PDA

View Full Version : Real ukulele teachers???



charlotteh
05-03-2016, 03:22 AM
I live in Atlanta, and it's a reasonably big area. There are lots of music resources here, but not so much for ukulele. Maybe there is and I just can't find it, but if that's the case then the reason I can't find it is that virtually everybody who teaches guitar claims that they teach ukulele. I sign up for lessons and the teacher is fabulous at guitar but he doesn't actually play ukulele. I even gave him one and after 5 months I can't tell that he has thought about the ukulele until its time for my lesson and then he just tries to focus his attention briefly on only 2/3 of his fretboard. Most of my progress has been self inflicted. My teacher is fabulous at being able to listen to a song and then identify the chord progression. Is this the best there is? Is this life for most everywhere? I'm trying to stop short of doing a rant here, but this to me is like someone saying that they teach violin because they play the cello. Anyone else find this situation in common?

whistleman123
05-03-2016, 05:36 AM
I've had the exact same experience here in Cleveland! Here is what I've ended up doing. For general "uke" playing, like you, I'm learning on my own. Then I identified some specific goals I couldn't teach my self and found a teacher for them.

First, I wanted to learn how to comp jazz chords and do fills. So I went back to the guitar teacher and established that as a goal, and I seem to be making progress on that front.

Second, I switched a soprano to violin tuning and found an Irish Fiddle Teacher and now I'm learning Irish Fiddle tunes with proper ornamentation. The guy I'm leaning from is as excited about it as I am!

70sSanO
05-03-2016, 05:57 AM
Actually you have a pretty poor teacher, guitar or otherwise. Unfortunately there are a lot of guitar teachers who merely transpose/tab songs because that is what their students want. Kids show up and want to learn this or that song and there is no theory. I hate to say it, but any guitar teacher who hasn't mastered the ukulele fretboard in 5 minutes is worthless.

Any competent guitar teacher can teach you chords, fingering, scales, etc. I will stop short of including strumming because I think ukulele strumming techniques would require some real expertise in that area. If nothing else, change teachers.

John

Rllink
05-03-2016, 05:59 AM
Yes, that has been the case for me as well. I've not taken any lessons, but I have talked to four or five guitar instructors who have jumped on the ukulele band wagon. In every case, it seems that they view the ukulele as a step to guitar. One in fact told me right out that I didn't really need to learn to play the ukulele first, that I could just start on guitar if I wanted. But in my search for a ukulele instructor, I got offered a job teaching ukulele. I found that interesting because I do not consider myself competent enough on the ukulele to teach others, and I'm not a real good teacher regardless. I know myself. I did express my misgivings, and they did not seem to be too concerned. Business is business you know. So that is something to be aware of as well. I mean, they were willing to hire me without a whole lot of credentials to back it up. I am not looking for a job, but someone else like me might be tempted. Beware, you don't want me being your ukulele instructor.

sukie
05-03-2016, 06:14 AM
I take Skype lessons. With a real ukulele player/teacher. I started out 8 years ago with a local teacher. But she was a guitar player teacher. Then I switched to a different teacher -- same problem.

You might want to think about skype lessons. I think UU keeps a list.

jonyoon
05-03-2016, 07:16 AM
Although I was classically trained in singing (my teacher wanted all his students to be performers at the Lyric Opera in Chicago) and I was also taught to play piano for a few years (stereotypical Asian family), my guitar and ukulele education was self-taught for years (along with several other instruments) and I mostly teach just ukulele since it's my preferred instrument. Yes, a lot of the guitar skill can transfer over, which is why a lot of guitar teachers are now teaching ukulele, but they also have different motivations in their teaching.

I checked the James Hill teachers directory to see if there were any instructors that were certified in your area, but it doesn't appear to be the case (http://www.theukuleleway.com/teacher-directory), but I'd say to go with Sukie's advice and find an instructor that can teach via Skype. Another possible idea is to go to your local ukulele group/circle and attend their ukulele jams. You might be able to find someone there that teaches ukulele exclusively or at least has a bigger passion for teaching it (and not look at the ukulele as another step to guitar playing).

