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_Silly_Me_Sitting_Here_
01-01-2017, 11:39 AM
So... One last question before I submit my order for a.... wait for it.... Kala solid mahogany baritone uke (KA-SMHB)!

I'm trying to envision how I might wear my big, comfy guitar strap w/ my bari. Do I install a strap button at the heel of the neck? (I'll hook the other side to the Misi Trio I'm having installed at the tail block.) Or, do I tie the other end of the strap up between the tuners? Is there a pro/con to either of these two methods?

Anyways.... I'd love to know how you guys are wearing your ukulele straps & why you've decided that method works best for you. (P.S. Photos would be grrrrreat!)

:)

kypfer
01-01-2017, 11:59 AM
From someone who only uses a big comfy guitar strap on a big comfy guitar ... the length of 1/4" decorative cord I use on my baritone runs from the button on the base of the instrument to the headstock ... FWIF the big comfy guitar strap on my J200 look-a-like runs to the heel of the neck, but on my similar-size 12-string it runs to the machine heads. On the big guitars I find either option OK, on smaller instruments (including smaller guitars) I find the heel of the neck fastening to be unbalanced ... sufficiently so to affect my playing!

I'd suggest trying tying to the headstock first to see if you like it, then resorting to drilling holes in your new instrument if you feel it would be better, rather than doing it the other way around.

As is often the case, YMMV ;)

Mivo
01-01-2017, 12:11 PM
My only instrument that has two strap pins is my parlor guitar, so it's bigger than a baritone, and I feel this is the best way of using a strap. I have a soprano with only one strap button (the other end is tied to the headstock) and this works also (or would, if I used a strap with the small ukes), but if you already get one pin fitted, you may as well get one at the heel also. Even if you end up using only the one at the base, it'll be good to have the option, especially if you have HMS install them.

Are you sure about the Kala?

DownUpDave
01-01-2017, 12:15 PM
First off great choice of baritone. That Kala all solid mahogany is a WINNER. SoloRule owns one and I am always impressed when I play it. Spend the extra money and get the LR Baggs 5.0 pick up. I have a Pono baritone with the Misi and a Kamaka baritone with the Baggs. The Baggs reproduces a more natural sound. I have a Baggs 5.0 in 5 tenors as well, best uke pick up I have heard for reproducing as natural a sound as possible. The Misi sounds a bit glassy. Others might disagree.

I have a button installed on the heel of the neck of every uke I own. This gives you the option of using it this way or tying it to the headstock

_Silly_Me_Sitting_Here_
01-01-2017, 12:50 PM
Are you sure about the Kala?


Haha... I *think* so.... lol..... But, after several back & forth's with Corey at HMS, I'm pretty much convinced that the Kala will be easier for me to play than the Pono. (I wish I could confirm that by actually playing one in person. But, of course, that's not an option without a plane ticket!) So, for now, I'm going with the Kala. :)

vcs700s
01-01-2017, 01:01 PM
Haha... I *think* so.... lol..... But, after several back & forth's with Corey at HMS, I'm pretty much convinced that the Kala will be easier for me to play than the Pono. (I wish I could confirm that by actually playing one in person. But, of course, that's not an option without a plane ticket!) So, for now, I'm going with the Kala. :)

Great choice. Have HMS mount the strap pin on the heel. You will be glad you did.

zztush
01-01-2017, 01:03 PM
I prefer A to B. Because my friend's soprano tips over (red arrow) by heel end pin on B.

https://s24.postimg.org/yumz7shgl/4862979.png (https://postimg.org/image/hhcosxm5d/)imgurl (https://postimage.org/)

_Silly_Me_Sitting_Here_
01-01-2017, 01:23 PM
Great graphic, @zztush!

I'm more worried about the ukulele's neck/ headstock tipping with the baritone size. I'm thinking "A" looks more comfortable than "B," too. But, doesn't that strap get in the way w/ chording and whatnot?

