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cml
08-03-2016, 07:24 AM
While waiting for my materials to arrive I'm trying to think through the building steps I'm going to encounter and how to tackle them.

One thing that I'm very much undecided in is what kind of neck joint to use.

I've been contemplating the same principle that Stew-mac suggests in their kit, a couple of dowel plugs and a butt joint. Would this hold up in a tenor?

Otherwise I've thought about using either a bolt on neck, but I'm feeling a bit nervous about drilling perfectly straight down into the neck without a drill press to help me. As I understand it, it's critical to achieve this so the screw is aligned correctly? The screw type I was thinking about using is the one with a wooden screw on one end, and machine threads on the other. I dont know the name for it in English, nor Swedish...:P

Last option is a tenon neck but I'd be worried about doing that cut properly without building a complicated jig for it...

The resources I've used:
Stew-mac method:http://www.stewmac.com/freeinfo/i-5348/i-5348.pdf
Bolt on and tenon joints at Hana Lima:
http://www.hanalima.com/building_spline.shtml

Thanks!

cml
08-03-2016, 08:35 AM
Maybe this is the best way?
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?75083-The-Cherry-Bari/page2
Post #18...That would solve most problems I was foreseeing with a bolt on neck. My only question is, how does one know how deep to drill for the steel barrel nut?
My guess would be to first drill the holes on the neck block before even assembling it. That way a drillpress could be used. Then you could fit the neck in place with a clamp and transfer the holes by pressing a drill bit through the hole. But that leaves the problem of the depth for the barrel nut, how does one do that? Wing it, measure with a vernier caliper? Also, are two bolts necessary or could one make do with only one bolt?

Sorry for the great influx of new questions here in the lounge, lots of things popping up in this noob's head right now. I really really value and appreciate the support of all you guys. You're terrific.

Thanks,
Carl-Michael

RPA_Ukuleles
08-03-2016, 09:08 AM
I'm a fan of a floating tenon for a neck join. It's pretty straight forward to glue a neck in position (without the fretboard) and then by any means you have, (router, chisel, mill, etc.) create a slot that crosses from the heel of the neck and into the neck block, then push in a glued coated tenon. The advantage over dowels is that there are no issues trying to drill perfectly aligned peg holes before the neck is attached to the body.

But my preferred way is to glue the neck "temporarily" in perfect alignment to the body, turn the thing face down on my router table, cut a 1" long by 1.5" deep slot with a 1/4" bit, then drop the tenon down in with "glue to the neck only". Then I can pull the neck off, finish the neck and body separately and simply reassemble and slide the exposed end of the tenon into the slot with some glue and clamp till dry. The alignment is already set as the slot was cut when the joint was temporarily glued in perfect alignment.

cml
08-03-2016, 09:43 AM
I'm a fan of a floating tenon for a neck join. It's pretty straight forward to glue a neck in position (without the fretboard) and then by any means you have, (router, chisel, mill, etc.) create a slot that crosses from the heel of the neck and into the neck block, then push in a glued coated tenon. The advantage over dowels is that there are no issues trying to drill perfectly aligned peg holes before the neck is attached to the body.

But my preferred way is to glue the neck "temporarily" in perfect alignment to the body, turn the thing face down on my router table, cut a 1" long by 1.5" deep slot with a 1/4" bit, then drop the tenon down in with "glue to the neck only". Then I can pull the neck off, finish the neck and body separately and simply reassemble and slide the exposed end of the tenon into the slot with some glue and clamp till dry. The alignment is already set as the slot was cut when the joint was temporarily glued in perfect alignment.
Thanks Rodney! I still think this would be difficult to achieve for me though, all I have access to is a dremel! I'll give it a go on some scrap material once I get my dremel base ready.

cml
08-03-2016, 09:44 AM
They say a picture is worth a thousand words, so here's how I envision doing a bolt on neck:
93117
EDIT:Meh, while trying to be smart, I drew the neck blank upside down at first. I have now updated the pic above.

Would this process work you think?

Sven
08-04-2016, 08:06 AM
Hi cml, try this (or a modified version of it):

http://argapa.blogspot.se/2014/02/new-jig.html

More here:

http://argapa.blogspot.se/2014/09/setting-neck.html

cml
08-04-2016, 10:20 AM
Hi cml, try this (or a modified version of it):

http://argapa.blogspot.se/2014/02/new-jig.html

More here:

http://argapa.blogspot.se/2014/09/setting-neck.html
Thank you so much Sven, exactly what I needed! :D
Easy jig to build but oh so clever. I'll probably skip the dovetail joints though ;)

Thanks,
//Carl-Michael

georgiw
08-04-2016, 04:43 PM
Well, looks like Sven may have the answer you were looking for. You mentioned the half wood screw/machine screw, so I thought I would mention this. In the U.S. it's a "Hanger Bolt", and I used two to attach the neck on my solid body electric soprano. Here is the disclaimer though, I am just finishing this uke up as my very first build!! So don't consider this advise...just consider it random information...that may or may not work!:) Here are a couple pics of what I tried.

Timbuck
08-04-2016, 08:19 PM
One small fastening should be all you need...My bicycle saddle is secured with one M5 capscrew...and I weigh about 225 lbs ;)

cml
08-05-2016, 08:08 AM
One small fastening should be all you need...My bicycle saddle is secured with one M5 capscrew...and I weigh about 225 lbs ;)
Thanks ken! One M6 it is.