Uncle Rod Higuchi
05-03-2016, 07:25 AM
For those who may want some assistance with teaching themselves, please feel free
to click on the Ukulele Boot Camp link in my signature below.

some have found the information helpful :)

keep uke'in',

jddennis
05-03-2016, 07:27 AM
I've never been to a ukulele teacher, per se, but I've worked with several guitar and keyboard professors over the years. When I picked up ukulele, it was an attempt to overcome a musical stagnation. I wasn't making any progress, and thought the change-up in instruments would help. I assumed, like many guitarists, that the ukulele is a smaller guitar with less strings. Over the years, I learned that it's definitely not true, but it was helpful at the time. And some of the techniques (not all, but enough) transfer without too much of a problem.

All that to say: a teacher should work with you specifically on what you want to learn. For example, if you want to specialize in a particular style of music, that should be your starting point. Or if you want to learn how to read music, that's another good starting point. If you want to learn the ukulele for the joy of ukulele, they shouldn't just assume you're using it as a shortcut to guitar. Also, their playing ability on your desired instrument should be greater than your own.

I know that there is a ukulele teacher certification program. They actually have a teacher directory (http://www.jhui.org/certification/teacher-directory.htm). It may be helpful in finding someone who's qualified to teach you the ukulele locally.

kohanmike
05-03-2016, 12:28 PM
I played guitar for almost 50 years when I took up the uke over 3 years ago. I haven't touched my guitars since and relegated them to the closet. I would think online lessons are be the way to go. The leader of our uke group/classes does Skype lessons. CaliRose.com

farmerjones
05-03-2016, 06:25 PM
The Uke Republic is based in Austell, which isn't too far away from you. Making try asking for some resources there?

http://www.ukerepublic.com/visit-uke-republic.html

Mattyukaholic
05-03-2016, 10:18 PM
I see this problem a lot over here in the UK. Many pupils come to me after having had lessons from other teachers whom happen to mostly focus on guitar and think 'Advanced ukulele' constitutes being able to play C, F and G and little else. I'm sure there are some great teachers that do both guitar and ukulele but more often than not the ukulele part is a side project and they have very little proficiency. I won't get into specifics because it's very contentious but the students that I know came from guitar teachers picked up many bad habits right from the start i.e. playing the ukulele like a guitar.

YorkSteve
05-03-2016, 11:45 PM
It's an interesting subject. You only have to go to any ukulele event, or look at videos on here, and you will see loads of different ways of playing the ukulele. Any teacher can only teach you what they know themselves, and if you go to enough lessons they will probably teach you to play the way they play.
A few people have asked me "how do you strum like that?" and "what are those little notes you keep adding?" - I show them quickly and off they go to try it. I don't claim to be a teacher, but maybe I should? Other people I know have paid for lessons and come away drowning in theory, trying to fingerpick something by Mozart. Which is fine if you want to play Mozart, but not if you just want to strum without having DDUDUDD written in front of you.
I think with any teacher, you need to ask them what they will teach you, and tell them what you want to be able to do. If the two don't match, go to somebody else.

Mattyukaholic
05-04-2016, 12:01 AM
The other thing worth looking at is the experience and teaching skills of said teacher. How many students have they taught? What is their style? Like any profession, teaching isn't just being able to do something and showing somebody else. A good teacher is personable, a good listener, adaptable, patient, able to react to student's needs etc etc. These skills are often overlooked. A good player does not necessarily make a good teacher. I sometimes get offended (because I'm over sensitive) when these things are overlooked. Being able to look up symptoms on google doesn't make you a doctor. Being able to play well doesn't make you a teacher.
Caveat: I'm making these statements to help people looking for teachers. I'm not saying 'I' have all these perfect skills. I'm still learning after years.

hendulele
05-04-2016, 12:50 AM
I second the idea of talking to the folks at Uke Republic. Also consider attending a local uke jam (there must be several in a city the size of Atlanta) and see if anyone there knows uke teachers or is one. Uncle Rod is a good resource, and the people on the main UU site offer a wealth of videos for a very reasonable fee, and provide Skype sessions.

Many folks learn more with the teacher there in the room, of course (so long as the teacher is competent). So YMMV.

kohanmike
05-04-2016, 06:26 AM
...A good player does not necessarily make a good teacher... Being able to play well doesn't make you a teacher...

This struck a chord in me; at a uke festival I attended a couple of years ago I took two workshops, both lead by very well known uke players (no names). The first I immediately realized did not know how to present to the group, went too fast, didn't engage the group, acted more like it was a performance than a workshop, basically showing off. The second was exceptional, it was very obvious that person took the time to prepare a presentation that would benefit the group, not them self. I made a point later in front of a food truck to compliment the second presenter, who was very grateful for the feedback.

