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Kayak Jim
04-28-2016, 06:22 AM
A woman in one of my groups with an inexpensive uke wants to add a strap button but the uke has no inside end block. I told her a luthier could probably insert an end block through the sound hole to reinforce the thin sides to accept the button screw.

If I were doing it myself I'd consider adding a small (fancy) reinforcement on the out side. It's an inexpensive uke as I mentioned.

Any other ideas?

spookelele
04-28-2016, 06:33 AM
Maybe the solution is to not drill.

http://ukenut.com/ukulele-straps-no-drilling/ <-- This guy apparently has done the research.

kissing
04-28-2016, 06:44 AM
I'm going to be honest and say that a traditional strap with endpins is the most comfortable and convenient once installed.
I've tried no-drill options... and well... they all compromise on comfort and convenience compared to a regular strap held by pins

spookelele
04-28-2016, 07:01 AM
Kissing, I agree.

But adding a block, to an inexpensive uke to add a button, might not be a viable option. If the bottom is flat, it would be easier. but it's probably got a radius that would need to be matched and clamped from the inside

So... they might be better off using something that doesn't require drilling.

Tim Mullins
04-28-2016, 07:32 AM
A Mobius Strap would do the job, with no drilling.

johnson430
04-28-2016, 07:41 AM
It is a cheap uke, is it a soprano size?
If so, I would just add a small anchor to the screw after I put the button on the screw. Like this:
http://www.amazon.com/Hillman-Group-370332-Plastic-12-14-16/dp/B000BOAT6U/ref=pd_sim_60_1?ie=UTF8&dpID=31YzOosnvUL&dpSrc=sims&preST=_AC_UL160_SR160%2C160_&refRID=0FMKSQMZJQDXEVAHZWSX

You might have to drill the hole to fit the anchor but this is the easiest fix for a real strap on a cheap uke.
And on that note, get a real strap. I tried a few of the "other kind" that go around the shoulder or through the soundhole.
Not a fan at all. Thicker is better when it comes to straps. Period.
I even have a strap on my pineapple, it makes playing so much easier.

spookelele
04-28-2016, 09:09 AM
If there's no block, I don't think the anchor does anything.
The problem with no block, is that there's only a thin piece of wood to screw into, which is why adding a block would be a good solution.. if you could add it. But adding a block on a curved surface that you can't trace and get the curve right might be tricky, cuz if you have the wrong curve and clamp it.. I think you could split the seam.. unless there's no seam in the butt?

johnson430
04-28-2016, 09:12 AM
If there's no block, I don't think the anchor does anything.
The problem with no block, is that there's only a thin piece of wood to screw into, which is why adding a block would be a good solution.. if you could add it. But adding a block on a curved surface that you can't trace and get the curve right might be tricky, cuz if you have the wrong curve and clamp it.. I think you could split the seam.. unless there's no seam in the butt?

The anchor will secure the screw to the wood when there is no support(block).
That is the purpose of an anchor.

mm stan
04-28-2016, 10:43 AM
How about a velcro stick on since its a cheap uke

spookelele
04-28-2016, 11:22 AM
The anchor will secure the screw to the wood when there is no support(block).
That is the purpose of an anchor.

What does it secure the screw to?

The wall anchors usually work by expansion. The expansion increases the pressure between the screw and the hole. I don't think it will make the wood any stronger, but I can see how it might split/crack the wood or open the seam if there is a seam in the butt. In dry wall the ribbing in the plastic helps it grab the plaster, but that's not applicable here.

Have you tried this, or are you thinking this works in a theoretical sense?

johnson430
04-28-2016, 11:45 AM
What does it secure the screw to?

The wall anchors usually work by expansion. The expansion increases the pressure between the screw and the hole. I don't think it will make the wood any stronger, but I can see how it might split/crack the wood or open the seam if there is a seam in the butt. In dry wall the ribbing in the plastic helps it grab the plaster, but that's not applicable here.

Have you tried this, or are you thinking this works in a theoretical sense?

I was only showing the plastic to explain what I was talking about.
I was not clear. That is fault
What I was thinking about is called a hollow wall anchor. Please look at this video @ 1:20 to see what I am talking about.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c3by-3a8RFc
Again, sorry for the confusion.

Also called Mollybolts, Here is a link:
http://www.amazon.com/Storehouse-67550-Molly-Assortment-Piece/dp/B006ZB8Z0K/ref=sr_1_1?s=industrial&ie=UTF8&qid=1461876517&sr=1-1&keywords=molly+bolt

spookelele
04-28-2016, 02:34 PM
I've thought about this a little more.

