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sequoia
09-28-2016, 07:37 PM
I really like the way I can glue in bindings with CA glue. Below pictures of today's effort. Everything will clean up nice and look perfect after sandout. My question: I've used this method before with no problems at all, however I do wake up at 4:00 am in the morning thinking: Is this joint going to hold over the long run. Has anybody that uses this method had a binding joint failure? I'm probably just being paranoid, but there is an awful lot riding on that joint and I would hate to see the binding peeling off. From all appearances the joint is solid as the hammers of hell, so why do I worry? Ukulele Builder Paranoia Syndrome (UBPS) or Real Reason for Concern? How does CA glue hold up over time and moisture change? I have never seen a failure so why do I worry? UBPS?

94653 94654

tparse
09-28-2016, 11:42 PM
I have never glued in bindings any other way. I have never had a glue joint failure with CA glue. My guess is those joints will still be good after all of the other types of glue you use have failed. Unless someone soaks it in acetone for about 30 minutes it's not going anywhere...
Don't ask me how I know this..

Timbuck
09-28-2016, 11:45 PM
I glue mine with CA...I some times leave a bit of my DNA behind when my fingers get in the way.

Michael N.
09-28-2016, 11:58 PM
It will probably be fine if you select the right type of CA. Sometimes CA doesn't glue well because it effectively starves the joint. So the first application of CA might result in a poor bond but then you apply more and it's fine. Obviously the first application seals the wood and consequent applications don't soak in like a sponge. No doubt it's something to do with the viscosity. I don't use CA for building, it's fine if everything goes well. If you get a gap or you need to remove a section it's a pain. Clean up is much harder than HHG and of course HHG isn't too difficult to reverse.

Yankulele
09-29-2016, 01:41 AM
I don't know about its durability either, though I imagine it would be fine as long as it's good quality. I can say that, as one who is still figuring a lot of things out, I just installed my bindings with liquid hide glue because I like the longer open time. When I found one small gap after unwrapping, it was remarkably simple to warm it up with an iron, drip in a bit more glue, and clamp it back in place. I've been using hhg binding the head stock, and I really like being able to redo these joints when my purfling slips or my miters don't line up like I thought they would. Plus, the dogs love to dig the clean up paper towels out of the trash.

Nelson

Michael N.
09-29-2016, 02:37 AM
Yes, that's the advantage. With the tape method it's very easy to use HHG on bindings/purfling. Really no need to rush or the need for long open times.

resoman
09-29-2016, 06:01 AM
John Calkin uses CA and I asked him about it. He reminded me that radio controlled airplanes have been using CA for years without failure. I should have known this as I built R/C airplanes for years. The only failures I had with R/C were self inflicted. So his thinking and mine, now, is that if CA will hold up to those kind of stresses it should hold up pretty well as binding glue.

sequoia
09-29-2016, 07:27 PM
I glue mine with CA...I some times leave a bit of my DNA behind when my fingers get in the way.

Of course working with this stuff, getting your fingers glued to things happens all the time and it is not that big a deal. But this time I seriously glued my thumb to the end graft. I was holding the butt joint at the tail and was adding accelerator while holding the joint... And guess what? My thumb was seriously glued to the end graft. I know enough about this stuff that you don't wait around and think about it, but get off as soon as possible no matter the cost to skin. I did get away, but it hurt like hell and I left a lot of DNA there. They do sell CA neutralizer stuff and I'm going to get some. That was a little bit scary. Can you imagine showing up at the Emergency Room with a ukulele glued to your thumb? That would make their day. Hey play us a tune uke Boy!

Wildestcat
09-29-2016, 10:57 PM
After several similar experiences of becoming glued to a variety of household objects as well as instruments, I never ever work with CA without a bottle of debonder, cap off & ready to go within easy reach! The worst offender in my book is the super thin stuff that can leak down the side of the bottle onto your fingers without being noticed .. until you touch something else. :o

Michael N.
09-30-2016, 02:10 AM
Acetone will remove it. Not the type that is used for nail varnish because that likely contains other stuff. You want pure unadulterated acetone. Mighty smelly but it dissolves CA, so you want to open a window with the hand that isn't glued to the uke.
Actually the debonder might contain acetone in a gel form.

Timbuck
09-30-2016, 03:19 AM
Of course working with this stuff, getting your fingers glued to things happens all the time and it is not that big a deal. But this time I seriously glued my thumb to the end graft. I was holding the butt joint at the tail and was adding accelerator while holding the joint... And guess what? My thumb was seriously glued to the end graft. I know enough about this stuff that you don't wait around and think about it, but get off as soon as possible no matter the cost to skin. I did get away, but it hurt like hell and I left a lot of DNA there. They do sell CA neutralizer stuff and I'm going to get some. That was a little bit scary. Can you imagine showing up at the Emergency Room with a ukulele glued to your thumb? That would make their day. Hey play us a tune uke Boy!
Yes it can get scary..A few times I have had to reach for a sharp blade to insert between my glued skin and the bindings and slice my skin away :(

fungusgeek
09-30-2016, 04:09 AM
I always always put on thin disposable rubber gloves before working, even a little, with CA glue. I could not imagine working with it in a bare-skin environment, even for a little bit. I keep gloves handy right next to the CA glue, and reach for the gloves first.

Wildestcat
09-30-2016, 10:58 AM
I always always put on thin disposable rubber gloves before working, even a little, with CA glue. I could not imagine working with it in a bare-skin environment, even for a little bit. I keep gloves handy right next to the CA glue, and reach for the gloves first.

I tried nitrile gloves - the CA burnt through them! Maybe its OK with latex?

fungusgeek
09-30-2016, 03:26 PM
I have been using vinyl gloves with no problems of 'burn through' but then, I don't tend to get a lot on the gloves in any case. CA is wonderful stuff, but it is a bit scary and I'm careful when handling it.