PDA

View Full Version : Aquila threads



AndieZ
08-11-2016, 04:28 AM
When I was researching what uke to buy for my first one, i kept hearing about aquila strings but here on this site, it's as if they don't exist. What gives?

cml
08-11-2016, 04:29 AM
When I was researching what uke to buy for my first one, i kept hearing about aquila strings but here on this site, it's as if they don't exist. What gives?
There's like a thousand threads on aquila ;).

whmeltonjr
08-11-2016, 04:48 AM
http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/search.php?searchid=8158962

As stated above, there are tons and tons of them. I've personally found that using the single content search under advanced search, and then searching titles only, tends to bring up the most content related to what I'm looking for.

johnson430
08-11-2016, 05:47 AM
When I was researching what uke to buy for my first one, i kept hearing about aquila strings but here on this site, it's as if they don't exist. What gives?

What do you want to know about them?

here is some info from their website:
http://www.aquilausa.com/Default.html

here is an article about the nylgut with some forum members commenting at the bottom:
http://uke4u.com/5-reasons-dont-use-aquila-ukulele-strings/

i have never been a fan of Aquila nylgut. Also, I didn't like the D'addraio nylgut either.

stevejfc
08-11-2016, 05:48 AM
Many threads from both advocates and nay-sayers.

Mivo
08-11-2016, 07:07 AM
here is an article about the nylgut with some forum members commenting at the bottom:
http://uke4u.com/5-reasons-dont-use-aquila-ukulele-strings/

It strikes me as polemical clickbait, though, and very generalized.

I didn't like the white original Nylgut on the tenors I tried them on (neither C tuning nor their re-entrant G set for tenors), but the white New Nylgut D-tuning strings are by far the best strings I have tried on a vintage soprano, yet I didn't care for the C-tuning soprano New Nylguts. On a heavily built concert, they are great. So, lots of differences within even the same product line. A lot of people say they are "too bright", while he complains about them being "too mellow", just underlining how much depends on the instrument and not solely on the strings.

Then there is the fact that Aquila doesn't just make Nylgut strings, or even one kind of Nylgut. New Nylgut and Super Nylgut are distinctly different, and the Red Series, which is Nylgut with copper powder, is entirely unique. Best strings I have tried, and they sound incredible on the very same tenor that sounded poorly with white Nylgut (also with Ko'olau nylon strings).

But if you prefer to put repackaged, cheap fishing line that is sold at inflated prices on your high end ukes, by all means, they are your instruments! ;)

janeray1940
08-11-2016, 07:14 AM
There was a time not all that long ago when Aquila was one of the few widely-available manufacturers of ukulele strings, so - people talked about them a lot. In the 7 years I've been playing, a number of new string manufacturers have emerged, and Aquila has expanded their options beyond Nylguts. So - part of the reason you may not see a lot about Aquilas as of lately is that people have moved on to trying and discussing other strings.

Also, Aquila changed their Nylgut "formula" a few years back. They're still good strings, but personally I don't care for the "New Nylguts" as much as I did the old formula, so I no longer use them. My strings of choice are Martin Fluorocarbons for my three koa ukes - inexpensive, widely available, and a nice clear bell-like tone.

hoosierhiver
08-11-2016, 07:22 AM
http://www.aquilacorde.com/string-making/?lang=en

Booli
08-11-2016, 09:44 AM
What janeray1940 said: the hype about Aquilas (the standard ones, i.e., the "New" Nylguts which most factory-built ukes come with) is largely historical and nowadays is unjustified except in comparison to plain nylon strings. Nylguts were particularly reputed to bring out the best in laminate ukes, but I find that fluorocarbon strings do this better still, with less of the Nylgut "edge" and with more ring.

I'm firmly in the fluorocarbon camp, although I have left Aquila SuperNylguts on several of my ukes; they're pretty nice. If I get a uke with regular Nylguts, however, I usually switch to fluorocarbons within the first week (if not on the first day)—"premium" strings my ruddy bottom.

This is EXACTLY where I am.^

Nylon strings sound pretty DEAD to me with very little sustain (which I require for Campanella)

ALL Aquila strings except for the REDS (which always break on me, eventually) are similar to NYLON for their (lack of) sustain and (sometimes sweet) tone.

Therefore, with over a DOZEN string companies now selling ONLY fluorocarbon strings, the IMPACT of the Aquila strings is OLD NEWS from and ending in 2013 really.

There was a frenzied fervor here on UU about the ORGINAL Nylguts on a well-setup Makala Dolphin (and later Shark) uke as The UU Sanctioned Holy Grail Starter Uke, but while still maybe a good combination, the HYPE is now (thankfully) a memory.

