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Joyful Uke
05-22-2016, 07:43 AM
The thread on how to sell a MB got me thinking that it might be useful to have a thread on dealing with hand pain, shoulder pain, or other pain that might limit our playing at any time. There were some good suggestions in the MB thread, but possibly buried in there, and maybe there are some other suggestions that people might have?

Has anyone tried Alexander Technique? (I haven't, but it sounds promising.)

Some supplements were mentioned in the MB thread, and might be helpful for some.

I find acupuncture and magnets helpful. I'd be getting massages if it was in the budget, (it's not.)

What other ideas do people have?

Recstar24
05-22-2016, 08:01 AM
My experience with Alexander technique is as a vocalist and choir director. In that domain it truly is excellent in making sure the body is in alignment. I believe similar principles apply to the guitar and fretting world especially with the left hand. Below are just some random thoughts as a music teacher and player myself.

Finding a natural thumb position for fretting is crucial. Thumb position should also be fluid and change depending on what you are doing.

Use the "tip-toes" of your fingers when fretting, I tell my kids to stand tippy toes on the board. The tip of your fingers apply the most direct efficient pressure when fretting, you'll feel it's boney can fleshy, which helps not to over fret.

It's ok to use a strap! This will ensure you don't over grip or mangle your body position just to hold the darn thing. It's taken me a year of playing daily ukulele to truly start feeling comfortable and tense free playing the uke without needing a strap.

Tension is bad! If you feel tension, work to re position yourself out of it.

Pain is bad - rest truly is the best medicine for playing pain at times.

cml
05-22-2016, 08:05 AM
The thread on how to sell a MB got me thinking that it might be useful to have a thread on dealing with hand pain, shoulder pain, or other pain that might limit our playing at any time. There were some good suggestions in the MB thread, but possibly buried in there, and maybe there are some other suggestions that people might have?

Has anyone tried Alexander Technique? (I haven't, but it sounds promising.)

Some supplements were mentioned in the MB thread, and might be helpful for some.

I find acupuncture and magnets helpful. I'd be getting massages if it was in the budget, (it's not.)

What other ideas do people have?
I am actually doing physical therapy for my left thumb, which has been hurting as hell for the past two months in the IP joint. It's gone so far that I cannot even rip a plastic bag of food open or open a normal can. So I went to the doctor, the Xray said nothing broken or no bone changes (so no osteoarthritis thankfully). Now, I go to a physical therapist who help me with rehab excersises. It's slowly been getting better.

Basically, I would suggest that you get a stress ball or make your own balloon with flour, even small excerises everyday will help prevent onset of pain. It's also a good idea if you work with a computer to avoid other injuries.

Lori
05-22-2016, 08:10 AM
Since I am not a doctor, and I like safe non-toxic treatments, I think a warm paraffin bath like Thermabath can feel nice. Some people find it too warm (like my husband), but I can tolerate warmer temps and I find it soothing. When you peel off the soft wax, you can squeeze it in your had for some muscle conditioning. It is especially good in the colder seasons. I usually find it too hot for me in the summer.

–Lori

bunnyf
05-22-2016, 08:24 AM
Episodes of strumming arm pain have got me thinking of preventative measures to try and see that I do not strain my arm again. While I keep busy during layoff, I'd rather be playing. Since the only treatment that really worked for me was time off from playing, I am now focusing on every possible way to make playing more comfortable. In the past, I could play slouched on the couch or hunched over on an uncomfortable stool. Now I am analyzing the best seating position and am gonna treat myself to a really comfortable and supportive armless chair. I think I'm also gonna get a better, more comfortable strap to prevent head drop and tension in my arms. In general, I am going to be more mindful of my body posture, so I can continue playing as long as possible.

janeray1940
05-22-2016, 08:36 AM
So far I've been lucky - the only time I've had hand pain is when I was playing a uke that was too large of a scale for my little hands. I actually had to go to a doctor after spraining something in my left hand trying out a tenor, and my year-long attempt at playing an Ohta-San (scale length is in between concert and tenor) gave me chronic on-and-off left hand pain that has disappeared since I re-homed that uke.

I've actually had more issues with neck/back pain from playing, and the solution for this for me is: (1) ALWAYS use a strap (with a strap button), and (2) alternate sitting and standing. And, of course, (3) don't attempt to play a uke that's too big or too uncomfortable for your particular size and shape!

janeray1940
05-22-2016, 08:40 AM
I like safe non-toxic treatments ... paraffin ...

Hey Lori, I'm not so sure about the safety of paraffin - it's a petroleum derivative and the EPA has set exposure limits (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paraffin_wax), so I wonder if it is absorbed through the skin. To really be on the safe side, maybe you could accomplish the same thing with something like beeswax?

kypfer
05-22-2016, 12:05 PM
One of the other music-related forums I visit has a strict policy regarding the recommendation of medical treatments ... simply put "DON'T DO IT".

If you have a medical problem, see a medical specialist ... you wouldn't take your soprano to your GP 'cos it won't tune properly ... the reverse applies.

Whilst no doubt most advice given would be of a positive nature and given in good faith, if there's an underlying issue or other undiagnosed symptom, unqualified advice could just aggravate the condition.

