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Timbuck
06-24-2016, 04:44 AM
After spending most of my early life in industry working mostly with metals ..I have finally come to terms in wood working..Yesterday I dry fitted a dovetail joint together and was very please with the tight fit...This morning the same joint is now a sloppy fit :( I can live with this and now accept you cannot work to a thousandth of an inch with wood..Steel yes! You can.:) ...I recently got an eMail from a violin make asking how accurate one of my string spacing gauges was cos he was considering buying one..I gave him an honest answer of about .005" the approx: thickness of 2 human hairs...He replied that's not good enough for me I want it spot on..this made me smile cos I realised that he had no real experience in working to fine limits as you would in an engineering tool room...and even then you are given tolerances to work to...spot on is just a myth...nowadays it's a pleasure just to work to a scribed line or pencil mark? Who cares if the wood moves about a bit it's great to work with ..
My Dad was a Toolmaker and he loved working with wood mostly making toys for us kids in the post war days...He used to say wood work is just the same as metalwork only you make more progress.

tobinsuke
06-24-2016, 05:19 AM
Here here! (Or is it hear hear?).

Doug W
06-24-2016, 10:28 AM
I have been an electrical designer/draftsman for the last 35+ years. We never have to deal with tolerances. If it doesn't fit, hit it hard with something metal or buy a bigger box. How do you determine a tolerance of 0.005" anyway?

Timbuck
06-24-2016, 12:47 PM
I have been an electrical designer/draftsman for the last 35+ years. We never have to deal with tolerances. If it doesn't fit, hit it hard with something metal or buy a bigger box. How do you determine a tolerance of 0.005" anyway?
On the drawing it will be quoted as + / - .0.005" so you can be up to 5 thou big or down to 5 thou small and it will be ok..outside of these limits is not acceptable ;)

printer2
06-24-2016, 01:47 PM
How do you determine a tolerance of 0.005" anyway?
.
.
.
.
Measure?

Bob Orr
06-26-2016, 10:42 AM
Before I retired I was a commercial bank manager (yes I have heard it all before!) and one of my clients was a precision engineering company doing prototype work for Westland Helicopters among others. He explained that the difference between precision engineers and everyone else was that they worked to tolerances of thousandths while everyone else was "cock in sock" !

I showed one of my ukes to one of my ex clients recently and he said "just goes to show that not all bank managers are useless!

Cheers,Bob