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Michael N.
10-27-2016, 03:55 AM
By popular demand (hard to resist the clamour of the masses): The ladder braced Tenor uke.
I've designed it so that it shows some resemblance to ladder braced 19th century guitars, which can be a bit curvy in the body. Scale length seems to suggest that mine will have 12 frets to the body joint, otherwise the bridge position moves too far north of the bracing and ends up looking like many steel string guitars. You see that kind of thing on many 14 fret tenor ukes, the bridge relatively close to the soundhole. I'm staying with 12, which is the standard for many gut/nylon strung instruments anyway. It also keeps my bracing in a similar position relative to 19 th century guitars.
I've designed a number of instruments from scratch and the scale length is the obvious starting point. The rest is just about determining body length, lower and upper bout width, width of the waist and it's position. After that it's just a matter of drawing fair curves and trying to avoid flat or awkward looking curves. Having said all that there's a fair amount of latitude in this sort of thing, as evidenced by the plethora of body shapes that you see on all sorts of instruments. I think some are a bit more graceful than others though.

Michael N.
10-27-2016, 05:16 AM
European spruce soundboard. I decided to omit the usual harmonic bar just below the soundhole, I thought it overkill considering that the diagonal bar resists the rotational force of the bridge.
The neck joint will be the same as the shallow mortice joint found on violins and romantic guitars.

95240

Michael N.
10-27-2016, 05:27 AM
Back/Sides will be of walnut. The soundboard linings are the Spanish individual block method. It kind of suits making without the use of a mould. I just dabbed spots of superglue on the juncture between the outside of the sides and the soundboard. Kind of like spot welding, just enough to keep it in shape. The lining blocks are then glued with HHG. It's a one off method, otherwise I'm much more of a fan of the outside mould in which case the lining blocks can be substituted for kerfed or solid linings - as I've used for the back.
Soundboards are normally built flat with ladder bracing, backs are domed.
This is the current state of the build. I'll get the back glued tomorrow and hopefully sometime next week I'll find time to start making the neck.

95241

95242

95243

Yankulele
10-27-2016, 07:44 AM
This is great to watch, Michael. Thanks for posting. When gluing the linings without a form, how much concern do you have for, and how do you control, keeping the sides perpendicular to the top?

Nelson

Michael N.
10-27-2016, 08:57 AM
Well you have highlighted the real problem with this method, twist or racking can be very problematic. The sides need to be bent accurately and you have to keep a very close watch on how the two bouts of the sides line up. If they are way out you are in trouble, a slight twist and you can make corrections.
To be honest I wouldn't recommend this method other than for prototypes/development models. An outer form doesn't take that long to make, it doesn't have to be the full height of the sides either. It does make things much easier and it eliminates some of the risks. Certainly if this ever became a commercial proposition the first thing that I would do is to make a mould.

greenscoe
10-27-2016, 09:06 AM
Its good to watch you put this together. How thick did you make the top? I note the grain orientation of your end blocks-mine are usually vertical. I see there's no bridge patch and I guess you'll use a classical guitar style bridge. It will certainly be interesting to find out how it sounds.

Michael N.
10-27-2016, 10:02 AM
Soundboard is 2 mm's and a little less. I vary the thickness across the width of the lower bout. Around the soundhole and towards the top block it is thicker. I don't think that area contributes much to the sound. With the upper harmonic bar, soundhole reinforcement and fretboard it's all pretty rigid there anyway.
BTW the soundboard is 3 piece or rather one wide piece and two small wings. That's not a bad idea if you are using a hand plane to thickness because you aren't fighting with the grain runout of a bookmatch. The back is one piece, again easier to thickness for the same reason.
No bridge patch. I would have used a thin standard 0.6 mm maple veneer patch if I had gone with bridge pins. I contemplated bridge pins. Really, I could have flipped a coin on which style of bridge to go for. . . there's always a chance the next one will have pins.
As for sound? Well , I'm not sure. It should work pretty well going by other larger instruments that employ ladder bracing - romantic guitars and the lute. One criticism often aimed at romantic guitars is the lack of depth to the bass. That's not an issue on a uke. It's a matter of trying it though. I like to think of it as a guess, an educated guess rather than a stab in the dark guess. Time will tell.

Matt Clara
10-27-2016, 11:26 AM
Is the kerfed lining in there a series of individual blocks, each mounted individually, or a strip cut "special" to have thinner blocks at the waist? I'm assuming the raised ones over the braces were put in manually, I'm just curious if they all were, particularly with the change up in block size at the waist.