Just my tuppence-worth, if the Moderators deem this unsuitable I'm sure they'll delete it ;)

Down Up Dick
05-22-2016, 12:41 PM
Episodes of strumming arm pain have got me thinking of preventative measures to try and see that I do not strain my arm again. While I keep busy during layoff, I'd rather be playing. Since the only treatment that really worked for me was time off from playing, I am now focusing on every possible way to make playing more comfortable. In the past, I could play slouched on the couch or hunched over on an uncomfortable stool. Now I am analyzing the best seating position and am gonna treat myself to a really comfortable and supportive armless chair. I think I'm also gonna get a better, more comfortable strap to prevent head drop and tension in my arms. In general, I am going to be more mindful of my body posture, so I can continue playing as long as possible.

If you have occasional, short lay offs, why not try a different instrument to keep making music. Something like harmonicas, tinwhistles or maybe even learn the words to some new songs--heck, music is music. :old:

bunnyf
05-22-2016, 02:12 PM
That is an excellent idea. I would love to cultivate a completely different instrument for when ukeing is not possible. I had considered a small simple concertina.

Lori
05-22-2016, 03:19 PM
Hey Lori, I'm not so sure about the safety of paraffin - it's a petroleum derivative and the EPA has set exposure limits (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paraffin_wax), so I wonder if it is absorbed through the skin. To really be on the safe side, maybe you could accomplish the same thing with something like beeswax?
Thanks janeray1940. I know my doctors have mentioned it, and hadn't heard of any problems. I suppose you could wear gloves, and dip over them.
Bees wax is an interesting idea. Not sure if the melting temperature is different from paraffin. The heated tub is set to a certain temperature, and it doesn't seem to be adjustable (there may be some other versions that have that option). Anybody try bees wax hot dips?

–Lori

Down Up Dick
05-22-2016, 06:27 PM
That is an excellent idea. I would love to cultivate a completely different instrument for when ukeing is not possible. I had considered a small simple concertina.

Yeah, I was interested in a concertina at one time. Anything that interests you will work as a temporary substitute for your Uke.

As I said before: Music is music . . . :old:

Lori
05-22-2016, 07:21 PM
I have considered trying a harp, or a hammered dulcimer as alternative instruments. I love strings!

–Lori

pointpergame
05-22-2016, 08:02 PM
Chording a piano is very easy on the hands. The keyboard is one of the "music theory friendly" instruments and you can grow musically while giving your body a break. I go back and forth to avoid ( somewhat ) repetitive stress.

SallyS
05-23-2016, 03:02 AM
I have arthritis, topped by a left hand that was broken in four places. Pain is the norm, but some days are better than others. Weather is damp generally and that impacts.

These do the trick for me.
http://smile.amazon.com/MediBeads-x2592-Moist-Heat-EasyComforts/dp/B00012QEGG?ie=UTF8&keywords=Heat%20for%20hands&qid=1464004529&ref_=sr_1_6_a_it&sr=8-6

Not a fan of the content or of the microwave, but hot water shrivels the skin and it takes some time for the heat to penetrate.

Squeeze balls sometimes and sometimes a good warm hand massage with coconut oil - but there are times when rest is all that works. Sometimes two minutes will get things situated, sometimes two days is not enough, but if not ready then I play a cd.

My guitar is easier for me than the uke, so I warm up first.

Joyful Uke
05-23-2016, 06:53 AM
These do the trick for me.
http://smile.amazon.com/MediBeads-x2592-Moist-Heat-EasyComforts/dp/B00012QEGG?ie=UTF8&keywords=Heat%20for%20hands&qid=1464004529&ref_=sr_1_6_a_it&sr=8-6

Not a fan of the content or of the microwave, but hot water shrivels the skin and it takes some time for the heat to penetrate.



Thanks for the suggestion. I just bought one to give it a try, and am looking forward to it getting here next week.

The mention of hammer dulcimer stirred up my old desire to play one. A friend had one years ago, and I always wanted one. No room for one at the moment, but something more to daydream about. LOL.

bonesigh
05-23-2016, 11:48 AM
I live in a world of pain but I'm not saying that to complain. Life is good except for that! It's just the way it is. I just deal with it. Some days are better than others. I miss the days when I could take Oxycontin. The doc I had knew I did not abuse it. About a bottle a year. I only needed it when on a long excursion to an amusement park or something. New stinkin' doc say's NO. One knows when I'm feeling super bad as I don't play my uke at all. Which is really unusual for me. I fear the day of no ukeing!

strumsilly
05-23-2016, 02:46 PM
beer and a hot tub

Down Up Dick
05-24-2016, 07:25 AM
beer and a hot tub

Doesn't filling a hot tub require a lotta beer? A doctor would be less expensive. :cheers: :old:

strumsilly
05-24-2016, 07:37 AM
Doesn't filling a hot tub require a lotta beer? A doctor would be less expensive. :cheers: :old:
you must be on subsidized insurance. beer is much cheaper for me. seriously though, pain is no fun, sometimes my arthritis is so bad it hurts to play. i do it anyway, probably not smart. pain is your bodies way of telling you something is wrong.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-24-2016, 07:44 AM
I'm a bit reluctant to take part in this discussion publicly because I've gotten some heat in the past for choosing an alternate, or common sense route, rather than a traditional one. When I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis several years ago it threatened to end my career as an uke builder and change my life as I knew it forever. Every joint of my body was wracked with severe pain. One doctor even advised me to start shopping for wheel chairs because he was doubtful I'd be walking in a year. I took that as a challenge.
Joint pain is caused by inflammation, which happens to be the cause of many of our modern diseases. So do some research on anti inflammatory diets. There's a huge amount of information available. Supplements like omega three oils, turmeric and ginger, glucosamine, vitamin D, are just a few natural daily additions to your diet that can be helpful. I underwent a total dietary change, eliminated the processed foods and refined sugars from my diet. The moment that really turned my life around was when I discovered that eating foods that raised my body's PH eliminated most of my pain within days. Foods that raise the body's PH are raw foods and fermented foods, like kimchee and sauerkraut. We all know the kinds of foods we should eat and those we should avoid. By changing my diet I have pretty much reversed my disease without the use of medications. It's worth trying, it's worked for me. And without medication. (Accupuncture has also worked for me in relieving pain albeit temporarily.)

BTW, the person who opened my eyes on this subject is a medical doctor. He also happens to be an ukulele fanatic and a good customer of mine. Many of you know him or have met him during his travels around the world and the country and he's always happy to play for you at an airport, restaurant, ukulele cruise or wherever you happen to run into him. He's one of the most loving and caring people I have been blessed in my life to know. Although not his specialty, his sharing of his knowledge and wisdom with me about pain and inflammatory diseases gave me my life back. If you are willing to put some effort into it you can manage,reduce or even reverse you pain. I am not suggesting that change. in diet and lifestyle, including stress management, are the only was to address this issue but it works for me.

Good luck and the best of health to all of you. Life's too short to live it in pain. I hope you find a way that works for you.

Down Up Dick
05-24-2016, 08:00 AM
you must be on subsidized insurance. beer is much cheaper for me. seriously though, pain is no fun, sometimes my arthritis is so bad it hurts to play. i do it anyway, probably not smart. pain is your bodies way of telling you something is wrong.

My arthritis is in my hips and in my neck. It's painful sometimes to look at my fretting hand, especially on the banjos.
It's also difficult to look back when I'm driving, and I use a hiking staff or a cane if I'm taking a long walk or at the mall.

And lately my hands have started to become temporarily but painfully paralyzed. I don't know why yet, but it's scary. Ain't old age fun? I wonder what's next . . .

:old:

DPO
05-24-2016, 03:01 PM
I also suffer pain daily with PMR. For me medication works and enables me to function, others have success using natural remedies or diet changes. The important thing to remember is that we are all different and what works for me may not work for others. Travel the road that works for YOU.

bonesigh
05-24-2016, 06:49 PM
Sometimes going to doctors is a pain in itself. Most do not listen in my experience. I have been suffering for years and have yet to find a doctor who seems to care enough to try to diagnose what may be going on in my situation. They act like I'm a hypochondriac or say menopause or just LOSE WEIGHT. Losing weight when you feel like, um, well you know, is darned HARD. I've seen many a doc. I do however like the new eye doc I'm seeing. Nice guy that listens. Getting a test soon for Sjogren's disease. Chuck is so right about the inflammation and I AM working on change. Essential oils have actually helped quite a bit. Guess I need to try the PH. Gosh but I do hate fermented foods though, so far! But if it actually works it would be better than the pain, lol (: Good day to you all. BTW anyone else notice that people are driving just CRAZY today. What is it....the blue moon or something!

drbekken
05-24-2016, 10:06 PM
I have played instruments since I was six. My main instrument is piano, but guitars, ukes, accordion and tuba are also played frequently. Playing instruments is a physical activity. It is crucial to train endurance, playing position, muscles, breathing etc etc. So what do I do? I swim one thousand meters each day of the week. I have made it a priority. To be able to keep up my piano playing on a pro level at my age (52) I need that exercise even more than the actual instrument practice. So far, I have avoided pain altogether, and my arms and shoulders always find a relaxed position while playing. It's a good thing, and I feel privileged.

Teek
05-24-2016, 10:25 PM
Chuck is right!

Find and cut out foods that cause inflammation. look them up, see if cutting them out of your diet does anything for you. Big offenders are grains, sugar, dairy, chemicals and additives. I cut out nightshade plants like tomatoes and white potatoes and reduced my hand and joint pain by about 90%. I can't handle sodium benzoate, I had to figure that out on my own 30 years ago. You do a trial where you cut the food out for a week at minimum, then introduce it by itself and wait to see what happens. If nothing, go on to the next.

Find the foods that fight inflammation and add them to your diet.

We don't, as a nation! get enough magnesium, so try supplementing 200-400mg of magnesium glycinate a day (the most absorbable form and least irritating to the gastrointestinal tract). I thought I was going to need back surgery, my lower back would go into spasm so bad I couldn't get off the floor. 400mg a day fixed that, also no more restless leg syndrome or foot cramps. It also reduces anxiety. If I eat a lot of grain, and I have gluten issues, my hands swell and hurt and I gain weight overnight and get headaches.

You might have some food or environmental sensitivities. I inherited a ton of allergy genes so I have a lot of sensitivities, but it took me until a few years ago to realize my postnasal drip was caused by dairy. Cut the dairy (butter is okay for me) and zero snot. I can't handle very much natural gas (heaters or gas stoves) or petroleum distilates, so gasoline, exhaust, perfumes, etc. make me feel ill.

