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songsforall
08-18-2016, 03:40 AM
Have been playing finger style for a year or so with reentrant. General folk picking has been a challenge since a single note is often doubled in the same octave (former guitarist here).

If I should play with linear tuning, are there standard chord sheets for linear tuning that are different from reentrant tuning? i can figure chords out on my own, but was just wondering if there is already something out there, just to make it quicker and easier from the start....I have found plenty of sheet music for linear, but not any chord sheets to refer to. Thanks for suggestions.

Croaky Keith
08-18-2016, 03:47 AM
Don't worry about linear & re entrant, a chord is a chord. :)

Just play the same shapes if it's in the same key.

johnson430
08-18-2016, 03:58 AM
Don't worry about linear & re entrant, a chord is a chord. :)

Just play the same shapes if it's in the same key.

Uke1950 is right.
Just play the same shapes.

SteveZ
08-18-2016, 05:07 AM
Have been playing finger style for a year or so with reentrant. General folk picking has been a challenge since a single note is often doubled in the same octave (former guitarist here).

If I should play with linear tuning, are there standard chord sheets for linear tuning that are different from reentrant tuning? i can figure chords out on my own, but was just wondering if there is already something out there, just to make it quicker and easier from the start....I have found plenty of sheet music for linear, but not any chord sheets to refer to. Thanks for suggestions.

For GDAE, any mandolin chord chart works fine. For CGDA the charts for tenor guitar and tenor banjo also are okay. i found them via Google and looked on "Images."

engravertom
08-18-2016, 05:44 AM
Well, the chord shapes are the same, and the notes of the chords are the same, but they will sound different. I like the low g for fingerstyle, but prefer the sounds of the chords on re entrant tuning. Everyone has different taste, but some of the regular chords on a low G sound bad to me. That low G can really stand out. maybe trying different strings would help.

Choirguy
08-18-2016, 06:40 AM
I think it is mainly what you get used to. My Opio Tenor is my first linear instrument, other than my bargain Lanikai LU-21B Baritone Ukulele. The more I play the Opio, the more I get used to those chord sounds, and now the baritone, which I used to leave alone because of the difference in sound based on the low D, gets some more playing time, too.

bearbike137
08-18-2016, 06:44 AM
Yeah, the only difference between chords in high G versus low G is that the chords in high G sound better... :)

:shaka::nana:

Uncle Rod Higuchi
08-18-2016, 07:25 AM
Hey bearbike137, I like your Avatar! :)

keep uke'in',

janeray1940
08-18-2016, 08:00 AM
Well, the chord shapes are the same, and the notes of the chords are the same, but they will sound different. I like the low g for fingerstyle, but prefer the sounds of the chords on re entrant tuning. Everyone has different taste, but some of the regular chords on a low G sound bad to me. That low G can really stand out. maybe trying different strings would help.

I agree with this completely, especially when it comes to first-position chords - the note on the low G string sometimes becomes the bass note and while the chord is technically correct, it's an inversion and may not have been the sound the arranger was going for in a reentrant arrangement. I personally don't care for low G for strumming at all.

Osprey
08-18-2016, 09:55 AM
I agree that the same chord played on high G and low G tuned ukuleles sounds different. I don't agree that you can assume that one always sounds better. I have two tenors one each linear and reentrant. Some styles of music sound better on one some on the other. I like and use both.

Ukejenny
08-18-2016, 12:20 PM
The octave difference on that one G string can really change the feel of a song, a chord, totally change it. I love low G, but find myself drawn a little to the chords on up the neck.

bearbike137
08-18-2016, 06:18 PM
I disagree with the high-G snobs:

"Snob"? Wow.

I much prefer "high-G bigot". :)

Croaky Keith
08-18-2016, 11:21 PM
High G - low G - high D - low D - High C - low C - it's all down to personal taste - I like different tastes! :)

stevejfc
08-19-2016, 03:00 AM
With finger picking you will most likely enjoy linear. A finger picking ex-guitar player will find it far more intuitive than re-entrant.

PeteyHoudini
08-22-2016, 03:12 PM
I arrange most of the uke songs I do (some classical, some folk and originals with vocals too) based on re-entrant tuning. What that really means is that I am often doing cross-string playing of the melody going from the first string (A) to the 4th string (G). Having a low G uke messes up such arrangements. Even for just strumming chords with a low bass note on the G string... one has to arrange differently. Nothing wrong with a low G uke. There is a difference in sound no matter what anyone might say.

Cheerio!

Petey