Jim Hanks
01-01-2017, 01:27 PM
I'm in the camp of tying to the headstock, especially for tenor and smaller, usually baritone too. Since you're unsure, I'm with Vic that you should have HMS install the heel pin. If you don't need it, you're out, what, $5? If you do need it and don't have it, it's probably going to be more than $5 to have someone local do it and more of a hassle.

actadh
01-01-2017, 01:39 PM
I play sitting down and have a hard time holding a soprano. Nearly all my sopranos have the "B" strap pins as in zztush's diagram. I use a 2" cotton Franklin brand guitar strap. The ones that don't have a strap are either vintage and I am afraid to install them (the Harmony and Silvertone), or there is no real way to add strap buttons (Zither Heavens and First Act).

The Luna concert has a delicate fancy soundhole and I am afraid the inlay will snap off if I have a lower bout pin installed. But, it works well played with my left foot elevated when seated.

The OU tenor - I find that it does well with a rubbery rug underlay between me and the back of that polycarbonate uke back (no worries about the finish), or else I elevate it like the concert. No strap pins on it.

The Mainland tenor was bought used and had one strap button on the lower bout. I got a fancy 2" nylon strap and tied the other end to the headstock. That gives me enough control to fret. Nylon seems to do ok with the bigger ukulele, but I need the grip of cotton on my clothes with the lighter sopranos.

I wear my straps over the left shoulder (I fret with my left hand) diagonally down to my lower right to fit on the lower bout pin. I have seen some wear it over the strumming hand shoulder which in my case would be the right side (mando style?), and might try it if I had narrower straps.

zztush
01-01-2017, 02:18 PM
Great graphic, @zztush!

I'm more worried about the ukulele's neck/ headstock tipping with the baritone size. I'm thinking "A" looks more comfortable than "B," too. But, doesn't that strap get in the way w/ chording and whatnot?

I have no problem with A (in my diagram) in terms of chording on my soprano and tenor. But I don't doubt that some one may have a trouble with it.



I wear my straps over the left shoulder (I fret with my left hand) diagonally down to my lower right to fit on the lower bout pin. I have seen some wear it over the strumming hand shoulder which in my case would be the right side (mando style?), and might try it if I had narrower straps.


As stated by sctadh, A is left shoulder type (though he is lefty, he put it on his right shoulder), B is right shoulder type. A is Albert King and B is Freddie King. Freddie King always played this B style. C is B.B. King. They are called three Kings in Blues and my strap teachers.

https://s29.postimg.org/ah3rt505j/combine_images.png (https://postimg.org/image/y835b90cj/)free upload pictures (https://postimage.org/)

SoloRule
01-01-2017, 03:12 PM
First off great choice of baritone. That Kala all solid mahogany is a WINNER. SoloRule owns one and I am always impressed when I play it. Spend the extra money and get the LR Baggs 5.0 pick up. I have a Pono baritone with the Misi and a Kamaka baritone with the Baggs. The Baggs reproduces a more natural sound. I have a Baggs 5.0 in 5 tenors as well, best uke pick up I have heard for reproducing as natural a sound as possible. The Misi sounds a bit glassy. Others might disagree.

I have a button installed on the heel of the neck of every uke I own. This gives you the option of using it this way or tying it to the headstock

Thinking of selling the kala baritone to get ready for a kamaka when my seller decided to sell.

Dan Gleibitz
01-01-2017, 03:15 PM
You missed option D, zztush:
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/files/img/cl/outsidelands/2014/day3/20.jpg

_Silly_Me_Sitting_Here_
01-01-2017, 03:25 PM
You missed option D, zztush:
http://www.brooklynvegan.com/files/img/cl/outsidelands/2014/day3/20.jpg

OUCH! That can't be fun.

crisson
01-01-2017, 03:35 PM
I had HMS put a heel button on my Kala tenor but I don't use it. I prefer to tie off to the headstock (diagram A). I haven't had any problems with chording with this method. I agree with some of the earlier posters though...for an extra $5 it is worth the option.

zztush
01-01-2017, 03:48 PM
Yes, it is very true option D. Thanks Dan.