Move, stretch, walk, be active. Just gentle stretching 20-30 minutes a day can make a big difference. We sit way too much.

I am using Jamie Andreas' Guitar Principals (it works for ukulele too) to learn correct form and become aware of and release tension, in order to reduce strain and because correct form makes for better playing. It's reasonable and intelligently and precisely presented.

I have had most doctors dismiss me for stuff that later, when doctors got smarter and foods and chemicals and environmental triggers were tested, was accepted as a real and valid concern. Hellllooooo. I had figured out years ago from reading the leading edge of nutrition etc. what the medical community is just starting to accept.

These days it's still mostly "Yeah yeah here take this pill, or stop taking that one that works for you because I don't like it". When I found the rare doctor who listened without their ego, I didn't have trouble getting help. I was walking around with several broken vertebrae because the doctor I saw at the time didn't assess me correctly and dismissed me. So they healed badly. I have a smart woman doctor now that I really like. I can ask an intelligent question and get an intelligent answer. Hallelujah.

Joyful Uke
05-25-2016, 06:11 AM
"Jamie Andreas' Guitar Principals"

I see 2 books on Amazon, and am wondering which one you recommend?

Thanks to all for the various ideas.

For those concerned that people might not go to a doctor if needed, maybe we can look at this as preventative measures vs. trying to treat something. If we can prevent pain in the first place, all the better.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-25-2016, 08:41 AM
Chuck is right!

Find and cut out foods that cause inflammation. look them up, see if cutting them out of your diet does anything for you. Big offenders are grains, sugar, dairy, chemicals and additives. I cut out nightshade plants like tomatoes and white potatoes and reduced my hand and joint pain by about 90%. I can't handle sodium benzoate, I had to figure that out on my own 30 years ago. You do a trial where you cut the food out for a week at minimum, then introduce it by itself and wait to see what happens. If nothing, go on to the next.

Find the foods that fight inflammation and add them to your diet.

We don't, as a nation! get enough magnesium, so try supplementing 200-400mg of magnesium glycinate a day (the most absorbable form and least irritating to the gastrointestinal tract). I thought I was going to need back surgery, my lower back would go into spasm so bad I couldn't get off the floor. 400mg a day fixed that, also no more restless leg syndrome or foot cramps. It also reduces anxiety. If I eat a lot of grain, and I have gluten issues, my hands swell and hurt and I gain weight overnight and get headaches.

You might have some food or environmental sensitivities. I inherited a ton of allergy genes so I have a lot of sensitivities, but it took me until a few years ago to realize my postnasal drip was caused by dairy. Cut the dairy (butter is okay for me) and zero snot. I can't handle very much natural gas (heaters or gas stoves) or petroleum distilates, so gasoline, exhaust, perfumes, etc. make me feel ill.

Move, stretch, walk, be active. Just gentle stretching 20-30 minutes a day can make a big difference. We sit way too much.

I am using Jamie Andreas' Guitar Principals (it works for ukulele too) to learn correct form and become aware of and release tension, in order to reduce strain and because correct form makes for better playing. It's reasonable and intelligently and precisely presented.

I have had most doctors dismiss me for stuff that later, when doctors got smarter and foods and chemicals and environmental triggers were tested, was accepted as a real and valid concern. Hellllooooo. I had figured out years ago from reading the leading edge of nutrition etc. what the medical community is just starting to accept.

These days it's still mostly "Yeah yeah here take this pill, or stop taking that one that works for you because I don't like it". When I found the rare doctor who listened without their ego, I didn't have trouble getting help. I was walking around with several broken vertebrae because the doctor I saw at the time didn't assess me correctly and dismissed me. So they healed badly. I have a smart woman doctor now that I really like. I can ask an intelligent question and get an intelligent answer. Hallelujah.

You couldn't be more right Teek. It sounds like we've been on similar paths.
I believe I've developed my sensitivities as a result to long exposure to lacquers, solvents and other things related to my work. (I built much more consciously these days.). It came on suddenly and got much worse before I discovered a natural approach that wa much healthier for me in the long run than taking drugs and the harsh negative side effects. The only side effects from eating and living healthy is a better quality of life. It's quite a bit harder than taking a pill and keeping our bad habits though. It takes commitment but you soon learn and appreciate new healthy patterns.

strumsilly
05-25-2016, 09:54 AM
I'm a bit reluctant to take part in this discussion publicly because I've gotten some heat in the past for choosing an alternate, or common sense route, rather than a traditional one. When I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis several years ago it threatened to end my career as an uke builder and change my life as I knew it forever. Every joint of my body was wracked with severe pain. One doctor even advised me to start shopping for wheel chairs because he was doubtful I'd be walking in a year. I took that as a challenge.
Joint pain is caused by inflammation, which happens to be the cause of many of our modern diseases. So do some research on anti inflammatory diets. There's a huge amount of information available. Supplements like omega three oils, turmeric and ginger, glucosamine, vitamin D, are just a few natural daily additions to your diet that can be helpful. I underwent a total dietary change, eliminated the processed foods and refined sugars from my diet. The moment that really turned my life around was when I discovered that eating foods that raised my body's PH eliminated most of my pain within days. Foods that raise the body's PH are raw foods and fermented foods, like kimchee and sauerkraut. We all know the kinds of foods we should eat and those we should avoid. By changing my diet I have pretty much reversed my disease without the use of medications. It's worth trying, it's worked for me. And without medication. (Accupuncture has also worked for me in relieving pain albeit temporarily.)