I used to teach computers to individuals and I made it a point to know their skill level and approach them that way. I've seen too many times where a teacher only works from their own needs, rather than the student's needs.

weerpool
05-04-2016, 09:18 AM
i play the uke to get better at guitar.

rappsy
05-04-2016, 09:35 AM
The other thing worth looking at is the experience and teaching skills of said teacher. How many students have they taught? What is their style? Like any profession, teaching isn't just being able to do something and showing somebody else. A good teacher is personable, a good listener, adaptable, patient, able to react to student's needs etc etc. These skills are often overlooked. A good player does not necessarily make a good teacher. I sometimes get offended (because I'm over sensitive) when these things are overlooked. Being able to look up symptoms on google doesn't make you a doctor. Being able to play well doesn't make you a teacher.
Caveat: I'm making these statements to help people looking for teachers. I'm not saying 'I' have all these perfect skills. I'm still learning after years.

Matt is being modest. I can heartily recommend him. He has opened up my playing quite a bit. He is in England and I take weekly Skype lessons from him. I am extremely happy with him and plan on using him for a long time to come. If you have questions, PM me and I will be glad to tell you about this man and how he has improved my playing. I am one of the few people that did not come from a guitar background. I played guitar for a few months when I was a teen and nothing since, so I have learned what I learned on the Uke and have not had to convert my learning from the guitar.

Wicked
05-04-2016, 09:57 AM
A good guitar teacher should be able to teach ukulele. Unfortunately, most guitar teachers aren't very good at teaching guitar either.

ScooterD35
05-04-2016, 03:48 PM
In all honesty, there are online courses that are much better than a lot of local "teachers" and less expensive as well.

The two that immediately come to mind are the lessons available right here on the UU...


http://ukuleleunderground.com


...and of course, James Hill's Ukulele Way community.


http://www.theukuleleway.com


You can take advantage of both of these for less than what you would pay a local teacher, the lessons are available 24/7 so you can learn at your own pace and on your schedule, and you are literally learning from two of the best Ukulele players on the planet. Musicians for whom the Ukulele is their primary instrument, and not an afterthought.


Scooter

charlotteh
05-04-2016, 11:53 PM
Thank you all for your responses. Obviously there is a business thing going on where music stores just want to exploit the ukulele wave. I didn't mention in my initial post that my ukulele is a baritone tuned dgbe, but still it says something that my teacher is using his guitar in my lessons. For the last two months I have felt adrift at sea with my practice.

Soundbored
05-05-2016, 12:55 AM
...I didn't mention in my initial post that my ukulele is a baritone tuned dgbe, but still it says something that my teacher is using his guitar in my lessons.

That was a bit of a key fact that you left out. Your teacher's guitar exactly covers the tuning intervals and range of your uke.

Much different than you walking in with a gcea soprano uke.

ProfChris
05-05-2016, 06:57 AM
I don't teach uke, but I have years of teaching university stuff and the basic requirements are the same:

1. You need to be told how to do things (in my work, what you need to understand intellectually) in a coherent and logical order. You can get this from books, or online or in person.

2. You need the individual analysis and feedback about what you could improve, and how and why. You can only get this from personal interaction (whether online or in person). Often simple stuff, like "If you put your thumb there instead you'll be able to make that chord", or "If you want to move between these two chords it's easier if you finger the first chord this way".

If you're not getting the second from your teacher then I think you're missing out.

charlotteh
05-05-2016, 07:37 AM
OK, let me be a little more specific. I walk into a lesson and show my teacher that I've been working on a tune Maria Elena. My idea was that I could use garage band and record the chord progression and then play the melody over it. I had used a guitar book and familiarized myself with note reading well enough to be able to tab it out because I could only find the tune in notation. So, I say I want to work on Maria Elena. I wound up clapping the beats for the entire hour and never worked on the tune. I have been listening to this song since the 1960's when Los Indios Tabajares did it. Over 5 months and nothing with the right hand has been covered. No accents of any kind with the left hand like vibrato, hammer on-pulloff, bends, nothing. Lots of theory on paper that pretty much I haven't a clue what to use it for yet. I go in for a lesson and say that I have a song I want to learn to finger pick, and that was 3 months ago and when I have a song I would like to do in a finger style, he tells me the song is perfect strummed. It may be, but my stated goal is to do more than just strum and that I'd like to be able to play some lead or solo over myself and I've learned scales and improvised over backing tracks on youtube, but after a while I'm wondering where this is going. It isn't like he has shown me things that I have been unable to do. Anyway, I'm auditioning another teacher this month and so far with 2 lessons with him I think this guy may be marginally better. I'm very likely dropping teacher numero uno at the end of this month and giving the new guy a couple of months to show me something. The complaint is really that with a real ukulele teacher this who process would be further along than it is.

