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View Full Version : Teaching?? I don't think so.



Rllink
09-29-2016, 08:34 AM
I'm just saying that I'm not a ukulele instructor, and I don't want to be one.

stevejfc
09-29-2016, 08:50 AM
I'm with you.......I've got enough problems teaching me

Uncle Rod Higuchi
09-29-2016, 09:28 AM
just think of 'teaching' as sharing the info you know and use, with someone else, esp someone who asks for assistance.

you're probably 'teaching' all the time, and just don't consider it 'teaching' :)

of course, formally preparing something for a group of people who expect to learn something from you, and are paying
you for the experience, ... that can be off-putting and daunting... but doable :) you must prepare yourself and be aware
of the needs of your students. OK, that may have been too 'simple', but teaching is sharing information for the benefit
of the hearer.

anyway, keep uke'in', :)

Kimosabe
09-29-2016, 09:59 AM
I'm teaching a guy now who has a great ear and a knack for song writing. He doesn't know anything about music theory other than what he hears intuitively. So, I'm helping him go further. I write myself and so we're co-writing, spring-boarding off of each other. He has a beautiful voice and I have a way with chords. We both have a way with melody and we both have deep respect and love of standards.

So, I'm teaching him for free and I'm getting taught by him. We inspire each other. That's what I like. No money involved.

spookelele
09-29-2016, 10:00 AM
being able to do something and being able to teach it... 2 completely different skill sets

Rllink
09-29-2016, 10:21 AM
being able to do something and being able to teach it... 2 completely different skill sets

I agree with you. I'm not a teacher. Leave that to people who know how to teach.



but teaching is sharing information for the benefitjust think of 'teaching' as sharing the info you know and use, with someone else, esp someone who asks for assistance.

you're probably 'teaching' all the time, and just don't consider it 'teaching' :)




I don't agree. It isn't just passing information. You don't just go sit down on a Saturday afternoon over beers and teach someone to play the ukulele. It is much more than that. But when people ask me if I will teach them how to play the ukulele, I tell them to go to Uncle Rod's Ukulele Boot Camp, get a few songs under their belt, and come back. We'll jam.

Uncle Rod Higuchi
09-29-2016, 10:39 AM
Thanks for the 'plug', I appreciate it! :)

let's all keep uke'in' and helping each other :)

Joyful Uke
09-29-2016, 11:03 AM
You all are teaching me every time I read posts and ask questions here. Not the same as formal teaching, but you all are teachers.

There are lots of different teaching styles, (and theories), so one person's fantastic teacher might not be a good teacher for someone else, though.

Sven-Uke
09-29-2016, 11:28 AM
Oh man. Teaching take sooo much patience.
I use all mine up for my own very slow moving progress :)

Choirguy
09-29-2016, 01:35 PM
I'm just trying to understand the purpose of the thread. As a music teacher, I guess I'm at a rare loss of words?

PhilUSAFRet
09-29-2016, 01:40 PM
Depends on how you define "teaching." To me, it's an active process of deliberate actions designed to present information that will allow the learner to "learn" the basics of how to play the ukulele and all that goes with it. It often involves demonstrations, both hands on and hands off, lecturing using visual aids including handouts, a chalk or marker board, as well as visual aids that include instruments and accessories. This is because I have a strong background in formal "instruction." I also believe that there are other less formal strategies to teach something. It's my understanding that most of the Hawaiian uke legends learned by observing an older player, often dad, grandfather, or uncle, This is how they "taught" and it obviously worked. Of course if the student doesn't study their instrument and practice, it really doesn't matter what method of instruction is used.

PhilUSAFRet
09-29-2016, 01:41 PM
I'm just trying to understand the purpose of the thread. As a music teacher, I guess I'm at a rare loss of words?

Yeah, I kind of had to ruminate on it a bit. :confused:

Ukejenny
09-29-2016, 02:53 PM
I love teaching, but have a lot to learn about teaching ukulele. I also love learning, and usually pick up as many things teaching as a student probably gets from my ramblings.

Rllink
09-29-2016, 04:01 PM
I'm just trying to understand the purpose of the thread. As a music teacher, I guess I'm at a rare loss of words?The purpose of the thread is to say that just because someone can play the ukulele, that does not make them a ukulele teacher. There is much more to teaching. Good ukulele teachers are good teachers first.

Luke El U
09-29-2016, 05:17 PM
I enjoy teaching only people who are serious about learning an instrument and growing as a musician. These folks I'll happily teach for free. (If this is you and you live in Guangzhou, China, please feel free to contact me.) People who just want to pick up the instrument once in a while and plunk a chord or two can go bug somebody else. My time isn't worth their money.

bunnyf
09-29-2016, 06:56 PM
I thought I was a pretty patient person, but I tried to teach a few relative beginners and found out that I am probably not as patient as I thought I was. I wound up showing them Justin's tips on learning to make a clean chord and then how to practice chord changes. Then told them they'd have to work on that before they could really move on to anything else. I felt frustrated because it's hard to help folks who seem like they just aren't putting any practice time in. One lady had long nails on her fretting hand and I couldn't really help her at all except to tell her to cut her nails. Teaching's apparently not for me.

kohanmike
09-29-2016, 07:38 PM
They say one of the best ways to get better at something is to teach it to someone else. After retiring 10 years ago from being a propman in the movie studios for 25 years, and diligently using a Macintosh for 20 years, I started teaching people how to use their Macs. Although I was told I'm a good teacher, I finally gave it up a couple years ago because too many of my clients never took the time to practice what I was teaching them. It became very frustrating that they kept making the same mistakes or asked to be shown the same things over and over again.