IMHO, I have observed that RECENT folks loving the Aquila strings are usually either complete beginners that are brainwashed by the pushy salesperson at Guitar Center, OR are coming from Steel String GUITARS or BANJOS or MANDOLIN and think the Aquila strings are bright and 'crisp' sounding. All of this is relative, and these folks have obviously not yet TRIED fluorocarbon strings.

Having said all the above, it is completely ok for anyone to disagree with me and be very happy as strings are a VERY personal choice, and EVERY person has different intent and different opinions for the sounds and feel that they want.

Rllink
08-11-2016, 09:52 AM
When I first started playing the ukulele, which was just a few years back, Aquila Nylgut was the magic strings. There were three or four threads a week about them. They made bad ukuleles sound better, and a good ukulele sound great. But somehow they lost favor. Like everything, they got their fifteen minutes of fame. I'm still using them by the way. I'm thinking that eventually they will come back.

hoosierhiver
08-11-2016, 09:56 AM
What janeray1940 said: the hype about Aquilas (the standard ones, i.e., the "New" Nylguts which most factory-built ukes come with) is largely historical and nowadays is unjustified except in comparison to plain nylon strings. Nylguts were particularly reputed to bring out the best in laminate ukes, but I find that fluorocarbon strings do this better still, with less of the Nylgut "edge" and with more ring.

I'm firmly in the fluorocarbon camp, although I have left Aquila SuperNylguts on several of my ukes; they're pretty nice. If I get a uke with regular Nylguts, however, I usually switch to fluorocarbons within the first week (if not on the first day)"premium" strings my ruddy bottom.

Aquila had a big problem with fake Aquila's coming from Asia. Here's the thread. http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?81849-Take-care-about-asian-fake-Aquila-strings

cml
08-11-2016, 09:59 AM
But if you prefer to put repackaged, cheap fishing line that is sold at inflated prices on your high end ukes, by all means, they are your instruments! ;)
Have you bought fishing line lately? It's anything but cheap :P! Especially so the flourcarbon tapered leaders...

I cant claim to have tried many kinds of strings, but I've gone through Aquilas: New Nylguts, Super Nylguts and Reds, and of those I only really like the reds. Sadly they created a buzz on my soprano and didnt work out. I've not had issues with them breaking on that uke. On a previous concert, they were too bright imo and did break.

Apart from that, I've tried Worth CMs and Worth Browns, both of which I prefer to all Aquila strings. Not to bash Aquila in any way, it's just my own preference - fishing line or not. The browns are warm and mellow and the clears work really really well on my KoAloha concert.

hawaii 50
08-11-2016, 10:02 AM
here is a sample from few months back.....btw I use flourcarbon strings too....

http://www.theukulelesite.com/shop-by/brand/kamaka.html

bacchettadavid
08-11-2016, 10:15 AM
I will be the dissenting opinion. I use Worths (fishing line) on my Koaloha soprano, where I love punch and chime. I use Aquila reds (wound low G set...not sure yet if I prefer the unwound or wound low G) on my Kala tenor, and D'addario Nyltechs (a derivative product of nylgut) on my Kanile'a super concert.

I love Living Waters on the Kanile'a for their strong upper partials, but the Nyltechs really bring out the uke's potential for warm, dark tonal colors. If I didn't have the Koaloha soprano for playing baroque music, I would probably string the Kanile'a up with Living Waters.

cml
08-11-2016, 10:21 AM
https://www.amazon.com/Seaguar-Knotless-9-Feet-Fluorocarbon-Tapered/dp/B0094FS1PS
Just an example of a leader, you get ONE tapered leader for your fly fishing kit for roughly 10$, which is almost the same you get a set of strings for. ;)

Mivo
08-11-2016, 10:31 AM
Have you bought fishing line lately? It's anything but cheap :P! Especially so the flourcarbon tapered leaders...

The comment was tongue-in-cheek and a bit of play on the linked article and a recent interview with Ko'olau's owner in the HMS podcasts. :)

Personally, I have come to realize that very little about ukuleles can be generalized. I tried specific strings that sounded fabulous on one ukulele on another where they sounded truly bad. Same material, same product. That happened more than once with different materials and brands. The differences weren't even subtle and down to the daily mood, but really substantial.

So really, from where I stand, lists of reasons why this or that material is great or bordering to unbearable, or statements that only clueless newbies like this brand and the real pros use that brand, seem of little use to the individual who wants to find a sound that they like and strings that work for the instrument that they have. Corey can play on anything and he sounds godly, and the rest of us will just have to look around until we find something that makes us sound more like we want to sound. Strings are cheap, changing them becomes much less daunting after the first few times, and it is fun to experience the differences.

