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mainger
06-14-2016, 03:12 AM
I feel like I'm spending too much time in front of the screen and not enough time reading. I already have "Understanding Wood: A Craftsman's Guide to Wood Technology" by Bruce Hoadley. It's wonderful.

Anybody got any recommendations for similarly good reads? Wood is the favoured topic, but a well-written luthierie book would also be of interest to me.

Thanks!
Germain

greenscoe
06-14-2016, 04:20 AM
'Guitarmaking Tradition and Technology' by Cumpiano and Natelson is a good old standard for makers of classical or steel strung acoustic guitars. It dates from 1987 so the many photos and illustrations are in black and white.

Pro makers (and some hobby makers) today will use lots more power tools and jigs than are used in this book, but it shows every operation and gives tips and warnings along the way. Its a very practical book and could be used as a guide to making an instrument. Check out reviews on Amazon (approx 20 softback in UK).

The skills learned/required to make a guitar are similar to those required to make most other stringed instruments.

Red Cliff
06-14-2016, 09:27 AM
This is my favourite book on wood:


91865


Sorry, couldn't resist. :D

dofthesea
06-14-2016, 12:24 PM
A great investment is The Somogyi set or the Gore/Gilet set both have almost TMI haha Pretty much the industry standards at this point. Don't believe the hype all the same principles for guitar building apply to Ukulele building.

Michael N.
06-16-2016, 01:45 AM
This is my favourite book on wood:


91865


Sorry, couldn't resist. :D

Actually that's a pretty good book!

mainger
06-16-2016, 03:34 AM
My (kid's) bedside favourite :D

mainger
06-16-2016, 03:36 AM
Thanks! Having read the sample chapter online, I have put the Somogyi set in my amazon wishlist. At that price :O , it's going to need to be a Christmas present...

Thanks!
Germain

mainger
06-27-2016, 03:28 AM
A great investment is The Somogyi set or the Gore/Gilet set both have almost TMI haha Pretty much the industry standards at this point. Don't believe the hype all the same principles for guitar building apply to Ukulele building.

Looking at buying the Somogyi set... Substantial investment... Can someone who has both enlighten me about how much overlap there is between the two volumes? I will gladly buy both, if there is not too much overlap, but at $100 a book, I'd rather make sure before I pull the trigger.

Thanks!
Germain

dofthesea
06-27-2016, 11:32 AM
Not too much overlap. Somogyi has a totally different building style/philosophy then Gore/Gilet methods. Both sets focus on One book is for building techniques and one book is for design/theory. If I would have had a choice when I first got the books I would have preferred to just get the building and not the design books as it was a lot of info to process when I was a beginner. There is about 25 other important books as well so just bite the bullet and buy both sets.

chuck in ny
06-27-2016, 12:34 PM
there's no good book on nearly any subject in a definitive sense. there are a lot of resources that you are meant to take a little from one thing and a little from the other and mostly learn from experience. in the end it's quite personal, about you personally and how things strike you and what will work for you. the beauty part is when different sources have completely opposing viewpoints.

mainger
06-28-2016, 02:46 AM
OK, thanks for the sound advice. I'm very keen to read his work, mostly because the sample chapters read very nicely, and I really enjoyed watching some video interviews of him, and I like reading well-written work by people who know their stuff. I'll buy both :)

mainger
06-28-2016, 02:49 AM
there's no good book on nearly any subject in a definitive sense. there are a lot of resources that you are meant to take a little from one thing and a little from the other and mostly learn from experience. in the end it's quite personal, about you personally and how things strike you and what will work for you. the beauty part is when different sources have completely opposing viewpoints.

Oh, I totally agree with you. I just like reading that kind of books, for the sake of learning, and not in a bid to find the definitive source of anything in particular. It's like having a great class by a great teacher. There is still a lot to learn, and many different teachers to get education from :)