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kbkrause
10-27-2016, 02:53 AM
I'm new to the Ukulele and have larger hands so I was looking at Tenor ukulele. I took a lesson at Guitar Center and had a lot of fun to I'd like to support them with my purchase. I'm looking in the $100 range.
I'm looking at the Alvarez RU22T, but are there others I should consider or stay away from?

http://www.guitarcenter.com/Tenor--Ukuleles.gc#pageName=subcategory-page&N=19556+1083+1084+15364&Nao=0&recsPerPage=20&v=g&Ns=pLH&postalCode=48009&radius=100&profileCountryCode=US&profileCurrencyCode=USD

Thanks!

Al Davison
10-27-2016, 03:02 AM
I did a lot of searching for ukes under $200 when I got interested. If you google "best ukes under $200" you will get a lot of recommendations. Usually Kala and Ohana float to the top of those lists.

Of course, I soon lost my mind and spent a great deal more than $200. But, I still enjoy my Kala laminate concert and it's very nice to have a uke you can travel with and not have to worry so much about it.

Steve in Kent
10-27-2016, 03:29 AM
My first ukulele was a Kala KA-CEM which I still have and is great for the price, and I will use it for when I go away.

So I'd recommend the Kala KA-TEM, which has got nice wood, but the KA-T would be cheaper and probably sound the same.

http://www.theukulelesite.com/kala-ka-tem-exotic-mahogany-tenor.html

Mezcalero
10-27-2016, 04:29 AM
In that price range, you may consider buying used, through Craigslist or other source. Often you can find instruments for half of what they cost new.

kohanmike
10-27-2016, 04:39 AM
I agree that a used higher end would be something to look at, here in UU Marketplace would be a good starting place, but that Ibanez cutaway has been on my mind for quite a while.

Doc_J
10-27-2016, 05:31 AM
Go with a solid spruce top. Buying pre-owned is good way to get more for your money.

Rllink
10-27-2016, 05:41 AM
My niece bought an Alvarez Regent series concert uke this summer. I played it a little bit, and it played fine. I was looking at the Guitar Center price, and it is quite a bit less than she paid for her's. She got her's at a local store and they paid retail for it. Sadly her interest in playing the ukulele only lasted a few months, but I'm sure that it wasn't because of the ukulele.

stevejfc
10-27-2016, 06:45 AM
As several others have said.......look for pre-owned. You will most likely end up with a better instrument at a good price.

Croaky Keith
10-27-2016, 07:48 AM
Kala & Ohana are usual for first time buyers, good quality at sensible prices. :)

Mivo
10-27-2016, 07:54 AM
are there others I should consider or stay away from?

With inexpensive ukuleles, it's more a matter of where to buy from than what to buy. Unless you can fix intonation problems, action, etc. yourself, it's best to purchase from a place that performs setups. In the US, good places are TheUkuleleSite, UkeRepublic, Mim's Uke, Mainland, and in Europe: Southern Ukulele Store and Omega Music.

cml
10-27-2016, 08:15 AM
With inexpensive ukuleles, it's more a matter of where to buy from than what to buy. Unless you can fix intonation problems, action, etc. yourself, it's best to purchase from a place that performs setups. In the US, good places are TheUkuleleSite, UkeRepublic, Mim's Uke, Mainland, and in Europe: Southern Ukulele Store and Omega Music.
Fixing these things yourself is easier than it's sometimes made out to be...
But that's marketing for you ;).

Mivo
10-27-2016, 08:22 AM
It's not just marketing for me when vendors offer a setup service. I'd need to buy tools and actually mess around with a newly bought instrument that is under warranty (or can be returned within x days) when I have no background in doing that kind of thing. And also spend the time, buy replacement saddles, nuts, etc. I can circumvent that by buying from a place that includes setups, and immediately play and have fun with a new instrument as soon as I get it. The advantage of learning how to do it is that you can buy anywhere, especially cheaper ukes.

Rllink
10-27-2016, 09:27 AM
It's not just marketing for me when vendors offer a setup service. I'd need to buy tools and actually mess around with a newly bought instrument that is under warranty (or can be returned within x days) when I have no background in doing that kind of thing. And also spend the time, buy replacement saddles, nuts, etc. I can circumvent that by buying from a place that includes setups, and immediately play and have fun with a new instrument as soon as I get it. The advantage of learning how to do it is that you can buy anywhere, especially cheaper ukes.I agree. When you can buy a uke already set up, where is the benefit of doing it yourself?

