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View Full Version : Any info on Córdoba 32 T CE or 30 series in general?



steel rider
06-29-2016, 07:09 PM
I was at Ukulele Source in San Jose and picked up a Córdoba 32 T and the CE with LR Baggs pickup for $599. I've never played a spruce top Uke before but man I liked this. Ive never considered this brand before but apparently the 30 Series is new, designed with Pepe Romero (whatever that actually means), hand made somewhere, and good.

Anyone have one or experience with one?



Thanks!

steel rider
06-29-2016, 09:02 PM
But then again this Pono looks very nice, and I'm familiar with Pono. http://www.theukulelesite.com/shop-by/size/tenor/pono-mtd-sp-spruce-top-mahogany-tenor-deluxe.html
I love HMS and they've been great. I'd really like to buy something from Ukulele Source or Music Works this time to support them.

kvehe
06-30-2016, 01:02 AM
I have a 30T (mahogany, no electronics) that I bought in the FMM about three years ago. I wanted it because they're said to be braced like classical guitars and sound more guitar-like (a plus for me). I was disappointed, and it sits in the back of the closet, being retrieved to have its humidifier refilled. It probably deserves a second chance with different strings. Having said all of that, since you actually played it and liked it, go for it. I like my Córdoba guitars very much.

Osprey's comment (thank you!) reminded me that I really should try a set of Southcoast ML-WB on it. They turned a $37 Caramel tenor into something quite nice.

Osprey
06-30-2016, 02:58 AM
I have a Córdoba 35T-CE. It is my low G with Southcoast HML-WB strings. I really enjoy it. It has a full rich sound. The fit and finish is excellent. You feel the quality every time you pick it up.

Choirguy
06-30-2016, 04:10 AM
I think the ukulele site carries Cordoba, and if they don't have it, they might be able to get it.

You may also want to check out the Koahloa Opio Tenor from them, which is in that same price range. I have started to listen to their podcast and they really like that instrument.

KanePono
06-30-2016, 02:42 PM
I own a Córdoba 32T (no cutaway or electronics) that I purchased from a neighborhood music/instrument shop in Washington DC. I am very please with it, other than I paid too much. However the shop was very nice and the staff extremely helpful when I stopped in to "try-out" the Ukes in stock. Previously, I played only my Mahogany concert except for some brief testing of tenors at shops in Hawaii and Washington. I immediately fell in love with the 32T because of the beautiful ringing clarity and sustain of the picked strings. It was and is such a contrast to the Mahogany Concert - very guitar like. While the Lanikai Concert is built like a tank, this Córdoba is like an Ultra-light aircraft, soaring to incredible sonic heights with so little effort. It's is very different than other Ukes. The body attaches to the Spanish heel at the 12th fret and light fan bracing is used for the soundboard. I think this results in a louder than normal tenor ukulele. The neck is wider than most at 1.5" at the nut. The resultant wider string spacing allows for easier chording for some chord shapes, but not all. It is nice to have a little more real estate to move around in. But, the neck is also thin from top to back. I've played mostly guitars with substantially thick necks, so the thin shape of the Córdoba as well as my Lanikai has taken some getting use to. As far as appearance, the Córdoba seems to be well made. The headstock design is unique and a pleasure to behold. The spruce top is very light in color and contrasts nicely with the beautiful rosewood back and sides. I generally prefer darker woods, but the tonal characteristics of the spruce won't be found in cedar, mahogany, or other tropical hardwoods. Over time the color of the spruce may darken. My 42 year old spruce-top Dreadnaught guitar has a rich golden color, but I really can't remember what it looked like when new.

I'm glad I purchased this Córdoba. It looks gorgeous, sounds wonderful, stays in tune, and has excellent intonation. However, I've noticed that the sound board is very lively. With relatively small changes in Rh, the area behind the bridge can get so "wavey" that it looks like a surf line-up on the Northshore. I checkled with Córdoba, and they said this phenomenon is called telegraphing and not unusual for light, fan-braced, stringed lutes. It doesn't seem to affect the sound, tuning or intonation. I've also noticed that all 30 series Cordobas I've seen on the market were manufactured in 2013. I suspect that the company over estimated the demand and the production of new 30 series Uke's will be limited until older stock is sold off. This might also explained why there are occasional 30 series ukes for sale that have "Defects" (cracks, exposed fret ends, moisture and humidity problems). My speculation is that many have just been sitting too long in wherehouses. (So, if you buy on line, make sure that the instrument can be returned if it fails your inspection.)