cml
05-05-2016, 07:58 AM
OK, let me be a little more specific. I walk into a lesson and show my teacher that I've been working on a tune Maria Elena. My idea was that I could use garage band and record the chord progression and then play the melody over it. I had used a guitar book and familiarized myself with note reading well enough to be able to tab it out because I could only find the tune in notation. So, I say I want to work on Maria Elena. I wound up clapping the beats for the entire hour and never worked on the tune. I have been listening to this song since the 1960's when Los Indios Tabajares did it. Over 5 months and nothing with the right hand has been covered. No accents of any kind with the left hand like vibrato, hammer on-pulloff, bends, nothing. Lots of theory on paper that pretty much I haven't a clue what to use it for yet. I go in for a lesson and say that I have a song I want to learn to finger pick, and that was 3 months ago and when I have a song I would like to do in a finger style, he tells me the song is perfect strummed. It may be, but my stated goal is to do more than just strum and that I'd like to be able to play some lead or solo over myself and I've learned scales and improvised over backing tracks on youtube, but after a while I'm wondering where this is going. It isn't like he has shown me things that I have been unable to do. Anyway, I'm auditioning another teacher this month and so far with 2 lessons with him I think this guy may be marginally better. I'm very likely dropping teacher numero uno at the end of this month and giving the new guy a couple of months to show me something. The complaint is really that with a real ukulele teacher this who process would be further along than it is.
Why dont you try an online course instead?

Uke Republic
05-05-2016, 08:10 AM
I live in Atlanta, and it's a reasonably big area. There are lots of music resources here, but not so much for ukulele. Maybe there is and I just can't find it, but if that's the case then the reason I can't find it is that virtually everybody who teaches guitar claims that they teach ukulele. I sign up for lessons and the teacher is fabulous at guitar but he doesn't actually play ukulele. I even gave him one and after 5 months I can't tell that he has thought about the ukulele until its time for my lesson and then he just tries to focus his attention briefly on only 2/3 of his fretboard. Most of my progress has been self inflicted. My teacher is fabulous at being able to listen to a song and then identify the chord progression. Is this the best there is? Is this life for most everywhere? I'm trying to stop short of doing a rant here, but this to me is like someone saying that they teach violin because they play the cello. Anyone else find this situation in common?

Hi, Mike from Uke Republic here. Depending on what part of the city you are in. I can recommend Stu @ Stuzonder.com for Marietta area, Sandy Springs Arnold - arnoldzilberkant@yahoo.com and Bill who is on this forum as 23skidoo in Gwinett . We have workshops here at the shop and list them on our site and in news letter. Also check out the South East Ukers on meetup and Facebook for goings on that are uke related.

johnson430
05-05-2016, 08:56 AM
Why dont you try an online course instead?

I agree. After buying several books/books w/cd's, books w/DVDs. I finally gave James Hill's The Ukulele Way online course a try.
Well, the free lessons had me hooked.
I signed up on Sunday for the paid course and I am almost through the first book. I am already starting to read music notation more easily and the songs are great.

And I read that the OP wants to learn to play songs with strumming and picking. His technique teaches you to play both at the same time so it sounds like there are two ukes. No need to have to try to sync two recordings if you can strum and pick at the same time.
If you are in the USA his online course comes out to 7.50 a month.
Worth a try for the free lessons to see if you like the way the course is laid out. My favorite part is all the tips and tricks he shares.

70sSanO
05-05-2016, 11:04 AM
Hi, Mike from Uke Republic here. Depending on what part of the city you are in. I can recommend Stu @ Stuzonder.com for Marietta area, Sandy Springs Arnold - arnoldzilberkant@yahoo.com and Bill who is on this forum as 23skidoo in Gwinett . We have workshops here at the shop and list them on our site and in news letter. Also check out the South East Ukers on meetup and Facebook for goings on that are uke related.

^ Mike to the rescue!