BTW, the person who opened my eyes on this subject is a medical doctor. He also happens to be an ukulele fanatic and a good customer of mine. Many of you know him or have met him during his travels around the world and the country and he's always happy to play for you at an airport, restaurant, ukulele cruise or wherever you happen to run into him. He's one of the most loving and caring people I have been blessed in my life to know. Although not his specialty, his sharing of his knowledge and wisdom with me about pain and inflammatory diseases gave me my life back. If you are willing to put some effort into it you can manage,reduce or even reverse you pain. I am not suggesting that change. in diet and lifestyle, including stress management, are the only was to address this issue but it works for me.

Good luck and the best of health to all of you. Life's too short to live it in pain. I hope you find a way that works for you.
this is exactly what my wife has been telling me. she also makes her own yougart and kambocha? I'm hurting so bad I've got to try this. the ways I'm dealing with it are only making it worse . thanks guys [gals?]

Nickie
05-25-2016, 03:13 PM
I take a turmeric capsule every day. It sure helps.

bonesigh
05-25-2016, 03:47 PM
All the advice here is really good (: I've been on a journey for over a year now finding holistic ways to heal. Cut out all gluten over year ago. Noticed that I did feel better but now it's not noticeable. Pretty much the only thing I eat is meat, fish, cheese, yoghurt, fruit, oatmeal, deli turkey n salami, veggies, some corn based cereal, occasional potato (like in a stew) and skinny pop popcorn from Costco. Oh, almond milk, sometimes Lactaid. Lot's of Mio ice tea. I cup coffee with cream (gosh I love that!) That's mostly it. I'm going to try the fermented food and the turmeric (I've heard of that one before). I already take a healthy dose of magnesium through a drink powder I got via my functional med doc. Still taking vit D supplements in pretty high amounts. Still low according to blood tests. Adrenals are ALL off kilter. I'm working hard at it (: Glad some of this stuff has relieved the pain for some!

I'd like to hear some more people chime in. You never know what you may hear that could help.

bonesigh
05-26-2016, 06:03 PM
Tiz true Bill. Gone a bit astray on topic yet the way one feels altogether really affects playing. One uke thing I'm especially struggling with is carpel tunnel (least that's what they say it is). It's not painful as it is for many. Just very annoying as my fretting hand is constantly falling asleep, except for the pinky finger. Sometimes when switching fast to a bar chord I'll get a sharp knife pain (really hurts!) but short lived and I can shake it off and keep going. Got some great advice from Craig and Sarah Chee about hand position. I don't think it's that that is causing it though.

Joyful Uke
05-27-2016, 12:12 PM
Gone a bit astray on topic yet the way one feels altogether really affects playing. One uke thing I'm especially struggling with is carpel tunnel (least that's what they say it is).

I agree that the way one feels has a big effect on playing, including whether or not one even picks up the ukulele at all on a given day.

One book that was recommended for dealing with carpal tunnel syndrome is:
"Conquering Carpal Tunnel Syndrome and Other Repetitive Strain Injuries" by Sharon Butler:
http://www.amazon.com/Conquering-Carpal-Syndrome-Repetitive-Injuries/dp/1572240393/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1464383406&sr=1-1&keywords=sharon+butler

To heed the warnings of some here, I'll add that it might not be right for everyone, but it's a book of exercises, with a way to help you decide which exercises might be the ones to focus on for you, and people I know who have used the book say that it has been very helpful.

bonesigh
05-27-2016, 05:41 PM
I'll look into it. Thank you Joy (:

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-27-2016, 05:58 PM
All the advice here is really good (: I've been on a journey for over a year now finding holistic ways to heal. Cut out all gluten over year ago. Noticed that I did feel better but now it's not noticeable. Pretty much the only thing I eat is meat, fish, cheese, yoghurt, fruit, oatmeal, deli turkey n salami, veggies, some corn based cereal, occasional potato (like in a stew) and skinny pop popcorn from Costco. Oh, almond milk, sometimes Lactaid. Lot's of Mio ice tea. I cup coffee with cream (gosh I love that!) That's mostly it. I'm going to try the fermented food and the turmeric (I've heard of that one before). I already take a healthy dose of magnesium through a drink powder I got via my functional med doc. Still taking vit D supplements in pretty high amounts. Still low according to blood tests. Adrenals are ALL off kilter. I'm working hard at it (: Glad some of this stuff has relieved the pain for some!

I'd like to hear some more people chime in. You never know what you may hear that could help.

When I got serious I eliminated read meats, most grains, ALL sugars (including lactose and fructose in my diet. From your list that would include meat, cheese, yoghurt, fruit, oatmeal (except for steel cut) deli meats and salami (highly processed foods!!!), corn anything and potatoes. (That's the short list.) Of course that may sound extreme and I only did that for a month but it brought my quality of life back to me (amongst doing other things.) Today I am more moderate in my diet but those things you listed can all be considered trigger foods. The hard thing about this is that it can take a lot of experimenting to find out what works for you. Or you can just take a pill. Not my recommendation but one
that many choose.

janeray1940
05-27-2016, 06:12 PM
They act like I'm a hypochondriac or say menopause or just LOSE WEIGHT.