Michael N.
10-27-2016, 11:49 AM
Every one is an individual block, each glued separately. The Spanish refer to them as tentellones or dentellones, I guess they resemble teeth.
It's a little tedious gluing them in, there certainly are faster methods. The blocks at the waist have to be smaller (narrower) because they are going around a much tighter curve. Half the block wouldn't be touching the side if you glued a wide one at the waist area. Again it's really a product of the method. The Spanish use this method with the slipper foot. Frequently they use something like an awl to position each block. Each block has a stab hole, the sign that they've used an awl to position and glue them in. Some can look a bit rough and ready. I glue them in the sequence that they are sawn off the strip of wood, others just mix them up and they can all look a little disjointed.
My preference is for solid linings top and bottom, I think they look a lot neater. They are much harder to get a good fit though, easy to get gaps with solid linings. If I was using a mould I would certainly go for solid rather than kerfed or individual blocks. Not that it makes much or any difference to the sound (as some claim). It's just a craftsman thing and I like the appearance of solid linings. Anything much above 2.5 mm thick and they can be a nightmare to bend. This is where you need friendly wood and zero short grain.

Dan Gleibitz
10-27-2016, 05:29 PM
This is great! Thanks for experimenting, and for documenting it here.

sequoia
10-27-2016, 07:43 PM
Well you have highlighted the real problem with this method, twist or racking can be very problematic. The sides need to be bent accurately and you have to keep a very close watch on how the two bouts of the sides line up. If they are way out you are in trouble.

This is great Michael! I'm looking forward to how it sounds in the end... Your quote is quite well said. Yup. Racking can be problematic. Also depends on how wet you bent the sides I've found. really wet wood wants to rack and make that annoying pocket just south of the waist. Best keep things dry. But you know what? In the end nobody notices and the uke is just fine. Just have to watch when routing in the bindings. I'm guessing there ain't no bindings on this uke.

By the way, did you say what the scale length and the length of the body was in the end? I might have missed that.

Michael N.
10-27-2016, 10:48 PM
Body length is 31 cm's, not including the back button. Scale length is 45 cm's.
Bindings? Probably none on the back but given that it's a spruce top it's a good idea to fit bindings to the soundboard otherwise over time the edges can take some heavy wear or knocks. If it was a hardwood top then there's really no need other than for reasons of appearance. Even though this is somewhat experimental I do hope to get a usable uke at the end of it all. Not only that but if the ladder bracing doesn't work then the back will be removed and I'll chisel out the bracing and replace it with a few fan braces. I've done that before on an experimental guitar. In fact after I removed the ladder bracing on it I started gluing braces on the outside of the soundboard. It looked a real mess but it was a good way of trying different ideas.

Michael N.
10-30-2016, 09:28 AM
http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g193/mignal/af15743a-3cb7-4e12-97f3-67de8b1a531b_zpsfwi8atv6.jpg (http://s56.photobucket.com/user/mignal/media/af15743a-3cb7-4e12-97f3-67de8b1a531b_zpsfwi8atv6.jpg.html)

Back is on and trimmed to the sides. A touch of refining is needed to the upper bout but that can be done if it ever makes it as a commercial proposition. As it is there's a slight flat area or rather an area where the curve looks a touch awkward. It's what development models are all about.
I've also decided that the bridge will have pins after all.
Next, on to the soundboard banding and end graft, which will be from the black 5,500 year old!!! bog oak.

sequoia
10-30-2016, 07:28 PM
I'm not seeing any awkward curves on the upper bout, but it might be the photograph. My awkward curves come just south of the waist on the lower bout where things tend to straighten out. Tends to give that pear shaped look like a women with a...a large rear if you know what I mean... Looking forward to seeing the old bog oak end graft.

Dan Gleibitz
10-30-2016, 09:56 PM
Looks great to me! I can't see any awkward or flat spots.

Michael N.
10-30-2016, 10:19 PM
Doesn't show on that photo. Top bout, around the 10 to 2 position. It's very slight, perhaps only 1 mm adding on to the template to fill it out a touch. In fact I wouldn't bother altering the template, just alter it on any future mould.
I use the bog oak a lot these days, bindings and fretboards. Ebony (especially sanding it) makes me react, fits of sneezing. It's the only wood that I know of that I've become sensitised to and even ebony I was OK with for the best part of 25 years. Things change.