I couple of weeks ago one of the members of the uke group I'm with asked some of us to participate with her to teach middle school kids the uke. I opted out, just couldn't bring myself to be put in that frustrating place again.

mountain goat
09-29-2016, 09:29 PM
people gotsta wanna learn.

Croaky Keith
09-29-2016, 10:00 PM
I'm more of an enabler than a teacher, I can show what I do, & can normally explain how I do it, but it's down to the person to learn the best way for them how to do it. ;)

1/2
09-30-2016, 04:46 AM
By answering questions, giving advice, sharing videos of songs and giving reviews.. even by asking questions you are learning and teaching. Both are hard to avoid while actively participating in a forum like this...

Rllink
09-30-2016, 06:15 AM
By answering questions, giving advice, sharing videos of songs and giving reviews.. even by asking questions you are learning and teaching. Both are hard to avoid while actively participating in a forum like this...
That's not what I'm talking about really. People are stretching things here. What I'm talking about is actually teaching a student to play the ukulele. Giving lessons. Having someone ask you to take them from the ground up. Not just sharing bits and pieces of knowledge. Bits and pieces do not teach someone how to play the ukulele, it teaches them how to do those bits and pieces. Two completely different things. And I'm saying that not everyone can do that. I'm one of many of those who does not have the qualifications or the ability to teach someone else how to play the ukulele, and one of the few of those that actually realizes it.

1/2
09-30-2016, 07:51 AM
That's not what I'm talking about really. People are stretching things here. What I'm talking about is actually teaching a student to play the ukulele. Giving lessons. Having someone ask you to take them from the ground up. Not just sharing bits and pieces of knowledge. Bits and pieces do not teach someone how to play the ukulele, it teaches them how to do those bits and pieces. Two completely different things. And I'm saying that not everyone can do that. I'm one of many of those who does not have the qualifications or the ability to teach someone else how to play the ukulele, and one of the few of those that actually realizes it.


True, not everyone is able to for several reasons.
I started learning musical instruments far to late in life to Get beyond intermediate
But if someone asks me for help, I will help... I am however not the best choice for a teacher.
I would not be a good choice for a teacher, but might be a good choice for someone to learn with.

mds725
09-30-2016, 08:36 AM
I'm not having eggs for breakfast this morning, but I decided not to start a new thread about it.

Rllink
09-30-2016, 08:58 AM
I'm not having eggs for breakfast this morning, but I decided not to start a new thread about it.That's nice.

ramone
09-30-2016, 12:48 PM
I took mds725's post as another way of asking, what's the point of this thread?

:uhoh:

kohanmike
09-30-2016, 07:58 PM
I took mds725's post as another way of asking, what's the point of this thread?

Good point.

Recstar24
10-01-2016, 02:53 AM
When it comes to teaching, there are a number of mobile app development (https://www.appaustic.com/android-app-development) companies helping you out in many subjects.

These spam bots sure are getting sophisticated these days :)

bunnyf
10-01-2016, 06:47 AM
I think this is an interesting topic. Many folks who go to jams might be asked to help out on some beginning instructional level and it's interesting to hear what different experiences people have had when they are put in that situation.

Mivo
10-01-2016, 09:41 AM
It's sometimes difficult to get across to interested people that only because you are decent at doing something, you can't automatically also teach it to others. At least not in a structured, pedagogic way. Teaching is a skill of its own.

Over the years, I have had various people ask me to teach them German, but I didn't even know where to start or how to do it in any efficient, focused way, and when I honestly explained this, the reactions were sometimes along the lines of "you just don't want to do it". No, I couldn't do it, because I'm not a teacher of languages. I'm happy to converse with German learners, offer corrections and explanations to specific questions, but real teaching goes far beyond that.

I think that is the point of this thread, and I think it's a good one.

peanuts56
10-01-2016, 03:22 PM
I taught band and violin for the bulk of my 34 years in public education. Recently retired and loving it. I learned something every year I taught right to the very end. I had a very demanding band director when I was in high school and we butted heads a lot. Two stubborn Irish men! Something clicked the last half of my senior year and we got on pretty well. I am in contact with him from time to time. I wrote him when I retired to thank him for all he taught us. I also found myself channeling him from time to time over the years and told him that.
He taught by example and hard work. As hard as he worked us, he worked harder. We often teach without knowing it.

Barrytone
01-11-2019, 11:53 PM
Last year I took a job teaching beginners. After a 6 week.term of hourly lessons, 6 folks are coming along nicely. The new term has brought 6 more students. The admissions is not up to me. I am finding it difficult to incorporate the absolute beginner lessons alongside the beginner/improvers.
Do any more experienced teachers have a good fix that will keep everyone happy; new folks learning basics, tuning, simple chord etc and others eager to move forward.
Thank you

Jerryc41
01-12-2019, 02:56 AM
Not so much teaching as giving tips to newcomers.

Jim Yates
01-13-2019, 06:05 PM
I taught school for thirty some odd years. When I retired in 2001, I taught guitar, banjo and mandolin in our local music store one day a week. About ten years ago, I added ukulele to my arsenal and now have a few uke students as well. I love it and have brought some students to our local ukulele club to perform.

Here's a video of my first ukulele student, filmed by his mom. I like to have the parents of my younger students come in for the last 5 or 10 minutes of the lesson to see what we've been doing. Kyle is a teenager now.

https://www.facebook.com/marni.morton/videos/10151068630898254/