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Croaky Keith
05-15-2016, 09:59 PM
I know the regular tuning is the same as the bottom 4 strings of a guitar.

You can also get GCEA strings.

My question is:-

Are the GCEA string sets higher or lower in sound than the regular (baritone) tuning?

Pirate Jim
05-15-2016, 11:37 PM
They're higher - they're the same as your regular baritone with a capo on the 5th fret (i.e. the same as sop/con/ten ukuleles). I've got a baritone strung like this using regular classical guitar strings and it sings!

You can get Guadalupe custom baritone sets that are GCEA but lower than regular baritone tuning - Mainland Mike sells them. They're lovely for fingerpicking but I find them very muddy for strumming.

Croaky Keith
05-16-2016, 12:45 AM
Thanks for your reply Jim. :)

Pirate Jim
05-16-2016, 01:51 AM
I see you're in the UK too - if you want to try a set of the Guadalupe strings PM me. I ordered three sets to make the shipping worth it from the USA so happy to part with one!

Croaky Keith
05-16-2016, 03:18 AM
That is a most generous offer, but I'm only contemplating a possible baritone purchase because I've seen & heard the Kala 'thinline', & it is tempting me. :)

Pirate Jim
05-16-2016, 03:37 AM
I didn't realise they'd done thinline baritones as part of that series. My baritone has a solid spruce top as well - it might be very plain compared to other woods but you really do get a lovely tone out of it.

Croaky Keith
05-16-2016, 04:24 AM
They don't seem to have arrived in this country yet, so I have just emailed S.U.S. to see if they are getting any & if so, at what price.

This is what I found - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJik5ny9w2E

vcs700s
05-16-2016, 04:43 AM
They don't seem to have arrived in this country yet, so I have just emailed S.U.S. to see if they are getting any & if so, at what price.

This is what I found - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJik5ny9w2E

Glad you found my video. I will be stringing the thinline with some J71's this week. I will be tuning it gCEA to see how it sounds. This will be the first time I have tried these strings.

I will post a link in the review section.

Croaky Keith
05-16-2016, 05:15 AM
Glad you found my video. I will be stringing the thinline with some J71's this week. I will be tuning it gCEA to see how it sounds. This will be the first time I have tried these strings.

I will post a link in the review section.

Yes, thanks for posting it, otherwise I might have considered a thick one. :)

(Look forward to see/hear it in gCEA.)

Croaky Keith
05-16-2016, 05:22 AM
Just received this email.


Hi Keith,

We don't currently have a retail price for this Ukulele but are due to receive our first delivery after the Ukulele Festival of Great Britain next month.

Kind Regards
Alex

mds725
05-16-2016, 09:03 AM
I know the regular tuning is the same as the bottom 4 strings of a guitar....

While there's some disagreement about this, the more popular convention seems to be that "top" and "bottom" refer to the pitch of the open strings, not to the location of the strings on the fretboard relative to the ground when you're playing the instrument. So regular baritone tuning (DGBE) is the same as the top four strings of a guitar (i.e., the four strings of the guitar that are highest in pitch), not the bottom four (EADG, which also happens to be conventional bass tuning).

My apologies for the diversion.

Croaky Keith
05-16-2016, 09:18 AM
Top 4 in pitch/tuning, yes, but in relation to the guitar, the bottom 4 strings. :cool:

JackLuis
05-16-2016, 09:55 AM
You should consider re-entrant tuning of the Baritone, dGBE. It makes it sound like a Ukulele not a tenor guitar. chord forms are still confused but it doesn't take too long to adjust.

mds725
05-16-2016, 01:27 PM
Top 4 in pitch/tuning, yes, but in relation to the guitar, the bottom 4 strings. :cool:

I think you missed my original point. It's my understanding that with both ukulele and guitar, the "top" string is the highest-pitched string, so that the top four strings on a guitar. as on a baritone ukulele, would be, from the top string, E, B, G, and D. These are the four bottom strings geographically (i.e, the four strings closest to the ground when you're playing it), but the terms "top" and "bottom" don't refer to geography, they refer to pitch.

vcs700s
05-16-2016, 03:08 PM
Glad you found my video. I will be stringing the thinline with some J71's this week. I will be tuning it gCEA to see how it sounds. This will be the first time I have tried these strings.