Michael N.
11-01-2016, 04:29 AM
Binding and purfling on. Rosette almost done. I have a central band in the rosette that is empty. I can either go for a simple coloured band or put in some sort of braid. . . . to be decided.
There's also a couple of coats of oil varnish on the back/sides. It's not really the finish, just a method of filling the pores of the walnut. Good time to do it whilst the neck, fretboard and bridge still has to be made. Unfortunately the neck will have to wait for at least a few days whilst I attend to other builds.

http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g193/mignal/70f05ce1-c4cc-403b-ab9f-fc8ce5ba6851_zpsgt08oeqq.jpg (http://s56.photobucket.com/user/mignal/media/70f05ce1-c4cc-403b-ab9f-fc8ce5ba6851_zpsgt08oeqq.jpg.html)

sequoia
11-01-2016, 06:55 PM
Love the uke... Hate the towel. So blue. But who cares?... Looking forward to how this thing sounds. Walnut is such a great choice for sides and back.

Michael N.
11-02-2016, 12:25 AM
Excuse me. That towel had a former life, although now it's a reformed character.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p2YnBp6bsFQ

I only watched South Park when Towelie was in it, otherwise it did nothing for me.
Now he's protecting my instruments from picking up dirt, scratches and dents. Towelie really likes Walnut too but he told me to put a bit of red in the varnish to give it a slightly warmer look. I listen to Towelie all the time.

Andyk
11-02-2016, 01:14 AM
that youtube clip certainly sheds some light on the cause of the stain in the top of your picture... :)

Michael N.
11-07-2016, 04:23 AM
Afraid I'm struggling to get much work done. My ear blocked, so I bought some ear drops. I reacted to the ear drops badly, which led to an ear infection and now the anti biotics are giving me headaches. This is Kafka-esque. Still, Ukes wait for no man.
The neck/head. Not sure about the shape, may stick with it but then again I may alter it. The neck itself is of Sapele. It's denser than Honduran and consequently more difficult to work. This piece is right at the top end of Sapele's density range. Probably doubt I'll need any form of reinforcement.
Sequoia will be happy to learn that Towelie isn't feeling well too, he's retired to bed. Towelia (his girlfriend) has volunteered to step in his place.
The uke is now officially being called 'la scala uke'. I think it's Italian for scale (as in music) and I also think it means 'ladder'. Someone might correct me. Anyway, it sounds better than 'ladder uke', almost posh.
I'll fit it with wooden friction pegs. They can always be changed later. I don't have problems tuning with friction pegs though, in fact I'm convinced they help train my ear into tuning harmonically but that's another story.


http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g193/mignal/24bb442c-d404-46a3-8524-6e1646cd6fa0_zpsno3tstwf.jpg (http://s56.photobucket.com/user/mignal/media/24bb442c-d404-46a3-8524-6e1646cd6fa0_zpsno3tstwf.jpg.html).

Michael N.
11-10-2016, 06:49 AM
Neck and fretboard finished. Rosewood board. All that is left is neck fitting/gluing, the bridge to make and glue, saddle, nut. With free time at the weekend I should be able to get the strings on, perhaps late sunday or monday. Keen to hear what this ladder (scala) uke sounds like.

http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g193/mignal/ea16ca2a-af18-4ce1-a8a4-e92a49791ab5_zpsanzawvvn.jpg (http://s56.photobucket.com/user/mignal/media/ea16ca2a-af18-4ce1-a8a4-e92a49791ab5_zpsanzawvvn.jpg.html)

sequoia
11-10-2016, 06:13 PM
Keen to hear what this ladder (scala) uke sounds like.

Yeah, I'm interested in what it will sound like too. I'm trying to imagine what it might sound like and I really have no idea.

Michael N.
11-11-2016, 12:27 AM
We'll soon find out. I suspect it's hardly going to revolutionise the world. Sometimes you make big changes and nothing new seems to happen, then you make small changes and you can fix a bad wolf note or poor response. Over the years I've made a large number of different instrument types, probably much more than your average maker. Not that this makes me special, just that I've been at it for decades. I've tried all sorts of bracing patterns, wood types, sizes of instruments etc. My educated guess is that it will 'work' or that it could be made to work, even if this particular one does not. I won't be making outlandish claims of it being better than any other type of bracing though. It's not my style and I doubt very much that it will, just that it probably won't be any worse. It may be that it gives a slightly different tone. Not better, not worse, just slightly different. If everyone liked the exact same sound then I guess we would all be buying the exact same instrument with the exact same wood types etc. We don't though. That must tell us that different people like different things.