John

thejumpingflea
05-05-2016, 11:35 AM
I've been teaching the ukulele online through Skype, full time, for the last 4 years now. It's amazing how well the technology works, and allows people to have access to a teacher no matter where they are in the world.

Ukejenny
05-06-2016, 07:25 AM
My background is music education, so I feel pretty good about helping a beginner, but I would not want to give lessons to an advanced player. I had three children take ukulele lessons from me, all three coming from a "music academy" one town over. Their ukulele "teacher" was a piano teacher who played piano while they played ukulele. They did this for a year. Their books contained lessons that were scratched out with pen because she didn't know how to teach them that skill. We had to start over. They didn't know how to hold the instrument, how to tune it, now to take care of it. I was mortified to be told how much they paid for these lessons. They couldn't strum. It was a mess.

I haven't had any luck finding a teacher for myself. If you find someone in the Atlanta area, please post it here. I would be willing to drive to someone who could really help me with some advanced playing techniques.

uku0729
05-06-2016, 08:04 AM
I'm in SF and there are very few ukulele teachers here that give private lessons and are not really guitar teachers slumming it. If you can't find a good teacher locally, I would give an online teacher a try. The problem with online lessons without feedback is just that - you need feedback to find out where you can improve. If you're not doing things in the simplest, easiest way possible, you're working too hard.

sukie
05-06-2016, 08:27 AM
I was very skeptical when I started Skype lessons. How would he notice all the stupid stuff I do? However....he sees it all. I can't put anything past him. He notices the slant of my fingers, he hears differences in my tone. When I was learning pull-offs he could see what I was doing wrong.
The ONLY problem is the lesson itself...I don't have to waste time driving to my lessons, but I have more time to get nervous. I get really nervous.

uku0729
05-06-2016, 08:38 AM
Even the most skilled performer gets nervous playing in front of others. I've been performing for over 50 years and I speak from direct experience. Maybe if you think of your teacher as your coach, perhaps that can help you feel more comfortable in your lessons. All good teachers are basically coaches.

hammer40
05-06-2016, 07:47 PM
I agree. After buying several books/books w/cd's, books w/DVDs. I finally gave James Hill's The Ukulele Way online course a try.
Well, the free lessons had me hooked.
I signed up on Sunday for the paid course and I am almost through the first book. I am already starting to read music notation more easily and the songs are great.

And I read that the OP wants to learn to play songs with strumming and picking. His technique teaches you to play both at the same time so it sounds like there are two ukes. No need to have to try to sync two recordings if you can strum and pick at the same time.
If you are in the USA his online course comes out to 7.50 a month.
Worth a try for the free lessons to see if you like the way the course is laid out. My favorite part is all the tips and tricks he shares.

I just visited the website, and the course is currently $9.00 a month. Just wanted to update that for those interested.

coolkayaker1
05-06-2016, 10:40 PM
I've been teaching the ukulele online through Skype, full time, for the last 4 years now. It's amazing how well the technology works, and allows people to have access to a teacher no matter where they are in the world.

Matt, you are a supremely accomplished player.

The ukulele is rather unique: it's narrow enough in its enthusiasts to permit Skype lessons from some of its best musicians. Lessons with Matt Dahlberg, Brad Bordessa, Brittni Paiva, etc.--where else can one reach for such stars but with the ukulele?

It's like learning the cello from Yo-Yo Ma. It's like honing your country chops with Dolly Parton.

How about noodling on lead guitar one-on-one with Eddie Van Halen, or dialing in your bass guitar funk with Flea from Red Hot Chili Peppers.

Refining your harmonica tongue blocks with blues legend Charlie Musselwhite or Magic Dick from Geils.

It'd be like learning the banjo from...well, whoever in the world is wicked good at banjos.

You get the drift.

PS Lest one think that I've offended the best banjo players, take heart: the banjoists consider the penultimate ukulele musician to be Tiny Tim. When pressed to name the best living ukulele artist, the "Japanese guy in sunglasses on YouTube who plays the Beatles" comes out on top, followed second by some hack in their weekend strum group who shows up with a Makala, a shaker bottle of fruit punch, and a red headstock tuner the size of Rhode Island.

kvehe
05-06-2016, 10:57 PM
I just visited the website, and the course is currently $9.00 a month. Just wanted to update that for those interested.

That is in Canadian dollars. The charge varies slightly from month to month with the exchange rate. My charge last week was US $7.27, and well worth it.