Normally we hold acoustic instruments angle of 45 degree to our body in order to use back board sound (top figure). Hence not many uku players or acoustic blues guitarists play like D (bottom figure). This photo shows very good exceptions. Solid guitar and female player who keep her guitar under her breast. I wanna be her guitar. :)

https://s24.postimg.org/qhomz18yd/4864549.png (https://postimg.org/image/9tx4wje6p/)post a picture (https://postimage.org/)

besley
01-01-2017, 04:58 PM
I might be able to get away with style "A" (tied to the headstock) with a uke, but I've never been able to get that to work on a guitar. For that I'll need bigger shoulders or bigger shoulder pads.

_Silly_Me_Sitting_Here_
01-01-2017, 05:21 PM
I had HMS put a heel button on my Kala tenor but I don't use it. I prefer to tie off to the headstock (diagram A). I haven't had any problems with chording with this method. I agree with some of the earlier posters though...for an extra $5 it is worth the option.

Yeah... I'll probably get the button. I mean, it's only $5. But..... I'm wondering.... Does anyone actually *use* that heel button? It sounds like most folks are leaning towards the tied headstock positioning.

Down Up Dick
01-01-2017, 07:57 PM
Yeah... I'll probably get the button. I mean, it's only $5. But..... I'm wondering.... Does anyone actually *use* that heel button? It sounds like most folks are leaning towards the tied headstock positioning.

Yeah, I use a heel button on my Kala Baritone, but I don't use straps on my smaller Ukes. However, I do use a homemade, paracord Uke leash on my eighter, but it may be temporary. I'm thinking of having a button put on and maybe two.

I usually play seated, and I mostly just strum my smaller Ukes. :old:

kohanmike
01-01-2017, 08:14 PM
I always use strap buttons at the base of the neck and at the heel, and I don't find my ukes or bass ukes to flop forward like the example. Actually, the only time I did experience that was when the strap button was on the back at the bottom of the neck, I moved it onto the base of the neck. I sling it over my neck so it is behind my right arm and in front of my left arm like traditional guitar straps.

http://www.kohanmike.com/uploads/Strap buttons.jpg

Dan Gleibitz
01-01-2017, 08:17 PM
Yeah... I'll probably get the button. I mean, it's only $5. But..... I'm wondering.... Does anyone actually *use* that heel button? It sounds like most folks are leaning towards the tied headstock positioning.

I use a the heel button on my tenor.

Picker Jon
01-01-2017, 09:31 PM
I usually stick a button on the heel and one on the end block and attach a soft cotton strap. Very comfortable and stable.
http://i67.tinypic.com/2lcxthv.jpg

http://i68.tinypic.com/op8l6c.jpg

http://i66.tinypic.com/2k30wx.jpg

Croaky Keith
01-02-2017, 12:31 AM
But..... I'm wondering.... Does anyone actually *use* that heel button?

I do if I use a strap, that is where mine goes, lanyard style, both ends attach there, with a loop around my neck. :)

hollisdwyer
01-02-2017, 01:32 AM
All but one of my instruments have pickups so one end of the strap goes there. I prefer the other end to attach somewhere on the heel. Here's a photo of my Barron River tenor 8 string. Because of the heel shape Allen installed the strap button in the 'meatiest' part of the heel. Other of my Ukes, with different heel shapes, have it on the underside. All of these placements work well for me.

96661

Tim Mullins
01-02-2017, 06:53 AM
For those who don't want to drill their ukulele -- or find that attaching a strap to the peghead interferes with their left hand and find that a button on the heel leads to "neck drop" -- my Mobius Strap solves both those problems. It actually depends on the weight of the neck to hold it in hands-free playing position. You can check it out at http://www.mobiusstrap.com.

Ukejenny
01-02-2017, 10:00 AM
I have an endpin pickup and I tie off on the neck - I kind of have a special way I like to tie it off.