Dan Gleibitz
12-19-2016, 01:18 AM
Hi Michael, I've been wondering lately if you got la scala finished and whether you had any insights to share?

Michael N.
12-19-2016, 04:40 AM
Well it originally started off as an experimental model. As such it should have had zero decoration. That decision changed within a couple of days, so it became a bit fancier than I anticipated. Oh and I changed my mind about the bridge type too. Then I got the woodwork done and was going for a simple practical finish. That idea didn't last long, I went for a full pore fill. Then I decided for a full gloss, at least for neck, back, sides - which is my normal method for finishing instruments. That's the delay, the full gloss. That normally takes 6 to 8 weeks if you include application and waiting for the finish to fully harden. I get the strings on this week, although rubbing out the finish on the neck, back, sides will have to wait a week or so after. I should be able to play it this week though. Soon find out, matter of days.

Dan Gleibitz
12-20-2016, 02:53 AM
Well I'm glad you didn't ditch the build. I look forward to seeing (and hearing?) it.

sequoia
12-20-2016, 06:33 PM
Yeah Michael I have been looking forward to seeing the "experimental" too. Understand that pore fill takes time... I'll bet it is gonna look great.

Michael N.
12-21-2016, 12:34 AM
I have ditched instruments before, that's just part of being a maker. I had gone too far with this one though.
I'll try to get some sort of sound clip, although there's not much chance of it being a fireworks piece of music. I'll choose a slow piece that's within my capabilities. I always think that slow pieces allow you to hear the tone of the instrument a little easier. Fast pieces and there just seems to be too much going on at the same time. Besides, I can't play fast. If it sounds decent enough I'll start designing a baritone around the same concept. If it doesn't. . . . well, I tried.
Strings go on day after tomorrow.

sequoia
12-21-2016, 05:46 PM
Instead of a sound clip (they usually sound lousy if you ask me), what is more interesting is what you think about it as compared to your best uke (reference uke) in real life with no mikes or recordings. That is the only way I can tell on my ukes. How does it measure up? Oh and then we have the problems of subjectivity and bias. Bias is bad because we always want them to sound good. I'm guessing it is going to sound different. What if it sounded the same?

Michael N.
12-21-2016, 10:49 PM
Nothing is easy or as straightforward as you think. I once had two guitars in the workshop, different back/side woods, one had fan bracing the other had none. They were a similar size but a different shape, they had different types of bridges. I tried them both out for a couple of weeks and I knew which one I preferred, by a long shot. A friend happened to come by so I did a quick blind test on him, just single notes, one guitar played straight after the other. I was amazed when he said that he couldn't tell the two apart. In fact I tried him with other tests and it didn't matter what I played he thought they sounded exactly the same.
Defective hearing I thought, angrily handed him the two guitars and I turned my back. . . . . . I couldn't tell the difference either. I didn't sleep well that night.

Michael N.
12-30-2016, 04:49 AM
Just in case anyone is becoming too concerned. . . .
I've been trying this uke for a few days. I'm happy but not with the low C. It has a bit of a clunky sound, too clunky. That's probably a property of the string being a relatively thick piece of plastic. Of course I've come across the same problem many times before. I'm using nylgut but I've also tried nylon on that C. Not much better really. I'll hunt around the workshop to see if I have a pure gut in the right diameter. One type of string that I do think might work is the Aquila wound on silk, which have a completely different sound to any wound string that I've ever tried. Don't think they make them for ukes but I might be able to use one of their guitar strings providing the tension is neither too high or too low.

DownUpDave
12-30-2016, 05:57 AM
Just in case anyone is becoming too concerned. . . .
I've been trying this uke for a few days. I'm happy but not with the low C. It has a bit of a clunky sound, too clunky. That's probably a property of the string being a relatively thick piece of plastic. Of course I've come across the same problem many times before. I'm using nylgut but I've also tried nylon on that C. Not much better really. I'll hunt around the workshop to see if I have a pure gut in the right diameter. One type of string that I do think might work is the Aquila wound on silk, which have a completely different sound to any wound string that I've ever tried. Don't think they make them for ukes but I might be able to use one of their guitar strings providing the tension is neither too high or too low.


I am just curious why you did not mention florocarbon in the list of strings to try on this instrument. If it has to do with "period correct" I understand that. Another silk core steel wound C string you could try is the Thomastik CF27.