Like Rollie said, this forum is an endless carousel of ever changing mass preference, and while it's a fun ride that provides entertainment and something to talk about, it's probably worthwhile to remember that today's golden strings are tomorrow's old hat.

Nickie
08-11-2016, 04:23 PM
And don't forget the Lava series. I don't think there's much diff between them and the new Nylguts, but they sure look cool. I hated em on my Ohana, but they are great on my Cocobolo.

AndieZ
08-11-2016, 04:53 PM
Thanks all.

Pier
08-13-2016, 11:27 AM
I come from a "strings schizofrenia" period, in which I couldn't decide what I liked most on my two sopranos.
First I tried the Super nylgut, and on my cheap laminate uke they didn't change much from the black nylon stock.
I then tried the New nylgut, and found them to be better on that uke. On the same uke I tried fluorocarbon and d'addario black nylon, but both were lacking in bass frequencies, so I came back to new nylgut.

On my Ohana sk38 I started with stock new nylgut, and I didn't liked them. I tried the Super nylgut, and fell in love, but soon tried the fluorocarbon from D'addario, which hit me right in the heart... for a couple of months...
They were bright, clear and with lot of sustain, but after a while I understood that from my sopranos I wanted short sustain and a fuller sound, not the crispy bright tone of fluorocarbon.

So I tried black nylon, but they were too mellow and low in volume (but wonderfully sounding), and went back to Super nylgut. Since then I found peace.

I love the mellow sound and short sustain, over the bright and modern fluorocarbon (which reminds me the steel string guitar...), and the overall sound is fuller and richer.

Also, I really like the gauge in the super nylgut set, it has the perfect balance in tension.

Griffis
08-13-2016, 03:55 PM
Which are typically thicker--nylon or flouro? I can't ever remember...

Mivo
08-13-2016, 04:15 PM
Nylon strings are typically thicker, unless they are wound. (Are there wound fluorocarbon strings?)

kohanmike
08-13-2016, 08:21 PM
Aquilas are thicker. Mivo, are you making a joke? There are umpteen fluorocarbon strings out there.

Mivo
08-13-2016, 08:59 PM
Mivo, are you making a joke? There are umpteen fluorocarbon strings out there.

Wound fluorocarbon strings? I imagine they exist, but the only wound strings I have used had nylon and Nylgut inside, and when I wrote my response, I realized I never actually used a fluorocarbon set that included a wound string. There's no wound fishing line, and it seems (open for corrections on that) that string makers don't make their own fluorocarbon strings, but buy them from appropriate factories. That's different with nylon and Nylgut strings.

janeray1940
08-13-2016, 10:03 PM
Wound fluorocarbon strings? I imagine they exist, but the only wound strings I have used had nylon and Nylgut inside, and when I wrote my response, I realized I never actually used a fluorocarbon set that included a wound string. There's no wound fishing line, and it seems (open for corrections on that) that string makers don't make their own fluorocarbon strings, but buy them from appropriate factories. That's different with nylon and Nylgut strings.

Great question! You made me have to stop and think about this - I use wound strings for low G but have never once given the slightest consideration to what was under all that wound stuff, nor can I find a quick answer to that. The only mention of the material used for the core of a wound string that I found in my 5 minutes of Googling was Oasis - they include a wound low G in their fluoro set, but it's got a nylon, rather than fluoro, core.

Pier
08-13-2016, 10:26 PM
I don't know if there are wound fluorocarbon for ukulele, but for guitar there are, so if you need one, you can buy singles from d'addario and other brands.

Anyway, strings are 100% a personal preference.

I often hear people wanting long sustain and bright tone, but I'm on the other front, and like short sustain and mellow tone, "vintage style". I can't get that tone with fluorocarbon matched with my ukes, and Aquila are the best match so far.

The hype about them is all related to the cited fact that years ago there were fewer choices, and Aquila usually had more volume compared to nylons and black nylons.
Today there are more choices, more brands...

However, the only reason why many brands only sell fluorocarbon is because they don't have to produce them. Everyone can buy fishing leader and do a packege. Few can hqve the machines to produce extruded or rectified nylon, or nylgut.

PS: aquila strings were already famous for guitar and other instruments, before the ukulele :D

Mivo
08-13-2016, 10:31 PM
Now I got more curious about this too and took a closer look at the Aquila Red Series low-g wound string for tenor size: it's a red copper-nylgut string under the wound stuff. No wonder it harmonizes so well with the three trebles in the set.

Croaky Keith
08-13-2016, 11:28 PM
Which are typically thicker--nylon or flouro? I can't ever remember...

Generally - nylon are thicker than flourocarbon. :)