I will post a link in the review section.

Here is the link to the YouTube review- https://youtu.be/RO5Sm9ntZP8

sam13
05-16-2016, 03:24 PM
Here is the link to the YouTube review- https://youtu.be/RO5Sm9ntZP8

Nice video, Vic. Thanks.

I just put a set of D'Addario EJ78's with their Low D. Worth CB's for the 1st, 2nd and 3rd ... sounds very much like an Oasis Bright Low G wound set for Tenors.

Croaky Keith
05-16-2016, 11:09 PM
Here is the link to the YouTube review- https://youtu.be/RO5Sm9ntZP8

Thanks for posting - I'm liking the resonance & sustain on that uke. :)

Croaky Keith
05-16-2016, 11:23 PM
I think you missed my original point. It's my understanding ...., but the terms "top" and "bottom" don't refer to geography, they refer to pitch.

Pitch is high or low. :)

(Top & bottom are physical attributes.)

DownUpDave
05-17-2016, 02:21 AM
Pitch is high or low. :)

(Top & bottom are physical attributes.)


One sure fire way to avoid confusion........call them #1, 2, 3, 4 string. Even then people get screwed up until you tell them it is like the floors of a building, bottom floor is number 1

1931jim
05-17-2016, 03:25 AM
You should consider re-entrant tuning of the Baritone, dGBE. It makes it sound like a Ukulele not a tenor guitar. chord forms are still confused but it doesn't take too long to adjust.
A big plus plus from me for the re-entrant dGBE on the baritone. It has an unmistakeable flavour compared to the normal baritone DGBE.

Croaky Keith
05-17-2016, 03:37 AM
I've just tried a down tuned tenor in dGBE to see if I like it, & it isn't for me as I need that low D for the tunes I like/want to play.

However, I think it could be useful to leave the tenor tuned to dGBE for strumming as it has quite a nice tone to it.

Six months into my uke journey now, & I'm still experimenting. :)

JackLuis
05-17-2016, 05:46 AM
I've just tried a down tuned tenor in dGBE to see if I like it, & it isn't for me as I need that low D for the tunes I like/want to play.

However, I think it could be useful to leave the tenor tuned to dGBE for strumming as it has quite a nice tone to it.

Six months into my uke journey now, & I'm still experimenting. :)

Try it with a low D (G) string. Depending upon your Uke it might work fine. I kind of like my dGBE tenors as they have a 'Uke' sound to them. I generally play my concerts as Low G, but am thinking about changing one to hi G just to have both. I'm a little over a year into my uke journy and having fun.

gvelasco
05-17-2016, 08:35 AM
Your choice of tuning should really depend on how you're using your uke. If you're using your bari as part of an ensemble, you should consider "standard" bari uke tuning - DGBE. And, you should consider playing it more like a rhythm guitar than a re-entrant ukulele. Don't worry about it sounding like a tenor guitar instead of a baritone ukulele. Bari uke still has a distinct sound. Tenor guitars use steel strings. Bari ukes use "nylon" strings. Even the wound strings on a bari have a polymer core. Tenor guitars are traditionally tuned in 5th like a four string banjo or a mandolin, so the chord forms are quite different and have different voicings from even a steel string guitar. Tenor guitars usually have a slightly bigger body which combined with steel strings makes them much louder than a bari uke. That makes them to loud to blend well acoustically with ukuleles.

When I play with my ukulele friends I like to play bari uke in "standard" non-reentrant tuning to COMPLIMENT what they are playing. Non-reentrant tuning lets me fill a niche not covered by the other ukes. If someone else is playing bari in standard tuning, then I'll play my acoustic bass (gasp!) or my soprano in D (aDF#B). That way each instrument that we add to the ensemble adds to the overall sound.

If you play bari primarily as a solo instrument all bets are off. Tune it however it sounds good to you. If you sing, tune it in a key that makes the easy chords easy to sing with without having to use a capo. Use re-entrant tuning if you want it to sound more ukulele like and if you'll be using ukulele strumming techniques like claw hammer, split strumming, etc.