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sequoia
11-10-2016, 06:47 PM
Sometimes when bad things happen in the uke shop you think, "it ain't that bad. I can fix that", and sometimes you realize, this ain't good. Not good at all. Bad day all around. Was bending binding when my careful perfling delaminated really bad. That is fixable and I can makes things OK, but later I ran into my sides with the band saw cutting away waste and I'm really scrambling to fix this. The gash was about 1mm deep but against the grain. No sanding this baby out. It is scramble and fill and it is gonna show no matter what I do. All you can do is disguise. Sucks. I could feel it wasn't gonna be a good day in the shop. Should have just stopped after the binding and gone crab fishing. Probably would have got skunked.

95578

Sven
11-10-2016, 08:44 PM
Hell, that's a gash that hurts as much as a similar in the finger. If you don't want a shallow body uke maybe you should just slice those sides into bindings or linings.

sequoia
11-10-2016, 09:05 PM
No blood spilled so it doesn't really matter. In full recovery mode now. Everything is going to be fine, fine. Maybe. This is when you want to be working with dark wood like mahogany and not myrtle.

95588

mikeyb2
11-10-2016, 11:03 PM
maybe you cound make and attach one of those armrest thingies, and have it as a lefty. Just a thought.

Dan Gleibitz
11-11-2016, 12:03 AM
Ouch. Nice bounce back though.

Some days are like that, aren't they? I wish there was an app or something that would tell me when it was a bad day to go near a soldering iron. Or command line. Or fricking belt sander.

Andyk
11-11-2016, 12:58 AM
why don't you beat the living crap out of it some more and tell people you have used relicing techniques ... people pay more for that don't they? :)

(don't listen to me!!!)

Michael N.
11-11-2016, 01:34 AM
This is when it is time to reflect on your methods and see if there is a better/safer method. I can't say I've ever trimmed back on the bandsaw. Not saying it can't be done safely but it always seemed like it could go horribly wrong. Anyway, I'm always one for changing or trying out new methods, hopefully on test pieces rather than real instruments!

Chopped Liver
11-11-2016, 02:23 AM
You know what? My heart always goes out to things like this. I was born with one eye smaller than the other one. I'm actually blind in that eye. Many people look at me as if I'm not a whole person. I am. I also have been beaten up by life at times.

Let that uke sing! Must we judge everything by its appearance? Hopefully it will have its share of scratches and dings from being loved and played. It deserves the chance to sing!

If I had the money, I'd buy it!

Vespa Bob
11-11-2016, 05:08 AM
Ouch! (my first immediate reaction.) How about a really wide binding?;)

Bob

BlackBearUkes
11-11-2016, 05:26 AM
This is an opportunity to do a creative inlay.

Timbuck
11-11-2016, 05:29 AM
This is when it is time to reflect on your methods and see if there is a better/safer method. I can't say I've ever trimmed back on the bandsaw. Not saying it can't be done safely but it always seemed like it could go horribly wrong. Anyway, I'm always one for changing or trying out new methods, hopefully on test pieces rather than real instruments! I've trimmed on the bandsaw but I used a "dead mans finger" method....now I do it on the bobbin sander with a fairly course grit.

resoman
11-11-2016, 05:40 AM
Or you could make a thin line uke. I use a laminate trim router with a flush cut bit.
For me, part of becoming proficient at this craft is learning to deal with our "cockups" as Ken would say.
Yours on this uke woulda been too much for me as it'll show so it woulda been a thin line for me.

Doc_J
11-11-2016, 06:04 AM
This is an opportunity to do a creative inlay.

I agree with Duane. I'd at least add a stripe of inlay (use whatever the binding is or paua) there and do the same on the other side of the bout, and maybe do that on the upper bout too. It's a feature, not a defect.

sequoia
11-11-2016, 07:20 PM
I agree with Duane. I'd at least add a stripe of inlay (use whatever the binding is or paua) there and do the same on the other side of the bout, and maybe do that on the upper bout too. It's a feature, not a defect.

Now I never thought of that: Lightening bolt inlays on all the bouts. Channels the vibrations!

As far as trimming on the bandsaw: Yes, I always saw this as a potential disaster in the making, but with good concentration I could get away with it. How many times do we do things that we know are maybe not the best way to do things but we do them anyway. The law of averages caught up with me. The problem was I got complacent as in lost my concentration. Also lazy because I trim by hand with a thumb plane instead of a flush cut router and I don't want to plane off any more than I have too so I cut just a little too close. Lesson learned. Don't do this.... Picture below of the patch. Of course the fill is way darker than the surrounding wood. I cut about as deep as I want to on the binding channel. It basically sucks and looks horrible, but what are you gonna do? Lesson: Do not trim waste on the bandsaw. It only takes a tenth of second and you got this.

95617

kohanmike
11-11-2016, 08:36 PM
Add matching cuts all the way around and no one will ever know.

Timbuck
11-11-2016, 11:46 PM
I know what i'd do with it :2cents: But thats me.:rolleyes:
95618

Michael N.
11-12-2016, 03:09 AM
No. You can make a much better job of disguising that. The first problem is that it's going across the grain, which makes things much more difficult. If you are prepared to put in the time and to see it as a restoration job (as in a valuable old instrument) you should be able to get it virtually invisible except to those who only look very closely.
Success depends on whether you have any off cuts of the same wood. If you have then things become much easier. You need to graft in a few slithers of wood, running along the grain, matching up the grain as closely as possible.
This is the kind of idea, although with yours I'd probably do 3 long thin slithers running side by side. I wouldn't even begin to attempt it without doing a number of test pieces and even a few on scrap bent sides (or make some). It can be of great satisfaction, disguising things to a high level, it's a whole new skill set. More difficult than making. There are other techniques you can also use, like deliberately putting in a darker filler as a line running through it - so that it looks like a natural darker grain line running through, camouflage really.

