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Briangriffinukuleles
11-19-2016, 07:07 PM
I have a customer who wants me to build her a concert. We are talking about a long neck , in other words a tenor neck and scale length on a concert body. What could we expect in tone, volume and sustain differences. I would appreciate hearing of the experience of others.
Brian Griffin

sequoia
11-19-2016, 08:46 PM
I have a customer who wants me to build her a concert. We are talking about a long neck , in other words a tenor neck and scale length on a concert body. What could we expect in tone, volume and sustain differences. I would appreciate hearing of the experience of others.
Brian Griffin

My guess: A concert sound in terms of tone, volume and sustain. It is the size of the box that drives the uke not the scale length. Playability however would be more like a tenor. My question would be: Why?

Croaky Keith
11-19-2016, 10:27 PM
I have an Ohana CK35L that I'm really liking, the tenor neck allows for more finger room & gives it more sustain over a standard concert, & I think a slightly deeper tone, but still closer to a concert than a tenor. I have problems with a normal tenor body size, & this makes a great compromise for me. :)

Jim Hanks
11-20-2016, 03:36 AM
My guess: A concert sound in terms of tone, volume and sustain. It is the size of the box that drives the uke not the scale length. Playability however would be more like a tenor. My question would be: Why?

I think you just answered your own question :rolleyes:

sukie
11-20-2016, 04:38 AM
My guess: A concert sound in terms of tone, volume and sustain. It is the size of the box that drives the uke not the scale length. Playability however would be more like a tenor. My question would be: Why?

I have one. Why? More frets = more notes. I use the whole fretboard when I play.

Mezcalero
11-20-2016, 05:46 AM
I am not a builder, but I did sleep at Holiday Inn last night!

I have a Kanile'a super concert, which is what they call their concert sized body with a 17" tenor scale neck. I would say that the tone is a bit fuller/deeper than standard concert, especially in the bass and low mid frequencies.

I have seen some builders doing 16" scale which splits the difference. Sound sample and details of one can be heard/seen here:http://www.theukulelesite.com/ono-custom-mango-16-scale-concert.html

It could be useful to compare sound sample of like models, such as these two where all things are equal except the length of the neck:
regular concert - http://www.theukulelesite.com/kanilea-k-1-c-302.html
long neck concert - http://www.theukulelesite.com/kanile-a-super-concert-k-1-sc-15532.html

Masonguitars
11-22-2016, 12:57 PM
I've made three long-neck concerts and they are something quite special. Yes, the concert body contributes a character to the basic tone, but having a longer scale (I make mine 17") adds more resonance and sustain. Overall, I have have found that they have a bit more sparkle. This longer scale also changes the bridge placement which influences the sound. I intend to keep building long-neck concerts.

southcoastukes
11-22-2016, 05:53 PM
Hello Brian! Jump right in on this - you won't be sorry.

We've built a bunch of these and love them. You have a longer scale, so you have more fretboard. If you like to play up the neck obviously this is a plus. Then, as long as you don't have a heavily braced instrument, you can go to a bit lighter gauge stringing. If you keep the same tuning, then the longer scale lets you keep the same tension with lighter gauges, that you would have had with heavier strings on a short-neck model. But - - the lighter gauges give more clarity and projection when you play up high.

The increased sustain Mason spoke of is also a plus. We keep the bridge in the sweet spot, but then again, ours were designed as longnecks to begin with (we've never made the short-neck Concerts). We look at these as high performance instruments for those who want a lot of fretboard and plan to make use of it. If your customer wants a modern standard tuning, reentrant is best - linear probably only if she plays solo and can tune up a step.

On the other hand, if your customer is basically a first position strummer, then really, the short-necks are probably best. In reentrant C tuning, the standard Concert is as good as it gets for this sort of playing. The slightly heavier strings will give a bit more volume, slightly less sustain doesn't make much difference for 1st position strumming, and the fall-off in clarity the heavier strings will have going up the neck won't make any difference if you don't play up there.

Hope that helps!

Briangriffinukuleles
11-22-2016, 08:03 PM
Thanks everyone for your excellent and thoughtful answers. I will show your responses to my customer and let her make the decision, but I am hoping she opts for the long neck, she is an advanced player and is playing barred chords up the neck. I would enjoy the experience.
Great to have all of your experience to draw on. And especially your string knowledge Dirk.

southcoastukes
11-23-2016, 06:06 AM
... I am hoping she opts for the long neck, she is an advanced player and is playing barred chords up the neck. I would enjoy the experience...

Show here this: Victoria on her "Long-neck Concert". Should seal the deal.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ZKCgPDtHkk

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
11-23-2016, 06:36 AM
A longer scale doesn't give you "more fretboard" 19 frets is 19 frets.