Booli
01-02-2017, 11:17 AM
just throw it over your shoulder, you know, like a 'continental' soldier :)

do YOUR ears hang low? :cool:

besley
01-02-2017, 11:59 AM
One thing that I hadn't appreciated when I first went looking for straps for my ukes was how important friction can be. With my guitars I just always used a big leather strap that was typically suede on the underside, so they always did a great job of preventing neck dive when I let go of the guitar. But the first strap or two I found that were narrow enough for ukes (~ 1 1/2" wide or narrower) turned out to be pretty slippery material. I thought this narrow one by Levy would be great, but it is super slick.

https://reverb-res.cloudinary.com/image/upload/s--gDjqqZLT--/a_exif,c_limit,e_unsharp_mask:80,f_auto,fl_progres sive,g_south,h_620,q_90,w_620/v1454644108/imlfultp5xj4ydb2b72z.jpg

I then went looking for something in suede leather, but there's not much available under 2" in width. So for the time being the best I've found is a cotton strap, much like the one Picker Jon showed us above.

http://i66.tinypic.com/2k30wx.jpg

These can be found around 1 1/2" in width, and do a great job of sticking to your shirt well enough to keep the uke from sliding neck down the moment you reach for something. Kala sells a nice one that can be used in either our A or B configuration.

http://www.elderly.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/k/c/kcstp2.jpg

Picker Jon
01-02-2017, 08:19 PM
One thing that I hadn't appreciated when I first went looking for straps for my ukes was how important friction can be.

http://i66.tinypic.com/2k30wx.jpg[/imlKala sells a nice one that can be used in either our A or B configuration.

[img]http://www.elderly.com/media/catalog/product/cache/1/image/9df78eab33525d08d6e5fb8d27136e95/k/c/kcstp2.jpg

That's exactly why I use these cotton straps. I was wondering whether to edit my post to make that point so you've saved me a job! I use these on my acoustic guitars and ukes and they give me a lot of confidence that the instrument isn't going to budge when I don't want it to. I too have a beautiful, patterned but slippery (and expensive) strap gathering dust in a drawer somewhere.

I haven't seen the Kala straps before, they look just the job, I'll look out for them.

wickedwahine11
01-03-2017, 01:40 AM
Yeah... I'll probably get the button. I mean, it's only $5. But..... I'm wondering.... Does anyone actually *use* that heel button? It sounds like most folks are leaning towards the tied headstock positioning.

I think the heel button is a great option, and for $5 you should definitely opt for it. I use straps on my ukes and am grateful to have the two button system, it is a lot more secure (to me anyway). I have buttons here on the neck on my ukes.

96680

sukie
01-03-2017, 03:23 AM
I had HMS put a heel button on my Kala tenor but I don't use it. I prefer to tie off to the headstock (diagram A). I haven't had any problems with chording with this method. I agree with some of the earlier posters though...for an extra $5 it is worth the option.
I tried tying it to the headstock but I found it got in the way. So I had a pin installed on the heel. Much better for me!

Elessar
01-03-2017, 09:52 AM
Uh,...who'd a thunk it? Apparently, not many takers on here to try your idea by the lack of comments. I have to admit, it seems very novel and I like the idea. I'll have to think on that...hummm...I have to wonder if, as a new player, that I am frequently turning my instrument so that I can see the fret board and wonder if this practice would cause the strap to pull against the strings and the saddle/nut?


For those who don't want to drill their ukulele -- or find that attaching a strap to the peghead interferes with their left hand and find that a button on the heel leads to "neck drop" -- my Mobius Strap solves both those problems. It actually depends on the weight of the neck to hold it in hands-free playing position. You can check it out at http://www.mobiusstrap.com.

Tootler
01-03-2017, 10:56 AM
Another for attaching to the headstock. For all sizes from soprano to baritone.