Nickie
05-07-2016, 12:22 AM
Really good thread, this. Think I'll try James Hill's course when my Music Theory classes are done. They're free so I'm going to finish them. I've learned a lot, and my teacher makes great Turkish coffee.....plus, she's very effective.

peanuts56
05-07-2016, 01:54 AM
Uncle Rod posted a bit about his site. His site is excellent. I teach music in a public school system in Conn. I was asked to do a workshop for our dept. and used his materials. After an hour people who had never played before were strumming and singing Blowing In The Wind and having a blast. Thanks Uncle Rod.

hammer40
05-07-2016, 02:18 AM
That is in Canadian dollars. The charge varies slightly from month to month with the exchange rate. My charge last week was US $7.27, and well worth it.

I stand corrected. I didn't even think about that being in Canadian money.

kvehe
05-07-2016, 06:20 AM
I stand corrected. I didn't even think about that being in Canadian money.

Well, I don't think it says that specifically. Even at US$9.00 it would be valuable.

johnson430
05-07-2016, 06:24 AM
I stand corrected. I didn't even think about that being in Canadian money.

Hammer40

I have tried many methods over the last year and half of playing the uke. I have never learned so much in so short a time as I did with The Ukulele Way.

I still work out of my Pekelo book as a nice supplement to the Uke Way course.

Rank_beginner
05-07-2016, 06:30 AM
Has anyone tried the Craig Chee and Sarah Maisel lessons on ArtistWorks.com? It looks like an interesting format--the student learns the lessons, then records a video of his or her performance, and then Craig and Sarah in theory send feedback.Looks like there's a lot of content there. http://artistworks.com/ukulele-lessons-craig-sarah

hammer40
05-07-2016, 06:46 AM
Hammer40

I have tried many methods over the last year and half of playing the uke. I have never learned so much in so short a time as I did with The Ukulele Way.

I still work out of my Pekelo book as a nice supplement to the Uke Way course.

Before this thread, I did not know his course existed. I am now thinking of giving it a try. I have been a little stagnant in my practice and looking for something to reinvigorate me.

kvehe
05-07-2016, 07:54 AM
Has anyone tried the Craig Chee and Sarah Maisel lessons on ArtistWorks.com? It looks like an interesting format--the student learns the lessons, then records a video of his or her performance, and then Craig and Sarah in theory send feedback.Looks like there's a lot of content there. http://artistworks.com/ukulele-lessons-craig-sarah

Hammer40 learned about The Ukulele Way, and I learned about this. Thank you! I went through a period during which I stalked ArtistWorks looking for a ukulele course, but hadn't looked lately.

johnson430
05-07-2016, 08:26 AM
Before this thread, I did not know his course existed. I am now thinking of giving it a try. I have been a little stagnant in my practice and looking for something to reinvigorate me.

Like you, I was feeling stagnant. I like the Pekelo but there are a lot of exercises between learning songs. And that was the same with my Alfred Method. I was only learning little things without direction.

With The Uke Way, I learned four new songs in one week. They are all songs that worked off the C pentatonic scale. And 3 of them are songs I will add to my repertoire. There is a nice mix of styles too.
The navigation part is so cool. Check it out: He made pre-designed lessons for things like learning just classical, just music notation, just folk and traditional songs. And you can move around and learn at your own pace or navigate to a new learning path.
I am teacher, going on 10 years now. From a teacher's stand-point, this is a great way to improve your playing, regardless of your level. (he does have a beginner level)
An advanced player told me about the course, which put me off at first, because I thought it was for more advanced players, but it is for all.

For me, an intermediate player who was looking for something new, it has accomplished the task.
Go for it. His is the best way (IMHO) to learn music notation. (I have tried several ways)
He starts out at the best place for uke player. The C pentatonic scale. You learn 4 songs on that scale.
Finally, my confidence in reading notation has grown considerably.
And my playing has more control as well. His tips and tricks in the videos are worth the $9CAD a month all by themselves.

Recstar24
05-07-2016, 08:59 AM
I've been using James books on and off for the past few months. I really should invest more time into them, as well as the paid videos. He is a fantastic teacher!

Just last night, I was working on book 3, Au Claire De Lune. Not necessarily my preferred song choices but I admit it makes you better and I'm mentally engaged. Need to continue more into book 4 and also pick up 5 and 6.

ukulelekarcsi
05-07-2016, 09:08 AM
It'd be like learning the banjo from...well, whoever in the world is wicked good at banjos.