Adrenals are ALL off kilter.

Bonesigh - This is straying a bit OT and if you would like to PM me, please feel free; for now I'll keep it brief. The mention of adrenals set off alarms for me - have you had your aldosterone-renin ratio tested? Long story short, I once had trouble losing weight, was in a lot of pain, and was written off by a good half-dozen doctors as either menopausal, fibromyalgia, or stressed-out, none of which turned out to be the case. I had an adrenal tumor, and while I'm fine after having the tumor removed, I did learn that most doctors are absolutely clueless about how to deal with this condition and it's especially hard for women since we're almost *expected* to gain weight and complain of pain in middle age. PM me if you'd like more info.

DPO
05-27-2016, 06:20 PM
When I got serious I eliminated read meats, most grains, ALL sugars (including lactose and fructose in my diet. From your list that would include meat, cheese, yoghurt, fruit, oatmeal (except for steel cut) deli meats and salami (highly processed foods!!!), corn anything and potatoes. (That's the short list.) Of course that may sound extreme and I only did that for a month but it brought my quality of life back to me (amongst doing other things.) Today I am more moderate in my diet but those things you listed can all be considered trigger foods. The hard thing about this is that it can take a lot of experimenting to find out what works for you. Or you can just take a pill. Not my recommendation but one
that many choose.

I think if that works for you then that's awesome, however many of us in the "pain club" have sought medical advice and have taken the traditional route. I take 5 milligrams of Prednisone every day and am pain free for another 24 hours, with NO side effects. I guess we are all different in how we deal with this, but I believe the first port of call should always be your health professional.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-27-2016, 09:04 PM
Yes it is awesome. Thank you! But this is why I am reluctant to speak of my successes. You have asked my advice before privately and have rejected my suggestions. I respect your right to do as you wish with your body. Hopefully anyone who needs pain relief will consider all the options and come to their own healthy conclusions.

DPO
05-27-2016, 10:39 PM
Yes it is awesome. Thank you! But this is why I am reluctant to speak of my successes. You have asked my advice before privately and have rejected my suggestions. I respect your right to do as you wish with your body. Hopefully anyone who needs pain relief will consider all the options and come to their own healthy conclusions.

Well forgive me for not taking your advice Chuck, it was after all just advice, and the reason it was private is because you contacted me privately. At the end of the day the best option for me was to follow the tried and tested route of the medical profession, as i said I am pain and side effect free, that surely is the goal we all seek.
Kind regards.

Moore Bettah Ukuleles
05-28-2016, 08:56 AM
Well forgive me for not taking your advice Chuck, it was after all just advice, and the reason it was private is because you contacted me privately. At the end of the day the best option for me was to follow the tried and tested route of the medical profession, as i said I am pain and side effect free, that surely is the goal we all seek.
Kind regards.

I'm truly happy that you've found a method of pain relief that works for you. Hopefully you will never have any side effects from the medication you are on. Pain is something that few people who haven't been through it can fully understand. Any method of reducing or eliminating it as long as it safe can not be criticized. Whatever works is great. We are amongst the fortunate who have found relief for their pain. For many people there seems to be no recourse at all using any method. My heart goes out to these unfortunate people. When you're in pain you need to do anything it takes, be it naturally or with medications or a combination of both, in order to preserve your sanity and maintain a healthy quality of living.
Discussions like this often go the way of discussing politics, religion, or low G vs re entrant tuning. I've thrown out a couple of suggestions that I hope some have found useful but I certainly don't think I'm going to change anyone's minds. My only suggestion is that people do their homework and look at the alternatives.

stevejfc
05-28-2016, 10:03 AM
I'm truly happy that you've found a method of pain relief that works for you. Hopefully you will never have any side effects from the medication you are on. Pain is something that few people who haven't been through it can fully understand. Any method of reducing or eliminating it as long as it safe can not be criticized. Whatever works is great. We are amongst the fortunate who have found relief for their pain. For many people there seems to be no recourse at all using any method. My heart goes out to these unfortunate people. When you're in pain you need to do anything it takes, be it naturally or with medications or a combination of both, in order to preserve your sanity and maintain a healthy quality of living.
Discussions like this often go the way of discussing politics, religion, or low G vs re entrant tuning. I've thrown out a couple of suggestions that I hope some have found useful but I certainly don't think I'm going to change anyone's minds. My only suggestion is that people do their homework and look at the alternatives.

Oh gawd, please not another low G vs re entrant tuning discussion! (ha,ha).

Seriously though, doing your homework and looking at alternatives with an open mind is the best approach.
Like Chuck, I'm hypersensitive to solvents, and prolonged exposure causes severe joint pain and swelling. Fortunately I'm no longer around them that often, but even a slight exposure causes pain and swelling particularly in my hands. My old MD had me on numerous western medicine prescriptions, most of which caused side effects, but did nothing for the joint pain. My wife mentioned my condition to her Homeopathic doctor who suggested that I try 1000mg of high quality cold water cod liver oil per day. Guess what? Works great.......virtually eliminated the pain, even with occassional exposure to solvents. Who would have thought?
So I'm not suggesting everyone run out and get your cod liver oil................but keep an open mind to what may appear to be diffent and/or unusual treatments.
Oh, and don't get me going on diets.........................geez, I really miss an occassional BBQ spare rib!