I attach the strap between the tuners rather than behind the nut. I find that attaching to the headstock just behind the nut gets in the way of chording. Moving to between the tuners avoids that. I make my own headstock straps with a button on and use 1" straps for concert and tenor and 1.5" strap for baritone. For sopranos I use a uke leash with a strap button adapter.

I get my straps off a trader on ebay who does nice ones with music images on.

Elessar
01-03-2017, 03:17 PM
Ever since my early days of guitar I've been worried about hanging the instrument from the neck by a strap fixed near the tuning keys. Always seemed like it would be a bad idea for the overall health of the next/fretboard. I guess thousands of musicians have done it this way for so long that it doesn't hurt them, but I've always wondered...

Mivo
01-03-2017, 03:22 PM
Ever since my early days of guitar I've been worried about hanging the instrument from the neck by a strap fixed near the tuning keys. Always seemed like it would be a bad idea for the overall health of the next/fretboard. I guess thousands of musicians have done it this way for so long that it doesn't hurt them, but I've always wondered...

I, too, have been wondering about whether it puts additional strain on the neck and the joint.

_Silly_Me_Sitting_Here_
01-03-2017, 04:39 PM
Putting the strap button on the heel often has an impact on how the instrument fits into the case.

I never thought of that.. I'll be sure to ask my seller before drilling begins. Thanks for the "heads up!"

Rllink
01-04-2017, 03:26 AM
Ever since my early days of guitar I've been worried about hanging the instrument from the neck by a strap fixed near the tuning keys. Always seemed like it would be a bad idea for the overall health of the next/fretboard. I guess thousands of musicians have done it this way for so long that it doesn't hurt them, but I've always wondered...That's what I figure. But seriously, the neck is made to be supported, if not by a strap, then by your hand. Not to mention picking it up, putting it down, carrying it, and waving to your friends with it in your hand. I've found ukuleles to be quite rugged actually. At least the ones that I have owed or handled. That said, I'm quite sure that there are people who go the great lengths not to put any pressure what so ever on the neck of their ukuleles. I guess that is fine, but I don't worry about it.

But for me at least, the strap is not an integral part of my playing, it is just a helper that I use sometimes if I need the support. It isn't like I need a strap or I can't play my ukulele. Most of the time I don't even use one. For that reason I don't install a lot of hardware just to put a strap on it once in a while. But not to minimize Tims strap in any way, because he has some nice features that a piece of twine does not, but I was wrapping a cord around the body of my uke like that before I got a ukulele with a pickup and a strap button as a part of it, and that worked as well. I still do that with my old Makala if I feel the need. If I didn't have a strap button on the MiSi in my Mainland, and if I wanted something a little nicer than a piece of cord, I would go with Tim's Mobius strap. Just saying, you can't get much simpler to use.

A side note, speaking of the ruggedness of a ukulele, I can't find it right now, but I will post it when I do, there is a video out there of Tiny Tim performing at a music festival, and someone throws a beer can at him while he is on stage. He takes his ukulele like a ball bat in both hands, smacks the beer can right back at the guy, then starts playing again, and singing right through the whole thing and not missing a note. Great video.

Joyful Uke
01-04-2017, 06:53 AM
just throw it over your shoulder, you know, like a 'continental' soldier :)

do YOUR ears hang low? :cool:

I've had this song stuck in my head since reading this. LOL.

My preferred strap, though, is strap button on one end, and tied to the headstock between the tuners at the other end.
I've tried various straps, and keep coming back to the uke leash, even with the strap button.

Tim Mullins
01-04-2017, 07:05 AM
Uh,...who'd a thunk it? Apparently, not many takers on here to try your idea by the lack of comments. I have to admit, it seems very novel and I like the idea. I'll have to think on that...hummm...I have to wonder if, as a new player, that I am frequently turning my instrument so that I can see the fret board and wonder if this practice would cause the strap to pull against the strings and the saddle/nut?

