PDA

View Full Version : $95 Steel String Baritone



studemobile
10-28-2016, 07:53 AM
Here is a inexpensive way to add a steel string option. I purchased a Oscar Schmidt OGHS kids guitar. This guitar has a 1.5" nut width with a 20" scale. I reworked the nut and left the bridge pin position as is and strung up for Low G - C tuning at .024W, .018, .013, .010 and was happy with the result all in for $95 via Ebay. I then chose to have a bone nut and saddle installed. Yes this is a kids guitar but the quality is suprisingly good and the nut width made it a good candidate.
Stu

igorthebarbarian
10-28-2016, 01:07 PM
This is a pretty ingenious idea. Nice!

bunnyf
10-28-2016, 01:56 PM
How clever! I got a tenor guitar but this is a great idea. Was the nut glued, if so was it hard to remove?

studemobile
10-28-2016, 05:44 PM
I first reworked the existing (plastic) nut until I was sure the idea would work then spent the extra money to have a pro install a bone nut and saddle so I don't know what was involved.

bnolsen
10-28-2016, 06:43 PM
posted this before in another thread...its less work to make it into a slide guitar!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QBczJvwNTxk

Booli
11-09-2016, 07:08 PM
Here is a inexpensive way to add a steel string option. I purchased a Oscar Schmidt OGHS kids guitar. This guitar has a 1.5" nut width with a 20" scale. I reworked the nut and left the bridge pin position as is and strung up for Low G - C tuning at .024W, .018, .013, .010 and was happy with the result all in for $95 via Ebay. I then chose to have a bone nut and saddle installed. Yes this is a kids guitar but the quality is suprisingly good and the nut width made it a good candidate.
Stu

This is a great idea and project and one which I would like to replicate, but I would really appreciate if you could (please :)) measure (in mm) the string-to-string spacing at the saddle and report back.

These are also on Amazon for ~$100, and will ship free with Amazon Prime.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001NRVMNI

I want to get a tenor guitar, but all of the ones within my budget range (~$100) have a 30mm or (1.18") nut width, which I expect to be near impossible for my to fret comfortable (I find normal acoustic and electric guitars have strings much too close together at the nut for my comfort level, and play only 6-string classical-style guitars with a full 2" (51mm) nut width when I play a guitar).

It dont have to be fancy tonewoods nor master-luthier-grade assembly, I just want to put a set of D'Addario J66 strings on it and call it a day after modifying the nut and/or bridge to suit, and will also likely remove the 2 extra tuners and fill the holes with cuts from a dowel rod like yours.

Thanks in advance for any other info you can offer. :)

PhilUSAFRet
11-10-2016, 07:18 AM
With light strings, a new nut, and some modifications to the bridge, I'm wondering if this might make a spiffy little 6 string tuned like a uke?

Booli
11-15-2016, 01:35 AM
Just an FYI for anyone else interested, of the dozen or so web sites selling this guitar, and even on the OS web site itself, there are NO specifications for the dimensions of this instrument.

I found it for sale on Amazon, jet.com, Reverb.com, instrumentalley.com, and newegg.com (just search each for OGHS). I clicked thru the Reverb.com listing to the vendor Zorro Sounds (zorrosounds.com), and after signing up to receive their emails, got a coupon code for 10% off WELCOME10.

FINALLY when I was on NewEgg, saw the specifications, which I have copied below to save you the trouble:


Model: OGHS

Oscar Schmidt by Washburn
Handcrafted Quality
Select Spruce Top
1/2 Size dreadnought style
Catailpa sides & back
High gloss finish
Rosewood fingerboard & bridge
Mahogany neck
Fully adjustable truss rod
Color: Natural
Total length: 34.5"
Lower bout: 12.5"
Upperbout: 9"
Depth: 3.5"
Scale Length: 22"
Nut Width: 1.5"

from http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA2WZ2SF1005&cm_re=oghs-_-9SIA2WZ2SF1005-_-Product

I ordered direct from Zorro Sounds, with discount and NJ sales tax, total was $96.