Michael N.
12-30-2016, 06:25 AM
I don't have any carbon strings but I can see how they might work better as a low C. The Thomastik I have tried although it was a few years ago, I'm not a fan. I have many different strings in stock - nylon, rectified nylon, nylgut, new nylgut, various pure gut. The reason why I think the wound silk will work is because they don't have the overly ringy nature of the usual wound nylon strings. I think the transition from plain string to a wound string will be nowhere near as obvious. I could be wrong. I'll try a number of strings out over the next few days to see which I prefer.

Oops! I keep mentioning low 'C'. Of course I mean low G. Must be because I've just started to learn piano and that confounded middle C is where it all starts.
Anyway, I'm going to try a re-entrant high G on this uke. That will work much better.

sequoia
01-01-2017, 05:31 PM
I was a little confused at first Michael. That 3rd string (C) is my big problem string, but apparently you are talking about the 4th which is usually G. You are currently using an unwound nylagut 4th? I think that is what you are saying. Absolutely try a wound 4th tuned down an octave (entrant?). That is the only way to go in my opinion but that is just the way I like the sound. Aquila sells them as single strings so there is no problem buying them. They are just wound D guitar strings (lights) cut short as far I can tell. Nothing special. As far as using real gut strings. Soooooo...19th century. I use flurocarbon because sometimes that nylagut sets my teeth on edge and I don't like the feel or look, but that is just me. One thing I am pretty sure about is that if an uke sounds like chit or mediocre, changing string types is probably not going to solve the problem.

Michael N.
01-01-2017, 11:35 PM
Yes it's the thick plain nylgut G. The rest of the strings sound fine and I've now tried a wound, much better but a bit 'ringy' for my ears. I'm pretty sure that the Aquila silk wound will be better still but it means breaking up a full set of guitar strings. This is their silk and gut set. At around 40 per set I'm reluctant. I could buy one of their Seta sets which still have the silk wound strings but synthetic trebles. They are much cheaper.
Strings are strings. I don't think they do anything special for ukuleles, just make or cut them shorter. Pure gut strings are nice, especially if you play without nails. They provide a 'grip' to the fingers that other strings don't, tactile. Unfortunately thin gut strings barely last a few days, so you are constantly changing the top string. The others can last a long time.
I've now put a re entrant G on it and that sounds perfectly good.


http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g193/mignal/a240011d-71fb-4c4f-835e-b290dd041515_zpsfw8rk0os.jpg (http://s56.photobucket.com/user/mignal/media/a240011d-71fb-4c4f-835e-b290dd041515_zpsfw8rk0os.jpg.html)

Michael N.
01-02-2017, 12:00 AM
I've used one of my signature 3 D rosettes on the Uke. The rope inlay stands proud by just over a millimetre, rounded over to give the appearance of rope. It's then doped with CA to harden the whole thing. I tried this years ago on a guitar and then promptly planed it all down and leveled it. I'd lost the courage. Lately I've decided that the idea is worth pursuing, if only to be a bit different.
I'll see if I can record a clip to give some indication as to how it sounds. I'll record it straight, no added reverb - which might be a bit brave considering everyone adds it to make them and their instruments sound good! Maybe I'll do both, straight and a touch of reverb.


http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g193/mignal/3ec12628-0f8c-4d8d-8fab-faa90e446359_zpsr7ai8pgz.jpg (http://s56.photobucket.com/user/mignal/media/3ec12628-0f8c-4d8d-8fab-faa90e446359_zpsr7ai8pgz.jpg.html)

Dan Gleibitz
01-02-2017, 01:00 AM
Well, it looks fantastic! I can't believe how much care you put into this experiment. And the rope rosette is lovely and unique.

Michael N.
01-02-2017, 01:38 AM
Well it didn't start off as being a high grade commercial style instrument. These things can seem to have a life of their own. Somewhere along the way the idea changed and I suddenly found myself putting more effort into it. It also became a present for my niece, so I really didn't see the point in wasting wood, may as well put it to good use. At least I'm now confident in the idea. In fact this very morning I've started drawing out a baritone which will use the same style of bracing. I'll leave the concert and soprano size for someone else to try.
Oh and getting that rosette to join so that the whole ring was seamless was a nightmare! I can't remember how many attempts I had at it but I was starting to lose patience. Of course I could have made it much easier by covering it with the fretboard.

Dan Gleibitz
01-02-2017, 01:59 AM
Somewhere along the way the idea changed and I suddenly found myself putting more effort into it. It also became a present for my niece, so I really didn't see the point in wasting wood, may as well put it to good use.

Aww, that's sweet. Let me know if you need a nephew or cousin or something. ;)


At least I'm now confident in the idea. In fact this very morning I've started drawing out a baritone which will use the same style of bracing. I'll leave the concert and soprano size for someone else to try.

