PDA

View Full Version : What to do with wood



robinboyd
05-25-2016, 05:22 PM
I recently posted in Uke Talk, lamenting the fact that some beautiful wood from a tree that we cut down was going to end up as firewood. A few people convinced me to save a few logs before they were split in the hope that I could get someone to turn them into a ukulele later on. The logs that I have are about 50 cm long by about 30 cm in diameter. Probably a barely useable size, but we were in a hurry when we were chopping them up and hadn't thought further than firewood at the time. I was just wondering exactly how you I should treat them in the short term to maximize my chances that they will be usable in the future. Can anyone help?

By the way, we now have about 30 tonnes of fire wood. We won't be getting cold anytime soon!

sequoia
05-25-2016, 07:12 PM
You never said what "kind" of wood this is. Important. Also your dimensions are very small for resawing. Also the wood in an ukulele is only really a small part of the process. It is making that wood into an ukulele that is the hard part.

robinboyd
05-25-2016, 07:17 PM
Sorry, it's silver wattle. (a type of acacia that's similar to Tasmanian blackwood).

As for making it into a ukulele, I was hoping to get a professional to do that in a few years. For now, I just want to know what to do with the wood right now (it is totally green) so that it is usable in the future. On the other hand if it has already been cut too small and is unusable, let me know that too, and I'll split it up for firewood.

sequoia
05-25-2016, 07:29 PM
I don't know squat about silver wattle and I'm guessing you are from Down Under? A little research shows it is an acacia species which produces fine ukuleles... If you are serious about this project I would suggest you contact somebody to resaw the wood or do it yourself and season it. Keep in mind that almost any wood can be used to make an ukulele. See: 2x4 ukulele.

robinboyd
05-25-2016, 07:44 PM
That's what I was thinking, but what thickness should I saw it (or get it sawn)? I understand that I should paint the ends with wax and stack so as to create air flow around whole of each piece to prevent uneven moisture loss. I'm also guessing that I want to keep as much width as possible in the planks. My thought is not too thin at this stage to prevent warping and so that I have excess to plane off if it does warp a bit. Also, should I get it sawn ASAP, or should I leave it as a log for now?

I feel totally clueless... Sorry to bother you guys...

Oh, and yeah, I'm from down under...

Michael Smith
05-25-2016, 09:05 PM
it's best to slice the acacias green and sticker the slices in such a way that they dry evenly and don't warp. Slices should be quarter sawn as closely as possible. Thickness of slices depends a little on the quality of your resaw setup and blade. I would go for a little over 1/8" for tops and backs and a little under for sides. But again this depends on blade and if it us cutting perfectly flat. It can be harder to resaw green lumber. I have silver wattle growing in my back yard here in California. It's very nice to work with but often not terribly dramatic. The sliver acacia I have resawn tends to stay very straight. Warping has never been a problem with this wood. It sands nicely and bends easily, doesn't split and has small pores. Ideal in may ways.

robinboyd
05-25-2016, 09:30 PM
Thanks. Yeah, not terribly dramatic when sawn with the grain, but I love the warm colours. It is very dramatic when sawn across the grain, but not much good for anything that way.

robinboyd
05-25-2016, 09:48 PM
Oh, just contacted a sawmiller who is happy to turn them into planks for us. That makes things easier.

Thanks for the help, guys.

robinboyd
05-25-2016, 10:08 PM
I'll attach a close up of the wood on the weekend, but here is a picture of me splitting one of the smaller logs from that tree for firewood.

91429

sequoia
05-26-2016, 07:22 PM
I have silver wattle growing in my back yard here in California. It's very nice to work with .

Thanks Michael for the heads up. I just noticed that there is some of the stuff growing just up the road from my house here in Little River, California. The weird yellow flowered acacia wood that everybody thinks they get allergies from. What I wonder is how did it get here??? Obviously imported. But why?

Silver acacia

91463

robinboyd
05-26-2016, 08:08 PM
Yep, that's the stuff. No idea why. Ours is native...

robinboyd
05-27-2016, 11:43 PM
Just in case anyone is wondering, this is what our firewood looks like.

91489

mainger
05-28-2016, 12:14 AM
Just in case anyone is wondering, this is what our firewood looks like.

91489

Oh wow! Imagine a 1-piece top/back with this! Yummy!

robinboyd
05-28-2016, 12:50 AM
Oh wow! Imagine a 1-piece top/back with this! Yummy!

Yep. That's why splitting this for firewood has been killing me. I've salvaged 4 or 5 reasonable sized logs now (much bigger than the one in the picture) and I'll take them to a saw miller next week, so we'll see if we can get anything useable out of it.

Titchtheclown
05-28-2016, 02:36 AM
My little corner of the world is blessed with over 80 different types of acacias. Unfortunately we are not allowed to go out and cut them down and the most were cut down and burned to make way for sheep paddocks and Radiata pine plantations. Given the number of different species of acacias we have it would not surprise me if the identification of species was alittle off.

http://canberranaturemap.org/Community/CategoryGuide/73

robinboyd
05-28-2016, 01:50 PM
My little corner of the world is blessed with over 80 different types of acacias. Unfortunately we are not allowed to go out and cut them down and the most were cut down and burned to make way for sheep paddocks and Radiata pine plantations. Given the number of different species of acacias we have it would not surprise me if the identification of species was alittle off.

http://canberranaturemap.org/Community/CategoryGuide/73

I suspect you might be right. We were lucky that this one was on our block and the council required us to clear it for bushfire prevention reasons. Plus, this tree would have stood right in the spare bedroom.

TheBathBird
05-28-2016, 10:55 PM
Thanks Michael for the heads up. I just noticed that there is some of the stuff growing just up the road from my house here in Little River, California. The weird yellow flowered acacia wood that everybody thinks they get allergies from. What I wonder is how did it get here??? Obviously imported. But why?

Silver acacia

91463

Ooh, that's what we call Mimosa, it's a beautiful tree. My parents' garden in France was full of it, the whole area was actually, it was quite spectacular when they all came into flower. It grew like a weed, with little suckers popping up all along the roots.