A longer scale give you more tension though, which drives the top with more energy. This may or may not contribute to "more" of everything else, but probably not as you have to brace accordingly.

Usually, women want a smaller body shape due to their boobs, which get in the way, so i'm told by female players.

Another solution to "the boob problem" is a "Manzer wedge" on a tenor body- google it

southcoastukes
11-23-2016, 07:27 AM
A longer scale doesn't give you "more fretboard" 19 frets is 19 frets.


Would have more than a standard Concert @ 17 frets?!?


A longer scale give you more tension though, which drives the top with more energy. This may or may not contribute to "more" of everything else, but probably not as you have to brace accordingly.


It does only if you choose to use the same strings. That is another option, a lot of folks go that way too, but it's not the situation I was talking about.


a "Manzer wedge"

These are pretty comfortable for almost everyone on larger instruments.

Croaky Keith
11-23-2016, 09:08 AM
Re strings, I use Living Water Concert Low G flourocarbons on my tenor scale concert, & on my tenor scale soprano, they give less tension, which I like. :)

Booksniffer
11-23-2016, 09:29 AM
Maestro also make some wonderful long-necked concerts!
Their regular concerts, on the other hand, have a rather short neck.

saltytri
11-23-2016, 09:33 AM
Dirk is too much of a gentleman to toot his own horn but perhaps he will forgive me for being a little more explicit. One of the very useful features of the Southcoast Strings web site is the tension charts. Coupled with the unusually wide range of strings that he offers, the charts enable us to pick string sets that are a good match for pretty much any scale length and any desired tension. For instance, for a 17" linear C tenor, the chart tells us that ML-WB will yield medium tension. Keep everything the same except make it an 18" and the tension would go up. If the goal is to keep tension about the same on the 18" as on the 17", the charts tell us to use LML-WB. This takes a bit of interpolation but that is easily done with the charts.

Recstar24
11-23-2016, 09:34 AM
A longer scale doesn't give you "more fretboard" 19 frets is 19 frets.

A longer scale give you more tension though, which drives the top with more energy. This may or may not contribute to "more" of everything else, but probably not as you have to brace accordingly.

Usually, women want a smaller body shape due to their boobs, which get in the way, so i'm told by female players.

Another solution to "the boob problem" is a "Manzer wedge" on a tenor body- google it

My current acoustic has a manzer wedge - can't say I notice any extra comfort from a boob perspective as a male, lol.

Michael Smith
11-23-2016, 03:10 PM
That should be refered to as a small bodied tenor if it has a 17 inch scale. I have been making some 16 inch scale concerts that I like very much. They are a little more poppy than a tenor with a little less string tension which I like. They also play nicely for a larger hand like mine, way bigger than Trump's.

southcoastukes
11-25-2016, 06:23 AM
That should be refered to as a small bodied tenor if it has a 17 inch scale...

Hello Michael,

I'm familiar with a convention that an instrument is identified by it's scale, but with Ukulele it's not the custom, and personally I think the Ukulele convention is a better way to go.

Joe Souza was the first I know of to offer this sort of thing - he called them Longneck Concerts, though there had been some Longneck (15") Sopranos produced prior to that. But in addition to the history I just think it makes more sense.

A 17" scale on a Concert body will sound different than the standard scale, but it still sounds much more like its shortneck little brother than it does its big Tenor-bodied relative. Or to put it another way, between body and scale name, the body name, at least in this situation, best describes the sort of sound you'll hear.

Croaky Keith
11-25-2016, 09:43 AM
I used to think as Michael, but realised that the sound/tone is that of the body rather than the scale; & this is what we use.

There are long neck sopranos with both concert & tenor necks, & this made me decide that we have it right. ;)

I like the size of a soprano body, & have a couple, but I also have concert & tenor scale sopranos too, which give more finger room & more sustain; as does my tenor scale concert. :)

Edit: "Variety is the spice of life."

Briangriffinukuleles
11-29-2016, 07:27 PM
Well, wouldn't you know, After all of that, today the lady decided not to have me build her a regular bodied concert with either a regular or a long neck. She has opted for one of my concert "Pinecone" ukes, Thin with a comfortable curved maple back. I think the "boob issue" won out. Or maybe because I am finishing a trio of them just now and she will have one by Christmas. I have orders for four tenors now, so my long necked concert project will wait for another day. Thanks all for your good advice however.
Brian

Jim Hanks
11-30-2016, 03:41 AM
Just sneak a tenor neck on the Pinecone. See if she even notices. :p

Patrick Madsen
11-30-2016, 10:04 AM
I get Brian's first longneck Pinecone Jim lol. I'll never have enough Griffin ukes.