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bandmom
09-01-2016, 03:13 PM
I am NEW to Ukuleles-I need help understanding some of the differences, looking at Baritones?????

teryg
09-01-2016, 04:11 PM
I am NEW to Ukuleles-I need help understanding some of the differences, looking at Baritones?????

Look around on youtube. I learned the differences by reading up a little on some websites, but having someone show me the differences and play so I could hear the differences was really helpful.

teryg
09-01-2016, 04:12 PM
And be prepared to get lost in youtube. There is so much ukulele stuff on youtube that a couple of hours can blow by before you know it.

bacchettadavid
09-01-2016, 05:12 PM
Welcome to UU, Bandmom.

A good place to start would be here, where the Hawai'i Music Store compares five sizes of the same model: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eFUJbJqvcz4. Baritone begins at 4:50.

Mivo
09-01-2016, 05:15 PM
A baritone ukulele is bigger than the other sizes, and it is usually tuned DGBE, like the first four strings of a regular guitar. The relative tuning is the same as the ukulele's standard tuning, so the chord shapes are the same (but are for different chords), so if you play by yourself, you can just play the material that is for low-G ukuleles. The scale length of baritone ukuleles is often between 19" and 20.5". Some people use re-entrant tuning with their baritones (dGBE, with a high-D), and there are also strings for C-tuning (GCEA) for baritones.

If you have any specific questions about the differences, feel free to ask here. :)

Croaky Keith
09-01-2016, 09:21 PM
Biggest difference between baritone & 'regular' ukes is in the tuning, as Mivo says above.

Different woods give different tones as well, as do different strings, so there are options after buying your first uke - though many of us end up just buying more ukes of different sizes. :)

AndieZ
09-01-2016, 11:57 PM
Its usually not recommended to get a baritone as your first uke. That's becuase the chords are different and probably a lot of other things as well. If you want one with a deeper tone, just go for the tenor.

JackLuis
09-02-2016, 01:32 AM
I've been playing uke for ~18 months and have all sizes of ukes, due to UAS and a love of Zebra wood. I've been playing C6 tuned ( Club Tuned or GCEA) and G tuned, (or dGBE) ukes for the last six months. The difference in playing C and G tuning really isn't that great. though it can be confusing when switching between them.

Unless you have small hands I'd recommend a Concert size to begin with. It's handy and has some fret room, can be strung low or hi g and is less plinky than a soprano. The fret spacing is easier to deal with and as you develop your dexterity you can try out the Tenor or Baritone later. Most people have a concept of a stringed instrument from a guitar point of view and the concert gives you some body but the Uke tone.

If you like a Baritone sound you can tune a Tenor to dGBE (high d) using standard Tenor strings or specialty strings sets. Tenors are a lot handier that a Baritone and easier to carry around. I sort of prefer the softer feel of standard gCEA fluorocarbon strings just now, and they are easier to get. Tenors fret spacing is easier to deal with than Baritones in the beginning and they still have most of the resonance of a Baritone body, depending on the individual uke.

You can have just as much fun on a $50 uke as you can on a $500 uke, though some aren't happy unless they can brag about their affluence. I'd love to have a Nalu baritone I saw/played at my local Uke shop, but $750 is out of my league just now. There are a lot of ways to have fun with ukes, just get one set up well that makes a lot of difference in ease of playing and learning.

DownUpDave
09-02-2016, 02:09 AM
I am NEW to Ukuleles-I need help understanding some of the differences, looking at Baritones?????

If you come from a guitar background or just like the size and sound of the bigger baritone it is a fine instrument to start on. I am not sure what you mean by "understanding some of the differences". If it is price range that usually comes down to type of materials with laminates being cheaper and all solid woods being more expensive.

Different types of wood will give a different sound as well, spruce being on the bright side while cedar and mahogany being on the warm or mellow side. Different sizes ie soprano, concert, tenor and baritone have very different voices and people will tend to gravitate towards one over the others. Physical size can also make a difference in how comfortable you feel holding and playing the instrument.

mrStones
09-02-2016, 03:30 AM
Unless you have small hands I'd recommend a Concert size to begin with. It's handy and has some fret room, can be strung low or hi g and is less plinky than a soprano. The fret spacing is easier to deal with and as you develop your dexterity you can try out the Tenor or Baritone later. Most people have a concept of a stringed instrument from a guitar point of view and the concert gives you some body but the Uke tone.


Totally agree. Bigger the size, harder the tension and if you are not accustomed (or "trained") it can be frustrating starting with a Tenor... or a Baritone.
But if you are already a guitarist, probably you'll find at home.
Soprano has the opposite problem IMHO. Requires a precision that you have to acquire to play correctly.
Concert is the ideal middle-earth, "more natural" to start. Not too hard, not too small.
Have Fun ! And Welcome !

Mivo
09-02-2016, 05:27 AM
Totally agree. Bigger the size, harder the tension and if you are not accustomed (or "trained") it can be frustrating starting with a Tenor... or a Baritone.

I don't think this is a rule. It depends on the strings, their gauges, and the tuning. The tension on one of my concerts is noticeably higher than the tension on my baritone. If anything, I find the two bass strings somewhat floppy on a baritone. I've played sopranos with higher tension than my baritone.