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saltytri
04-07-2016, 06:43 PM
Whether bindings are purchased or cut in the shop from larger stock, they have to be accurately dimensioned for the particular instrument. Getting them to the right thickness is easy. Just run them through the thickness sander:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1551/26274728716_4e64fd48ba_c.jpg

Getting them to the right height is a little more work. In addition to the correct height, the edges need to be square with the flat side. I've been using a funky method that took too much time and finally got tired of it so a new fixture was in order.

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1619/26208259002_875d5b1eee_c.jpg

This clamps the binding strips between two straightedges that are 1/8" thick. The one on the right is fixed and the other slides laterally over a range of 1/2". The binding strips are placed in the slot between the two straightedges and the left one is slid firmly against them so they can't wobble from side to side. The sliding side is held in place with hex head screws.

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1493/26274730976_28193ae5f0_c.jpg

The whole assembly is then run under the thickness sander. There are always any number of ways to skin cat but this works well for me.

sequoia
04-07-2016, 07:11 PM
That is one sweet looking set-up. If I owned a thickness sander like that, that is exactly how I would do it. However, since I don't own a thickness sander, I just slap on the binding proud to the body and then thin it down with a sharp cabinet scraper to desired thickness. Only takes a couple minutes... By the way, that looks like cocobolo, my favorite binding. Real purty.

saltytri
04-07-2016, 07:37 PM
Like I said, there's more than one way to skin a cat. :) They still go on a bit proud but I like to get them as narrow as possible before bending. It just makes it easier.

++ on using the cabinet scraper for getting bindings flush on the top and sides. They're wonderful tools - once you learn how to sharpen them.

Michael Smith
04-07-2016, 09:10 PM
Thats is a nice jig. I have found that if I put through a dozen or so at one time I can hold them as they go through and they stay square without a jig.

Gary Gill
04-08-2016, 12:18 AM
Thats is a nice jig. I have found that if I put through a dozen or so at one time I can hold them as they go through and they stay square without a jig.

That has been my method too.

Timbuck
04-08-2016, 12:25 AM
Thats is a nice jig. I have found that if I put through a dozen or so at one time I can hold them as they go through and they stay square without a jig.
And me as well..I sometimes put some tape around them at the ends to hold them together

mikeyb2
04-08-2016, 01:45 AM
If using a drum sander in this way, I'd be interested to know what grit sandpaper would be used to ensure a good tight fit into the channel.

Michael N.
04-08-2016, 01:52 AM
You can do a similar thing with a hand plane, where the plane runs on 'tracks' and stops planing as soon as it reaches the stop. Some makers thickness the binding so it's a hair width thinner than the sides. That ensures you get a very even width to the binding, although it doesn't hurt my eyes if the binding varies a touch. Large variations can certainly look a little odd.
You can also save yourself the effort of doing the binding ledge if you glue the linings proud of the side. It automatically forms the rebate. It's not totally problem free though.

Michael N.
04-08-2016, 01:59 AM
If using a drum sander in this way, I'd be interested to know what grit sandpaper would be used to ensure a good tight fit into the channel.


I think that's all about cutting a good channel and the method of actually binding, spoiling the inner edge etc. I doubt grit size has much to do with things. If I form the rebate as I indicated in the previous post I get zero gaps. If I use a purfling cutter I might get a couple of hairline gaps at some points on the binding. Mostly they vanish with the pore filling or the finish.

saltytri
04-08-2016, 05:16 AM
And me as well..I sometimes put some tape around them at the ends to hold them together

Obviously, some people do better than me at planning ahead! I usually do only a set at a time, just for the project at hand.

saltytri
04-08-2016, 05:20 AM
If using a drum sander in this way, I'd be interested to know what grit sandpaper would be used to ensure a good tight fit into the channel.


My sander has two drums that can be adjusted for height in tandem or independently. One has 80 and the other 120. To do bindings and anything else that doesn't require a lot of material removal, I lower the 120 drum and use it solo.