DPO
05-28-2016, 07:50 PM
I'm truly happy that you've found a method of pain relief that works for you. Hopefully you will never have any side effects from the medication you are on. Pain is something that few people who haven't been through it can fully understand. Any method of reducing or eliminating it as long as it safe can not be criticized. Whatever works is great. We are amongst the fortunate who have found relief for their pain. For many people there seems to be no recourse at all using any method. My heart goes out to these unfortunate people. When you're in pain you need to do anything it takes, be it naturally or with medications or a combination of both, in order to preserve your sanity and maintain a healthy quality of living.
Discussions like this often go the way of discussing politics, religion, or low G vs re entrant tuning. I've thrown out a couple of suggestions that I hope some have found useful but I certainly don't think I'm going to change anyone's minds. My only suggestion is that people do their homework and look at the alternatives.

We both arrived at the same destination, we simply traveled different paths. Peace.

bonesigh
05-30-2016, 04:11 PM
Okee dokee (: Never hurts to talk. That's how I found out that I 'may' have Sjogren's syndrome. Sill waiting for the test to arrive.


Bonesigh - This is straying a bit OT and if you would like to PM me, please feel free; for now I'll keep it brief. The mention of adrenals set off alarms for me - have you had your aldosterone-renin ratio tested? Long story short, I once had trouble losing weight, was in a lot of pain, and was written off by a good half-dozen doctors as either menopausal, fibromyalgia, or stressed-out, none of which turned out to be the case. I had an adrenal tumor, and while I'm fine after having the tumor removed, I did learn that most doctors are absolutely clueless about how to deal with this condition and it's especially hard for women since we're almost *expected* to gain weight and complain of pain in middle age. PM me if you'd like more info.

bonesigh
05-30-2016, 04:31 PM
Kind of wish I lived on a farm. I'd get my own chicken and turkey and raise some talapia. Yum. If only I had the energy. How does one find the energy to do what needs to to get energy! Lol, like you said, those that don't suffer just have absolutely NO idea. I'm working at it though! Thanks for all your advice (:


When I got serious I eliminated read meats, most grains, ALL sugars (including lactose and fructose in my diet. From your list that would include meat, cheese, yoghurt, fruit, oatmeal (except for steel cut) deli meats and salami (highly processed foods!!!), corn anything and potatoes. (That's the short list.) Of course that may sound extreme and I only did that for a month but it brought my quality of life back to me (amongst doing other things.) Today I am more moderate in my diet but those things you listed can all be considered trigger foods. The hard thing about this is that it can take a lot of experimenting to find out what works for you. Or you can just take a pill. Not my recommendation but one
that many choose.

stevejfc
05-30-2016, 04:42 PM
Kind of wish I lived on a farm. I'd get my own chicken and turkey and raise some talapia. Yum. If only I had the energy. How does one find the energy to do what needs to to get energy! Lol, like you said, those that don't suffer just have absolutely NO idea. I'm working at it though! Thanks for all your advice (:
The chickens and turkey sound great Janet.........I'm just not sure about the tilapia. Anyway, keep working at it..........you never know what might come along:o

plastuku
01-02-2017, 07:30 PM
Think about changing the biomechanics of your playing.

When I got my first uke, I didn't know if I'd be able to play one at all, and it was hit or miss for a while with the arthritis in my hands. I had bought a low-priced uke just because I didn't know if I'd be able to use it at all.

I ran up against a chord (I don't recall which one) that I simply could NOT finger. I was trying all kinds of things, and finally tried fretting one of the strings with my thumb. That almost worked, and in trying to get it to work a little better, I wound up with the uke sitting flat across my lap.

Then a light went on. I tried again, and I could play everything.

Every chord is easier that way, because you're pressing down with your whole arm instead of pinching the strings against the neck with your wrist and fingers.

For me, this made the difference between playing and giving up completely. It looks odd, but it works.

Michael N.
01-03-2017, 01:15 AM
I think we need to be a bit careful, separate out the true medical conditions from conditions that are a result of poor body posture. I'm very much in the latter camp, in fact I've been injured on every single instrument that I've tried - guitar, ukes, recorder, violin and piano.
If you are experiencing pain whilst playing an instrument you are almost certainly doing something wrong. Probably the biggest factor are shoulders and each instrument seems to have a related condition. Guitarists and uke player tend to push their shoulders forward, violinists tend to push their left shoulder up and clamp down with the chin. Wind players tend to crane their neck forward. None of these are really medical problems. They are a problem of incorrect posture. An incorrect approach to playing the instrument. The doctor might be able to treat the symptoms but it's highly unlikely that they are going to instruct you on how to hold and play your instrument. As such it is not a medical or a dietary problem.
These days virtually every music college/conservatoire has an Alexander specialist attached to them. They are there for good reason. They know that a certain percentage of their students (on whatever instrument) is going to experience pain and tension/posture issues. Once you lose the efficiency of the body it is highly likely that your playing will go rapidly down hill. At best you will plateau. Even if you aren't a believer in Alexander technique (and I'm not sure that I am) they are experts at body posture. Of course some instrument teachers will also be able to spot potential problems within a few minutes.
As for physical exercise/yoga. It's unlikely that by themselves they will solve the problem. They certainly don't do any harm and I truly believe that they are a very useful tool in helping to correct posture. Mostly you need a bit more than physical exercise though, you need to retrain the mind as well.