My plan is to replace the nut like the OP, and string it with the D'Addario J66 tenor guitar strings and tune it CGDA in fifths as a tenor guitar. One might ask, why not just BUY a tenor guitar, well nearly ALL of them have a 30mm nut width which I expect to be mighty uncomfortable for me since I have been mostly chording on my 5ths-tuned ukes and need the space of the string spread otherwise I get hand cramps.

Nearly ALL other steel string guitars have a nut width of 1.68" or 1.75" which if you put a 4-string nut on like for an electric bass (42-43mm) the strings are oddly spaced too far apart (yes I ALREADY tried this on my dreadnought acoustic guitar) and if you use a baritone uke nut of 1.5" (38mm) it is too narrow for the neck and you have lots of space both above and below the span of the four strings (tried this too on my acoustic guitar as well).

So this AWESOME find by the OP studemobile, gives us the standard 22" tenor guitar scale, and a nice compact size body only a tiny bit larger than most baritone ukes, AND the 1.5" nut width, which to me is just perfect for 4 strings.

Additionally, now that I have the dimensions I have an idea of what case to get for it, but I will wait until I get the OGHS so I can actually MEASURE it and will report back if the dimensions listed above as per NewEgg are accurate.

Kudos to studemobile, even though he has been MIA for the past week or so from this thread, and I fully realize that I am likely just shouting into the abyss by writing this post, but just in case anyone else is looking for something like this, I figured I'd add some additional information.

I dont expect this to sound or play like the Martin TEN15, or one of the BlueRidge tenors, but I cannot afford those right now, and the cheaper Ibanez PFT2-NT or AVTN1-NT as well as the Kala tenor guitar all have the 30mm nut, and the new Pono steel string instruments made by Kilin Reece are also WAY beyond my budget.

All I want is a steel string tenor guitar, true to form in scale length and tuning, so I can learn better to play it, and to incorporate it into my songwriting.

I am NOT afraid of having to do setup work, so if it is not newbie-perfect out of the box, It does not matter, since I have setup at least a dozen of my own ukes and guitars any way and have the necessary tools.

If the J66 strings and the new nut work out, I will next look at the holes in the pin bridge and if the spacing is not to my liking, I will fill the existing holes by gluing in pieces from a dowel rod, sand them and then re-drill new holes (with the proper spacing for a tenor guitar) making this OGHS officially a 4-string instrument at both ends, as well as filling the unused tuner holes as per the OP in his photos.

So a bit of mod-work to what I hope will be a decent instrument to begin with, and I will have a smaller-bodied tenor guitar, nearly custom to my own specs, and something that currently I cannot buy from any maker at this time as per my own research.

studemobile
01-17-2017, 05:43 AM
Hi All,
Looks like my post generated some ideas. Keep me posted. BTW I think I obtained an older used version of this guitar as the body shape mimics a dreadnought and the scale length is 20" but all is well and I am enjoying it.
Stu

cml
01-17-2017, 06:35 AM
Great idea! Booli, did you get your done? Replacing the bridge altogether shouldn't be too difficult either, that way you can choose whatever string spacing you want!

Booli
01-17-2017, 04:18 PM
Great idea! Booli, did you get your done? Replacing the bridge altogether shouldn't be too difficult either, that way you can choose whatever string spacing you want!

Yes, mine's finished. Lots of thinking went into the modifications, more so than I had expected at the start, but in the end it plays like a dream and intonation is near-perfect. Maybe about 5 weeks ago it has been completed, and I played it every day save for the last week due to lack of time.

I plan to make a new thread and include a video sound sample. It is in the queue, but other projects need to be done first.

Don't worry, I will be sharing all the info and the end result, and big thanks to Stu for finding out which guitar to use as the baseline for the mod and also for the inspiration.

Seems like I wont be needing that new Pono Octave Mandolin any more, while also having saved a giant chunk of cash by instead doing the mod to the humble Oscar Schmidt guitar. :)