I plan on switching this Uke to a Low G and using my (also recently purchased) Kala - ATP for reentrant tuning. I like strumming better on the Kala and picking better on the Córdoba. It is nice to have the two Tenors, but if I could only keep one it would probably be the Kala Solid Cedar Top.

steel rider
06-30-2016, 08:24 PM
I own a Córdoba 32T (no cutaway or electronics) that I purchased from a neighborhood music/instrument shop in Washington DC. I am very please with it, other than I paid too much. However the shop was very nice and the staff extremely helpful when I stopped in to "try-out" the Ukes in stock. Previously, I played only my Mahogany concert except for some brief testing of tenors at shops in Hawaii and Washington. I immediately fell in love with the 32T because of the beautiful ringing clarity and sustain of the picked strings. It was and is such a contrast to the Mahogany Concert - very guitar like. While the Lanikai Concert is built like a tank, this Córdoba is like an Ultra-light aircraft, soaring to incredible sonic heights with so little effort. It's is very different than other Ukes. The body attaches to the Spanish heel at the 12th fret and light fan bracing is used for the soundboard. I think this results in a louder than normal tenor ukulele. The neck is wider than most at 1.75' at the nut. The resultant wider string spacing allows for easier chording for some chord shapes, but not all. It is nice to have a little more real estate to move around in. But, the neck is also thin from top to back. I've played mostly guitars with substantially thick necks, so the thin shape of the Córdoba as well as my Lanikai has taken some getting use to. As far as appearance, the Córdoba seems to be well made. The headstock design is unique and a pleasure to behold. The spruce top is very light in color and contrasts nicely with the beautiful rosewood back and sides. I generally prefer darker woods, but the tonal characteristics of the spruce won't be found in cedar, mahogany, or other tropical hardwoods. Over time the color of the spruce may darken. My 42 year old spruce-top Dreadnaught guitar has a rich golden color, but I really can't remember what it looked like when new.

I'm glad I purchased this Córdoba. It looks gorgeous, sounds wonderful, stays in tune, and has excellent intonation. However, I've noticed that the sound board is very lively. With relatively small changes in Rh, the area behind the bridge can get so "wavey" that it looks like a surf line-up on the Northshore. I checkled with Córdoba, and they said this phenomenon is called telegraphing and not unusual for light, fan-braced, stringed lutes. It doesn't seem to affect the sound, tuning or intonation. I've also noticed that all 30 series Cordobas I've seen on the market were manufactured in 2013. I suspect that the company over estimated the demand and the production of new 30 series Uke's will be limited until older stock is sold off. This might also explained why there are occasional 30 series ukes for sale that have "Defects" (cracks, exposed fret ends, moisture and humidity problems). My speculation is that many have just been sitting too long in wherehouses. (So, if you buy on line, make sure that the instrument can be returned if it fails your inspection.)

I plan on switching this Uke to a Low G and using my (also recently purchased) Kala - ATP for reentrant tuning. I like strumming better on the Kala and picking better on the Córdoba. It is nice to have the two Tenors, but if I could only keep one it would probably be the Kala Solid Cedar Top.

Thanks for tthe detailed response

DaveY
07-01-2016, 08:20 AM
just to correct one detail, the width at the nut is 1.5 inches, not 1.75.

I had one briefly, but the body joining at the 12th fret bothered me, as I was used to easier access to those higher notes

1931jim
07-01-2016, 09:48 AM
I was at Ukulele Source in San Jose and picked up a Córdoba 32 T and the CE with LR Baggs pickup for $599. I've never played a spruce top Uke before but man I liked this. Ive never considered this brand before but apparently the 30 Series is new, designed with Pepe Romero (whatever that actually means), hand made somewhere, and good.

Anyone have one or experience with one?
Thanks!
Hello steel rider,
Pepe Romero. I thought that coming from California you would have been exposed to one of the greatest classical guitarists, his son Pepe Romero jr. is a renowned luthier and helped set up the new ukulele factory in China, following his long established guitar fan bracing methods and lightness of build. I enjoy my concert cordoba daily.
regards
Jim.
PS:Happy Canada Day and July 4th to follow on Monday.

steel rider
07-01-2016, 10:12 AM
just to correct one detail, the width at the nut is 1.5 inches, not 1.75.