Bela Fleck's his name. He has a Jake Shimabukuro connection as well. But I did get the joke!

coolkayaker1
05-07-2016, 12:29 PM
Bela Fleck's his name. He has a Jake Shimabukuro connection as well. But I did get the joke!

Hello, friend. Thanks for the info. 👍🏻

johnson430
05-07-2016, 03:14 PM
I've been using James books on and off for the past few months. I really should invest more time into them, as well as the paid videos. He is a fantastic teacher!

Just last night, I was working on book 3, Au Claire De Lune. Not necessarily my preferred song choices but I admit it makes you better and I'm mentally engaged. Need to continue more into book 4 and also pick up 5 and 6.

Ryan.
I would like to get your impression of the videos vs. the books. It states on the website that you are getting the same thing as the books.
You can do a free trial, it only gives you a few lessons but it would allow you an opportunity to compare the two without having to make an investment.
Although seven bucks for one month is not much to sample the full Ukulele Way course.

Recstar24
05-07-2016, 03:47 PM
From what I've seen from his free sample videos and those offered in his YouTube page, he definitely goes into much greater depth and technique through the videos. I find his video communication style and presentation flawless as an educator, whereas the books/writings are very minimal and are more the general outline of content. If you are a visual learner, you could probably learn everything just by the videos, whereas the books only would not be enough in my opinion.

I really need to pay my $7 already :)


Ryan.
I would like to get your impression of the videos vs. the books. It states on the website that you are getting the same thing as the books.
You can do a free trial, it only gives you a few lessons but it would allow you an opportunity to compare the two without having to make an investment.
Although seven bucks for one month is not much to sample the full Ukulele Way course.

photoshooter
05-07-2016, 03:59 PM
Has anyone tried the Craig Chee and Sarah Maisel lessons on ArtistWorks.com? It looks like an interesting format--the student learns the lessons, then records a video of his or her performance, and then Craig and Sarah in theory send feedback.Looks like there's a lot of content there. http://artistworks.com/ukulele-lessons-craig-sarah


Sarah has always been a favorite musician for me. I was lucky enough to do some workshops with her and Craig at UkeNJ and they both have a great teaching style. I signed up for ArtistWorks before it went live. I'm very pleased with the format and content.

Joyful Uke
05-07-2016, 04:22 PM
I couldn't tell from the website: Can you just pay for one month?

johnson430
05-07-2016, 04:34 PM
I couldn't tell from the website: Can you just pay for one month?

Yes, you can cancel after one month.
Did you try the free parts first? That is what sold me. It has been less than a week and I feel like the site is worth the money I spent.
I know of one advanced player who went through the entire course in a month. It might take me a few more.
Luckily, my summer break is coming up in a few weeks and I will have 3 months off to work on uke, et al.

Joyful Uke
05-07-2016, 05:27 PM
I've started the free parts, but haven't had a chance to finish them yet. I do plan on doing that first, and then deciding if I want to do the paid portions, but so far, it's looking good. Thanks for the response.

jonyoon
05-07-2016, 08:00 PM
Reading through this growing thread, I'm starting to get really stoked for the James Hill teaching course I registered for in July!

Joyful Uke
05-08-2016, 06:06 AM
If anyone tries the ArtistWorks lessons, I hope they'll report back on what they think. Looks interesting!

kvehe
05-08-2016, 06:44 AM
I joined as soon as I learned about it. I've been a member of the classical guitar school for a while (Jason Vieaux), but have never really done much with it - I kept getting distracted by the uke. :D I know that one of the complaints about the classical guitar school is that it can take as long as three months to get the feedback video after you submit yours for evaluation. By that time you've either worked it out for yourself, or moved on. I'm guessing that won't be an issue (for a while anyway, if ever) with the ukulele lessons. WRT the uke lessons, all I've done so far is watch the first three videos - Sarah and Craig introducing themselves, their teaching styles/goals, how things are structured; the anatomy of a uke; how to hold a uke; things like that. I won't have much time to devote to it for another week or so. The course is based on conventional high-G tuning, if that makes a difference to anyone.

johnson430
05-08-2016, 06:45 AM
I forgot about the best part of the James Hill The Ukulele Way course.
It is the only course that I have seen that incorporates either High or Low G for each lesson.
On each lesson screen, you can choose linear or re-entrant. So the videos and sheet music will match your tuning.
And I almost forgot, you can pick D6 tuning as well.