willisoften
01-03-2017, 04:01 AM
I don't know enough about dietary causes of inflamation to comment other that to say its seems difficult to sort fact from pseudo-science. Due to poor lifestyle I was recently diagnosed with diabetes 2 so I have pretty much cut refined sugars from my diet, not entirely; the medical guideline is less than 10g per hundred in a given item of food. However, I no longer add sugars to cereal and I avoid biscuits with coffee or tea, jams on toast and scones and so on. I still take a treat at the weekend ( marmalade on toast for Sunday breakfast). My sinuses have improved, less inflamation equals easier breathing and I've lost a bit of weight so my Concert sits at a better angle when I play mind you my sopranos have lost the shelf they used to sit on.....

UkieOkie
01-03-2017, 10:28 AM
I have terrible structural back problems. My posture while playing certainly matters, but I can't really stay in any one position too long. The best thing for my back has been losing weight by eating clean foods and learning to stretch.

jddennis
01-04-2017, 04:10 AM
In terms of playing, I've been lucky to avoid a lot of pain in my hands and arms. My formal music training was in classical guitar pedagogy, so I came to the ukulele knowing a lot about how to properly apply ergonomic technique.

I do avoid playing if I have a lot of pain. Let me give you an example. I've been doing lap swimming and water walking for general exercise, and last week I overdid something. I had a lot of soreness and inflammation in my right shoulder. It actually hurt all weekend. So I set aside the ukulele until it felt better. Actually, I didn't pick it up until yesterday.

One thing that affects my playing is my feet. Last summer, I was diagnosed with plantar fasciitis, due to overly high arches. I wear shoe inserts every day, but avoid standing up to play for long periods to avoid causing issues with that.

Let me say this: If you're having a lot of pain in your wrists or your forearms, please see a doctor. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome will do more to end your ability to play than anything else.

arpie
01-04-2017, 04:40 PM
Without having read the whole thread - I hope I am not repeating someone else's suggestion! :o

I have arthritis in the base of my thumb & find it difficult if not impossible to do barred chords - so I don't use them very often.

One of my group has rather severe RSI on her left wrist, making it impossible for her to form chords without extreme pain - she is seeing specialists about it but it is taking time to 'come good'.

In the mean time, I've suggested she try putting the uke on her lap or on a table & have a go at doing TAB instead so she doesn't have to do 'chords' as such ..... as it makes it easier to understand how to play TAB if the printed TAB is on the table in front of the uke (which is also on the table.)

Some people also play & strum regular chords this way!

Croaky Keith
01-05-2017, 12:38 AM
There's a thread going at the moment about playing lap uke style, maybe worth looking at. :)
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?124900-Lap-Uke

plunker
01-05-2017, 02:39 AM
Hey, see if there is a massage school in town. Offer yourself as training material. I don't mean to offend anyone. But I would think it would be hard to mess up a message. There are great ones and OK ones. Never got a bad one.

Rllink
01-05-2017, 04:54 AM
This is just an anecdotal story about my experience with pain, but I do think that it illustrates something. A year and a half ago I was running a lot and I started getting pain in my heel. So I did more stretching exercises and took some ibuprofen and that didn't help. But then my friend diagnosed me with plantar fasciitis, because he had that one time and knew everything about it, so I started doing different exercises that he suggested and bought some arch supports for my shoes, just like he told me to get. The good ones, you know. But things got worse, I quit runningl, but I could still walk. So I tried to make up for the lack of running by walking everywhere. In the mean time, three other friends diagnosed me with plantar faciitis and gave me sage medical advise and I tried it all, but the pain got worse. To the end of this story. After a year of my friends treating my foot pain. I went to my doctor for a physical. My doctor diagnosed me with a bruised heel. Everything that I had been doing was aggravating the bruise. The arch supports were changing the angle of my foot, causing me to put even more weight on it and causing even more bruising, as were the exercises that my friends were advising me to do. At my "doctor's" suggestion, I bought shoes with lots of cushion and absolutely no arch support. Put rugs on my ceramic tile floors where I stood most of the time. Changed things around so that I spent more time on the carpeted floor. Walked on the grass instead of the sidewalk. Made every effort not to spend hours on end standing on hard surfaces. Guess what, my doctor knows more than my friends. I'm back running.

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10-17-2018, 12:27 AM
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Jerryc41
10-17-2018, 02:16 AM
Jake said he started using a strap because he was having shoulder pain.

Dansimpson
10-17-2018, 02:50 AM
Cannabid Oil, vaped. It sure helps the arthritis pain in my knees, and if I dont use it for a couple of days they hurt like hell.
Thing is, what works for one person may not work for you, so I guess its a matter of trying things until you do find a suitable method/pain killer.
I was told that the worst thing for my knees was inactivity, but was caught in the loop of if I walked around they hurt, if I didnt they were fine, but appaently I was making it worse by not using them, so tried usual chemist shop stuff without success, then my daughter bought me some vape juice with this cannabis oil extract in it, bingo !!