Count me in. I've got two identical concert tops here. I could try one ladder braced and the other fan braced.... but my work is pretty rough so if there's any discernible difference in sound it could mean anything or nothing.

Did you include a bridge patch at all? A lot of ladder braced guitars seem to have a bridge patch that spans most or all of the lower bout.

Michael N.
01-02-2017, 02:10 AM
A thin standard veneer. I used 0.4 mm maple, just about covers the area of the bridge. It's really there to stop the strings from digging into the soundboard.
You could try a much bigger and heavier patch. Some ladder braced guitars had two braces, a diagonal one just ahead of the bridge and one just behind the bridge. That's on a guitar though. With ukuleles there isn't a lot of soundboard estate, so you could easily over brace things. Sometimes less is more. Of course you always have to be mindful of string pull, so it is a bit of a balancing act. Lot's of variables.

sequoia
01-02-2017, 07:39 PM
Yes it's the thick plain nylgut G. The rest of the strings sound fine and I've now tried a wound, much better but a bit 'ringy' for my ears. I'm pretty sure that the Aquila silk wound will be better still but it means breaking up a full set of guitar strings. This is their silk and gut set. At around 40 per set I'm reluctant.

I buy single wound Aquila wound low G ukulele strings from Juststrings.com. Cost is 2 dollars US. Don't know what the cost would be to the UK, but I'm always shocked at the prices you have to pay over there. Doesn't seem fair. Doesn't make sense.

http://www.juststrings.com/aqu-atslwg-1.html?cmp=nextopia&kw=aqu-atslwg-1

Michael N.
01-02-2017, 11:40 PM
That's the same for a lot of things. Still I don't really grumble about the cost of strings unless they are very specialised. You can still buy a set of strings for near $10 or $12. In the greater scheme of things plain strings can last months. I've always though that the running costs of playing a musical instrument is pretty low, especially considering the amount of time some people spend playing them. The initial cost of the instrument can be very high of course but when you spread that cost over 10 or 20 years (it should last a lifetime or two or three) it's still relatively cheap. Just think how much money some people have spent on their mobile (cell) phone over the last 15 years. They change them every one or two years, losing money on every change of phone. I know someone who cannot function without Apple - Apple phone, Apple ipad, Apple laptop. He has to have them all and they all have to be the latest model. They are just for home use, emails and a bit of surfing. He's not rich either.
I guess it's where your priorities are.

greenscoe
03-09-2017, 11:50 PM
Michael, I was interested to see you building this instrument which looked great. I was wondering what you think about the way the instrument sounds now that you've had time to try different strings and play it for a while?

I know every instrument has its own sound however its made. I'm not aware of anyone else making a ladder braced instrument in the 3 yrs I've been on the forum so an evaluation of this type of bracing would be valuable.

Michael N.
03-10-2017, 07:45 AM
It sounds pretty good but then again I would say that! But more seriously it's just as I expected. The bracing is just as capable as any other. On a guitar it changes things in a fundamental manner. Ladder braced guitars tend to be a little thicker on the soundboard, that factor plus the bracing type changes the response of the bass notes. They tend to have a little less depth, a little more woody sounding. That type of bass simply won't apply to Ukes though and probably not even to baritones. Trebles don't seem to suffer at all, in fact they seem to take on a slightly brighter, quick response. Often referred as being 'silvery' or at least that's what the lute players call it. No surprise that lutes are ladder braced too.
I no longer have the uke although it might be possible for me to get a sound clip sometime in the future. I would have done it myself but early January I started piano lessons. That has taken up virtually all of my spare playing time. In any case if you are thinking of trying a ladder braced uke you should have no fears.
I've absolutely no regrets in choosing that style of bracing for the soundboard. I've tried ladder bracing on a big modern classical a few times. I've never been satisfied with it. In fact I've abandoned ever attempting it again. But a modern classical guitar is not remotely like a ukulele. The tonal aspects and tonal expectations are very different.
This was also the first time I used the 3D rosette. . . and stayed with it. I tried it before but subsequently planed it flush. Now I've adopted it and have used it on a modern classical guitar. It has a tactile quality, players can't help but actually move their fingers over the rosette and feel it. You might call it a signature. That's beauty of trying something different. You may have many attempts, many failures but usually some little aspect makes it's way through.

greenscoe
03-10-2017, 12:06 PM
Thanks for the reply, I'll add ladder bracing to my list of things to try on a future build.