I had one briefly, but the body joining at the 12th fret bothered me, as I was used to easier access to those higher notes

The one I played was a cutaway so I didn't notice it Jose bed at the 12th. Good to know.

steel rider
07-01-2016, 10:13 AM
Hello steel rider,
Pepe Romero. I thought that coming from California you would have been exposed to one of the greatest classical guitarists, his son Pepe Romero jr. is a renowned luthier and helped set up the new ukulele factory in China, following his long established guitar fan bracing methods and lightness of build. I enjoy my concert cordoba daily.
regards
Jim.
PS:Happy Canada Day and July 4th to follow on Monday.

Well yes I know who he is but I will always question obscure marketing tactics. :)

KanePono
07-01-2016, 12:07 PM
just to correct one detail, the width at the nut is 1.5 inches, not 1.75.

I had one briefly, but the body joining at the 12th fret bothered me, as I was used to easier access to those higher notes

Yes! You are absolutely correct, Dave. My poor eyesight and memory again demonstrates why I should keep my mouth shut and my ears open. Thanks for correcting.

Don

Ukulele Eddie
07-01-2016, 01:11 PM
I have had and enjoyed both 2x and 3x series Cordobas. As one would expect with any moderately priced production uke, individual units can vary quite a bit in terms of build quality. So, make sure you check it thoroughly and confirm that the shop will make necessary setup adjustments.

sculptor
07-02-2016, 09:29 AM
I was at Ukulele Source in San Jose and picked up a Córdoba 32 T and the CE with LR Baggs pickup for $599. I've never played a spruce top Uke before but man I liked this. Ive never considered this brand before but apparently the 30 Series is new, designed with Pepe Romero (whatever that actually means), hand made somewhere, and good.

Anyone have one or experience with one?



Thanks!

I bought a Cordoba 35T-CE. It has the solid acacia body but otherwise it is the same. I bought it from HMS and they accidentally sent me a spruce top by mistake (which they quickly remedied) so I've played a couple different Cordoba ukuleles. One thing I've got to say is that the spruce top had the groves in the nut filed down quite a bit. HMS does a setup on all instruments it sells whereas Ukulele Source doesn't do setups. If I were you I'd have somebody check it out to see if your ukulele needs this done (supposedly this is an adjustment that is often needed for a Cordoba.)

That out of the way, I've got to say I like mine. It's not a super loud ukulele (I can plug it in to my Roland AC-33 if that's ever an issue) and I wish it had the sustain of a high end custom ukulele by a world class builder but it's still a great sounding and looking. The strings it uses are low tension and that makes it easier to play that my other ukulele (a Pono MT.)

-- Gary

jelow1966
07-02-2016, 07:09 PM
I bought a 32t a couple of months ago from a fellow member and I love it. Then again I'm a big fan of spruce tops and very much into flamenco techniques and it excels at it. Just today I'm trying Aquila reds on it in low G to see what they sound like. The Oasis that it came with are very nice but at times a bit too bright. If you like bright sounding, loud ukes with lots of sustain it's a good choice. The wider string spacing is good for fingerpicking but I found that it can make some techniques using two strings a bit harder to do compared to my other ukes. If you liked playing it, buy it. I have not regretted buying mine for a single minute.

John

1931jim
07-03-2016, 06:01 AM
I bought a 32t a couple of months ago from a fellow member and I love it. Then again I'm a big fan of spruce tops and very much into flamenco techniques and it excels at it. Just today I'm trying Aquila reds on it in low G to see what they sound like. The Oasis that it came with are very nice but at times a bit too bright. If you like bright sounding, loud ukes with lots of sustain it's a good choice. The wider string spacing is good for fingerpicking but I found that it can make some techniques using two strings a bit harder to do compared to my other ukes. If you liked playing it, buy it. I have not regretted buying mine for a single minute.

John

When installing and tuning the Aquila Reds be sure to check the individual strings as they pass through the nut and also help the string when tuning as it passes through the nut with your finger and thumb pulling toward the nut and the tuner.