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View Full Version : Slightly flat intonation a good thing?



shalomjj
09-16-2016, 12:29 PM
Just got a new uke and love the sound of it. I checked with a tuner and noticed the intonation is very slightly flat. Yet, to my ears it sounds better than other ukes that are on or slightly sharp. I think I read somewhere once that intonation is better slightly flat. Any thoughts?

Nickie
09-16-2016, 12:43 PM
I dunno, I think either is annoying. But if it's consistently flat, maybe tuning it slightly sharp would work? If it sounds good to you, what the heck?

librainian
09-16-2016, 01:19 PM
I think there is some truth to the idea that it's better to be slightly flat than slightly sharp. You will find references to this a lot when learning slide guitar. When you use a slide to get that tremolo effect, they always tell you slide up to and slightly below the fret and don't go back and forth across the fret for the same reason.

Jim Hanks
09-16-2016, 01:59 PM
Personally I like the sound of a slightly sharp intonation than slightly flat. But slightly flat might be easier to "pull up" by pressing harder or

anthonyg
09-16-2016, 02:17 PM
Slightly (being the key word here) flat intonation sounds better to me than slightly sharp intonation. When your intonation is slightly flat you can fret firmly or even with a slight side pressure and your just bending the note up to pitch. If you start with sharp intonation then anything less than perfect technique is only going to make the note sharper still.

Anthony

Rllink
09-17-2016, 06:49 AM
I saw your other thread. What do you mean by flat intonation? Do you mean that when you tune the open strings, then it is flat up the neck from there? Because that is never going to be good. If you are just talking about just tuning it a little flat, I guess that if you play with yourself, it doesn't really make any difference. But a lot of the time I play with other people and with other people with other instruments. Anyone who is not in tune with everyone else stands out. So out of habit, I try to stay in tune.