Don't know if you have to register to see this but it's one I posted a few years ago. It's harder on a light coloured wood like Spruce. Yours has the problem of being much larger and on a curve, the wood is much darker though.


http://luthiersforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10117&t=33079&p=435507&hilit=soundboard+repair#p435507

Timbuck
11-12-2016, 03:15 AM
That was brill Michael...I have done similar things on flaws in rosettes using a microscope.. but that was better done than I could.

But I still like a good fire ;)

Yankulele
11-12-2016, 03:31 AM
Wow, that is really nicely done, Michael. Thanks for showing that. I feel sure I will have ample opportunity to practice that technique in the future.

Nelson

Michael N.
11-12-2016, 04:08 AM
There are a couple of things that need to be emphasised. If you have the off cut don't flip the wood. Learn to read grain direction and to match the reflection. If you haven't got the off cut you need a good stash of same type wood, then you need to go through all of it selecting the best match. Lining up the grain in the patch to the grain in the existing wood, that helps enormously. You have to fool the eye. Some even ink lines going through the patch. Then you can add colour to touch up varnish to disguise things further. It takes a lot of practice to get good at it, easy to overdo things.
One day I'll show you stuff that really will have your jaws dropping to the floor. . . . . not mine, these guys are in a completely different league. Then again if they were to 'fix' sequoia's blemish it might cost him a thousand dollars.

BlackBearUkes
11-12-2016, 08:08 AM
Besides using wood to graft over the cut, you could also use lacquer powder colors to paint over the cut. These powders come in many colors and can be mixed but it takes time and practice to get it right. All the repair color has to be done before any finish goes over it but the results can be excellent. You can also fill the cut with wood dust and CA. It has been my experience that the wood dust that matches the closest is not always the same kind of wood. In this case, you may find that pine or another color dust matches closer than the original wood. You would have to do some color samples to get a good match. I have about 20 different samples of wood dust mixed with CA on a sample board. Its a great tool if you make a living doing repairs.


Now I never thought of that: Lightening bolt inlays on all the bouts. Channels the vibrations!

As far as trimming on the bandsaw: Yes, I always saw this as a potential disaster in the making, but with good concentration I could get away with it. How many times do we do things that we know are maybe not the best way to do things but we do them anyway. The law of averages caught up with me. The problem was I got complacent as in lost my concentration. Also lazy because I trim by hand with a thumb plane instead of a flush cut router and I don't want to plane off any more than I have too so I cut just a little too close. Lesson learned. Don't do this.... Picture below of the patch. Of course the fill is way darker than the surrounding wood. I cut about as deep as I want to on the binding channel. It basically sucks and looks horrible, but what are you gonna do? Lesson: Do not trim waste on the bandsaw. It only takes a tenth of second and you got this.

95617

sequoia
11-12-2016, 06:38 PM
Success depends on whether you have any off cuts of the same wood. If you have then things become much easier. You need to graft in a few slithers of wood, running along the grain, matching up the grain as closely as possible.

Thanks Michael. This is an obvious example of a simple sawdust and glue job that is not going to work. Yes, a graft of wood would have been the way to go. That would have meant cutting a slightly larger gash and I just wasn't mentally prepared to do that. However that would have worked. I had perfect matched cut-offs. You have to make things worse sometimes before you can make them better... A thought on recovering from a screw-up: If you don't make the screw-up in the first place, you don't have to do all the work of making it right again. This can save a lot of time. I don't know how many times this thought has gone through my brain. But recovery and disguise is as much a part of luthery as making perfect dove tail joints. I'm still learning till the day when I no longer make any screw ups (or cockups as the Brits call it) and I won't need to have recovery skills... Right. Sure. Anytime now.

Timbuck
11-12-2016, 10:29 PM
The term 'cock up' originates to medieval archery. One of the three feathers on an arrow is a cock's feather usually a different colour. If the arrow was incorrectly placed on the bow for drawing and release, the arrow would go off course because of the cock's feather being up and therefore the arrow positioned wrongly on the bow. This was then known as a 'cock up'.

Michael N.
11-13-2016, 02:47 AM
Oh! I thought it referred to something else. . . . .
Anyway. Mistakes. That's a big one in the sense that it's impossible to recover from in a commercial sense. You would have to sell that at a reduced price, as a flawed instrument. Of course it won't make zilch difference to how it sounds or plays.
The mistakes never entirely go away, no matter how many you make. It's the degree of mistake that matters. If people have to use a magnifying glass to find them then I guess that you are doing alright. Ultimately you have to take a look at the instrument as a whole. Let's face it, you can come across very beautiful looking instrument with a minute flaw, you can also come across ugly instruments that are technically virtually perfect. I know which one I prefer.

saltytri
11-13-2016, 04:16 AM
Look on the bright side. Your willingness to post about a mistake has gotten a couple of our most experienced contributors to tell us about some interesting techniques.

I have a couple of instruments that "stayed home" because they were "test beds" or have cosmetic flaws that couldn't be fixed well enough to be launched out into the world. I'll wager that you or someone else will get plenty of enjoyment out of this one!