Hi Elessar,

When playing standing up the weight of the ukulele keeps the strap taut and away from the strings. I just tried it and you have to tilt it out almost horizontally to get it to touch them. When playing sitting down it is possible to take the weight off the strap so that it bellies out under the strings and can touch them, but it is not a problem if adjusted properly and once you are familiar with its use. And they come with a money-back satisfaction guarantee! Thanks for your interest and comment!

Best,

Tim

Booli
01-04-2017, 07:12 AM
I've had this song stuck in my head since reading this. LOL.

My preferred strap, though, is strap button on one end, and tied to the headstock between the tuners at the other end.
I've tried various straps, and keep coming back to the uke leash, even with the strap button.

Glad to supply the earworm :)

On all my ukes I use either a length of paracord or 54cm or 72cm round bootlace (sold in pairs for $2), one end tied to an endpin and the other end tied to the headstock by the nut. My Flea ukes have a loop at the neck heel which I've just started using and find it works well. My Fluke ukes have the zip-tie mounting square fixed to the back, and the same bootlace is tied to the square as well as the headstock. There was a whole thread about this a while back (which is linked in the first post here (http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?93637-The-Magic-Fluke-Company-Appreciation-thread))

Most ukes (even baritones) weigh less than 3 lbs, so a wider strap than a bootlace feels like overkill to me and is bothersome on my body. I have no trouble keeping the neck up with a simple bootlace, whether sitting or standing. The bread-basket usually helps by providing a nice 'shelf' as well, especially when leaning back in a chair or on the couch....ymmv

also, spending $$$ for something like a Lakota Leathers strap feels like a real waste of my limited funds...

If I did not have the bootlace option, I'd use a few of Lori's UkeLeash straps, and have the connectors for the headstock and endpin on each uke and rotate a few actual UkeLeash straps among them, but with more than a dozen ukes this would get expensive, so I've opted for something more frugal and simple.

keod
01-04-2017, 07:37 AM
I've put strap buttons on the tail of all my ukes and would then just tie to the headstock. It worked well but I did find with the normal 2 in wide straps that it could interfere with fretting. Then DownUpDave graciously installed a elliptical button on the heel of a uke (on the underside) that he sold me and gifted me a narrower 1 1/2 in Sherrins Thread strap - and it was great! I later then bought the very narrow 1/2 inch Levy Leathers strap shown in an earlier post (http://www.levysleathers.com/shop/henderson-series-classical-ukulele-strap-mj19uke-003/ ) and found it was the best - both tied to the headstock and the heel button. If/when I ever buy another uke I will always elect to have both buttons installed....and likely will install heel buttons on the all the rest, just for the convenience and choice- although on tenor ukes I prefer the headstock tie off to provide a little more stability to the heavier necks.

besley
01-04-2017, 07:56 AM
Ever since my early days of guitar I've been worried about hanging the instrument from the neck by a strap fixed near the tuning keys. Always seemed like it would be a bad idea for the overall health of the next/fretboard. I guess thousands of musicians have done it this way for so long that it doesn't hurt them, but I've always wondered...

There are at least a couple of guitar technicians on YouTube who had said that they do see evidence of guitar necks being weakened or stressed by folks who use straps attached to the headstock. Given its much shorter neck I'd be surprised if that is ever a concern for a uke.

Elessar
01-04-2017, 08:08 AM
Well, my concern is based on the way people hang over the side of their guitar like it was the tailgate of a pickup truck. I've watched musicians perch themselves on the support of the strap and put what would appear to be quite a bit of force on the strap while they "talk story" with friends or audience members. I understand that many of these people are resting on a larger instrument, or in some cases, a fiberglass electric guitar. However, I just wonder if the instrument is not supported from the bottom, as in resting on your lap or thigh, and you're hanging on the neck/bottom pin, when considering the light weight materials used in construction of a ukulele, if that would cause harm. Not meaning to hijack this thread, but gotta' wonder...


There are at least a couple of guitar technicians on YouTube who had said that they do see evidence of guitar necks being weakened or stressed by folks who use straps attached to the headstock. Given its much shorter neck I'd be surprised if that is ever a concern for a uke.