's really no need for being so defensive.

kissing
04-08-2016, 04:13 PM
Im not being defensive, I am just pointing out what I know.

Again, you limit your options to what the manufacturer lists

But I don't see a set for soprano that corresponds to any classical set they sell

I would like to emphasise that such restrictive thinking is unnecessary. There is nothing special about what a manufacturer markets as "Soprano" strings. Concert strings work just fine on Soprano ukes, and selling them as "concert ukulele strings" is just a marketing formality.

You can use Concert ukulele strings on tenor, and temor strings on concert depending on your string stiffness preferences!! And yes, you can use them on soprano too!

drbekken
04-08-2016, 08:40 PM
Ooooops....digression from thread will follow: If you want to use nylon guitar strings for soprano, buy single G, B and E strings (#3, 2, 1). The E string cut in two will be the outer G and A on the uke. The G becomes C, and the B becomes E on the soprano. Quite often, this is a great solution.

jollyboy
04-09-2016, 03:41 AM
Hi, I have a question. I'm getting a new baritone delivered next week (hopefully) and I was thinking of trying out some D'addario EJ65B Pro Arte Custom Extruded nylons on it. The set comes with wound third and fourth strings, which is something that I like (I have wound C and G strings on both my concert ukes). And it just seems more economical to buy a set that comes with the two wounds included rather than buying them separately. I'm slightly wary of nylon as a string material though - I've never tried it and it seems like everything else is marketed as being an improvement over it. I've read that it takes a loooong time for nylon strings to settle and that intonation can be uneven. Anyone care to put my mind at ease?

(Obviously, whether or not I like the actual tone of the strings is another issue :))

Marks1stwife
04-09-2016, 06:12 AM
Aquila wound strings are quite fragile. What you are experiencing is quite typical.

I use classical guitar strings.. the ADGB strings of a classical guitar set = dgbe on baritone uke. D'addario pro arte regular or light tension works well ;) Savarez if you want some extra volume

I dont think there is anything wrong with your uke

Do you find the nut needs a little widening to take the bigger strings of the guitar

kissing
04-09-2016, 06:20 AM
Hi, I have a question. I'm getting a new baritone delivered next week (hopefully) and I was thinking of trying out some D'addario EJ65B Pro Arte Custom Extruded nylons on it. The set comes with wound third and fourth strings, which is something that I like (I have wound C and G strings on both my concert ukes). And it just seems more economical to buy a set that comes with the two wounds included rather than buying them separately. I'm slightly wary of nylon as a string material though - I've never tried it and it seems like everything else is marketed as being an improvement over it. I've read that it takes a loooong time for nylon strings to settle and that intonation can be uneven. Anyone care to put my mind at ease?

(Obviously, whether or not I like the actual tone of the strings is another issue :))

Who are these people spreading such misinformation? Nylon is great material for string!

Nylon is perfectly fine as string material. It's the one that has been used the longest, ever since it replaced actual gut strings.

Those supposed "disadvantages" of nylon strings are not justified, as the same things apply to strings of all material.
All strings, be it nylon, nylgut or fluorocarbon take time to stretch out when brand new.
The issue of whether intonation is less accurate on nylon vs other materials is also ludicrous. Nylon strings are the most frequently used by professional musicians, including classical guitarists.

As a matter of personal preference, I prefer D'addario Pro-Arte clear nylon over Nylguts and Fluorocarbons.
No other string has the same amount of warmth and comfort when fingerpicked for me.


I believe D'addario Pro-Arte clear nylons are also Jake Shimabukuro's string of choice.

kissing
04-09-2016, 06:22 AM
Do you find the nut needs a little widening to take the bigger strings of the guitar
No.

The guitar strings used on ukuleles are not thicker than ukulele strings.
Ukulele strings ARE classical guitar strings. We're not using something that is too thick for ukuleles... what we are using are the equivalent to ukulele strings from a classical guitar set.

Marks1stwife
04-09-2016, 10:41 AM
No.

The guitar strings used on ukuleles are not thicker than ukulele strings.
Ukulele strings ARE classical guitar strings. We're not using something that is too thick for ukuleles... what we are using are the equivalent to ukulele strings from a classical guitar set.

Thankyou so much!
Wow I got a little spooked reading some other posts about using various strings for various ukes . There is a lot of talented info here! Many thanks to everyone for your input