Choirguy
10-27-2016, 12:10 PM
I keep bringing this up, but if you are new to Tenor and unsure if you will like it...buy a Caramel tenor ($39), live with it a while, and then move up someday--sooner than later as you only spent $39, shipped. See eBay, Amazon, or their website.

Al Davison
10-27-2016, 04:10 PM
I agree that a used higher end would be something to look at, here in UU Marketplace would be a good starting place, but that Ibanez cutaway has been on my mind for quite a while.

Yep. Even though my first reply was about buying a new uke, I will probably never buy another one new.

The important thing about buying a high-quality, pre-owned instrument is that it really doesn't cost you anything if you get a decent deal. Do your research first and find one at no more than half the retail price.
Then, whenever you want to sell it you can almost always get your money back. You get to play it for free!

actadh
10-27-2016, 04:19 PM
My first tenor was the Outdoor Ukulele at $150. I felt it was a really good value and is easier for me to play than my Mainland tenor.

Mivo
10-27-2016, 04:45 PM
I will probably never buy another one new.

If I could go back in time, I think I would also approach ukulele buying that way, though it has some downsides. It's easier if you are in the States, because you guys have a lot more choice when it comes to used higher-end ukuleles. Over here in Europe, some brands or ukes made by specific builders rarely come up, some never. The import taxes (3%) and VAT (18-25%), plus international shipping, make buying used from an overseas seller very unattractive

Other downsides are that you don't know what condition you get it in (hidden flaws), which is a more pronounced risk when you buy it from auction sites. No warranties and guarantees. Also, nearly everyone selling an instrument will describe it glamorously as one of the best instruments they ever played, but they have too many, etc. It's no doubt frequently the case, but who would say it's a dud and is too quiet/etc. If you buy new, you can usually return it (over here anyway).

But yes, I do believe that buying used is a great way to save money, twice even: when buying and when selling. The two ukes that I bought use (both on here) were great deals, and the two I sold privately, well, I think the buyer got a superb deal on those also.

jer
10-28-2016, 05:42 AM
With inexpensive ukuleles, it's more a matter of where to buy from than what to buy. Unless you can fix intonation problems, action, etc. yourself, it's best to purchase from a place that performs setups. In the US, good places are TheUkuleleSite, UkeRepublic, Mim's Uke, Mainland, and in Europe: Southern Ukulele Store and Omega Music.
I agree with this. I would add Elderly Instruments to that list for the USA.


My first tenor was the Outdoor Ukulele at $150. I felt it was a really good value and is easier for me to play than my Mainland tenor.
I'm a big fan of the Outdoor Ukuleles and would second that recommendation too.



Other downsides are that you don't know what condition you get it in (hidden flaws), which is a more pronounced risk when you buy it from auction sites. No warranties and guarantees. Also, nearly everyone selling an instrument will describe it glamorously as one of the best instruments they ever played, but they have too many, etc. It's no doubt frequently the case, but who would say it's a dud and is too quiet/etc. If you buy new, you can usually return it (over here anyway).
Another good point to consider.
Going used is great when you know what you're getting, but it can be a risk.

kbkrause
10-28-2016, 11:51 AM
Any opinions on the ISLANDER BY KANILE'A MT-4?

igorthebarbarian
10-28-2016, 12:01 PM
If you have big hands, Islander has a wider nut so that would be good. As others have mentioned, I would recommend buying from a recommended dealer who specializes in Ukes and does set-ups. It can make a world of difference as a new player.
Islanders seem to be hard to find - Hawaii Music Supply rarely has them. But Mike at Uke Republic, in Georgia, usually has some in-stock:
http://cargo.ukerepublic.com/category/islander-by-kanile-a-ukuleles
I also recommend talking to MIM's / MIM's Ukes in Virginia. She can hook you up with a good starter and it'll be fully setup.
http://stores.ebay.com/mimsukes/


Any opinions on the ISLANDER BY KANILE'A MT-4?

hal1001
10-28-2016, 02:28 PM
If you enjoyed that Guitar Center lesson (and sound like it's your first ukulele experience), then why not buy the same ukulele you played at that lesson? Nothing like trying out the actual instrument before buying it.