If you want to put a button on the tail, the problem is that that's usually a single screw taking the load, and without a tail block, that might fail.

But.. what if you use an electric end pin jack?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Popular-New-Guitar-End-Pin-Stereo-Jack-Socket-With-Screws-Gold-Chrome-Plated-1pc-/301453105014

90695

I'm not normally a fan of this type of jack. But for this purpose it has quite a bit of advantage. In a situation without an end pin block, this type distributes the strain across 3 small screws and the pin. Also, there's the opportunity to CA glue it for additional strength, because the flange has significant area. I guess if you wanted to spring a couple more bucks, you could get a undersaddle piezo, or not.

Kayak Jim
04-28-2016, 03:01 PM
Thanks for all the suggestions. I'll pass them along. Her uke isn't a soprano but concert IIRC. An end pin jack of the type that uses a backer nut would probably work too since it spreads the load around a bit, as does the anchor. I use leash type straps myself.

M3Ukulele
04-28-2016, 04:41 PM
I use sound hole straps for tenor ukulele and think they are the best. Simple and easy to use. Used end pin straps for years with guitar but just love soundhole straps for ukulele.

kissing
04-28-2016, 05:43 PM
Are you sure it doesnt have an endblock? I cant imagine a concert uke not having the capability to install an endpin

Kayak Jim
04-28-2016, 07:02 PM
I could see through the sound hole that there was no end block.

Phluffy the Destroyer
04-28-2016, 07:21 PM
Hardware stores are wonderful places. They usually have rows and rows of little screws and washers and widgets.

I'd replace the wood screw with a machine screw. Instead of using a wooden block on the inside I'd use a piece of sheet rubber or maybe 2-3 rubber washers. Run the screw through the uke, through the rubber, cap that with a steel washer, a lock washer and a nut. You're looking at about $4 and 10 minutes of your time at the hardware store.

kohanmike
04-28-2016, 09:45 PM
Hardware stores are wonderful places. They usually have rows and rows of little screws and washers and widgets. I'd replace the wood screw with a machine screw. Instead of using a wooden block on the inside I'd use a piece of sheet rubber or maybe 2-3 rubber washers. Run the screw through the uke, through the rubber, cap that with a steel washer, a lock washer and a nut. You're looking at about $4 and 10 minutes of your time at the hardware store.

Plus 1 on this idea, makes sense to me.

Ukejenny
04-29-2016, 04:25 AM
This was my experience, as well. I started with the leash, and that felt so good I decided to try a strap. Immediate improvement in my playing and technique. I would let a luthier do it and get a button installed.


I'm going to be honest and say that a traditional strap with endpins is the most comfortable and convenient once installed.
I've tried no-drill options... and well... they all compromise on comfort and convenience compared to a regular strap held by pins

spookelele
04-29-2016, 05:44 AM
Since it doesn't have a tail block.. I'm guessing Jim is spot on with it being a very inexpensive uke.
If the owner takes it to a luthier... most likely getting it done will cost more than the uke.
At what point/cost do you then... just get a uke with a tail block?

kohanmike
04-29-2016, 07:20 AM
Since it doesn't have a tail block.. I'm guessing Jim is spot on with it being a very inexpensive uke.
If the owner takes it to a luthier... most likely getting it done will cost more than the uke.
At what point/cost do you then... just get a uke with a tail block?

Good point.

Lori
04-29-2016, 09:53 AM
You can try the Uke Leash, and if it doesn't work for you, you can return it for a refund (minus original shipping cost).
–Lori

coolkayaker1
04-29-2016, 02:44 PM
:cool:

Would installing an inexpensive pickup accomplish the tasks of reinforcing the end-plate with a nut and adding a strap attachment? Sure, there'd be some tension when knocking about with the strap on, but I'd wager it would hold.

UUer John showed that it can be installed in the thin wall, at least:
http://youtu.be/FB2oi0tXX_E

The cheapest unit on Amazon now is under eight bucks.
1set 1/4" Stereo End Pin Jack Connection with Ukulele Piezo Pickup Under-saddle Passive https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DH6YW4E/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_awd_Pr.ixbX78R31M

pritch
04-29-2016, 05:34 PM
How about a velcro stick on since its a cheap uke

I'm with Stan. I use velcro on two of my concerts, neither of which is *that* cheap. If you stick the loop part of the velcro to the uke it won't keep grabbing your clothes.