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View Full Version : How to pronounce the name Aquila?



mimmo
01-17-2017, 09:04 PM
Hi guys,
a lot of people want to know how to say Aquila.
Aquila in italian mean Eagle
here is:

https://soundcloud.com/user-536545389/how-to-say-aquila

take care

Mimmo :D

Booli
01-17-2017, 09:10 PM
Thanks Mimmo!

Since I am sure many folks have this question, maybe the moderators can make this a sticky-post?


FYI: In case some folks do not know, the OP Mimmo, as in Mimmo Peruffo, is the Founder, CEO and Lead Engineer of Aquila Strings from Italy, and it is HIS OWN VOICE that is in the Soundcloud recording in the first post of this thread.

So please have no doubt as to the authoritative pronunciation from the man himself, who also is a native Italian speaker.

This is an small excerpt taken directly from the Aquila web site:


"Mimmo was born at Arborea, in Sardinia isle. Chemical, pupil of the stringmaker Arturo Granata of Melzo (Milan) and researcher in Caldogno, a village near Vicenza (where he founded the Aquila Corde Armoniche S.a.s) devotes himself, since the 1983 year, to the study and re-creation of gut strings in use in the Renaissance, Baroque and Classic eras. In the field of research on modern materials, in 1997 he discovered and brought onto the market Nylgut, a true “synthetic gut” to substitute for nylon on historical plucked instruments and on classical guitar, ukulele, ouds, charangos etc. His works have appeared in ‘Recercare’, ‘F.O.M.R.H.I quarterly’, ‘The Italian Lute Society Bulletin’, ‘Orfeo’, ‘The Lute Society of America Bulletin’, ‘Quattrocentoquindici’, ‘Il Fronimo’, in the volume ‘Gendai Guitar’, ‘Das Musikinstrument’ etc. He took care of the gut string- section in the musical instruments catalogue of the GNM in Nürnberg and the volume on the Bergamo 1998 exhibition “Evaristo Baschenis and still life painting in Europe”. He was the first to carry out an accurate research on the gut strings pieces from the first half of the 18th century in the Museo Stradivariano in Cremona and , in April 2000, the gauging of the original violin gut strings which belonged to Nicolò Paganini. He has been reading papers in the conservatories and universities in Vienna, Dresden, Milan, Venice, London, Brussells, Florence, Brescia, The Hague, Gijon, etc. When he have spare time (!) he plays lute, guitar and ukulele."

source: http://ricerche.aquilacorde.com/chi-e-mimmo-peruffo/

Croaky Keith
01-17-2017, 11:03 PM
Sounded just like I pronounce it. :D

robinboyd
01-17-2017, 11:55 PM
Thanks Mimmo. I admit I had wondered.

hammer40
01-18-2017, 12:52 AM
I hear it pronounced some many ways. I looked it up once a while ago for the correct pronunciation. I was saying it wrong prior to that.

Doc_J
01-18-2017, 02:25 AM
Thanks Mimmo.

Looks like the wiktionary got it right. :)

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/aquila#Pronunciation

Sharpshin
01-18-2017, 04:35 AM
Thank you Mimmo!
I have wondered many times. I thought I knew but was actually pronouncing it as if it were spanish, and then watched a few videos from other nations and really got thrown off! Almost gave up! smile. So I appreciate being redirected to proper sound of "Aquila".
I think I can go restring a ukulele now...smile

Joyful Uke
01-18-2017, 04:43 AM
I've wondered, and appreciate you letting us know the correct pronunciation.

willisoften
01-18-2017, 05:11 AM
I would care if I was trying to buy an eagle from an Italian, but as I'm buying strings from the internet.... For the record I think I'll pronounce it Ack- weela and hope that Italians selling Ukulele Strings and Eagles all forgive me.

mikelz777
01-18-2017, 05:39 AM
Now I know how to pronounce the brand of strings that I don't like! :D

Nickie
01-18-2017, 08:46 AM
Thanks, there are at least 6 pronunciations around here!

actadh
01-18-2017, 09:14 AM
Timely post - I was in a music store yesterday and two sales people and I were all using different pronunciations. BTW, Aquila New Nylgut strings sound great on my Luna concert with much resonance and sustain, and i love the Aquila Reds on my Silvertone soprano.

Debussychopin
01-18-2017, 09:29 AM
From Aldrine and Aquila themselves in a NAMM interview: "AH-kwee-la"

Before that, I always pronounced it in my mind, "a-killa"

jollyboy
01-18-2017, 12:05 PM
After all that, I need a large shot of tekweela...

ubulele
01-18-2017, 01:03 PM
From Aldrine and Aquila themselves in a NAMM interview: "a-KWEE-la"

Before that, I always pronounced it in my mind, "a-killa"

Except that the accent is on the FIRST syllable: AH-kwee-la.

Debussychopin
01-18-2017, 01:14 PM
Except that the accent is on the FIRST syllable: AH-kwee-la.

Thanks. Corrected.

willisoften
01-18-2017, 01:42 PM
A very myopic view, Will, unless you never talk to other people about strings.

I talk to other people about all sorts of things I worked with a number of Italians and normally talk was about food and football,
I imagine I pronounce Napoli, Torino, Juventus, Milan and Roma badly along with equally poor pronunciation of: spaghetti, ravioli, chianti, linguini, tagliatelle and girandole;
One things I can see clearly from my short-sighted view point lifes too short to worry about the precise pronunciation of brand names from Hawaii Japan China Italy blah blah blah

Debussychopin
01-18-2017, 06:39 PM
Life's not too short to concern over proper pronunciation and doing things correctly if one can.
Don't you want to learn?

Even more so, philosophically, if life was very short, wouldn't want you to do it the right way?

But life is long! What a luxury most of us have. And not only that, tons of resources around us to learn things the proper way.

mds725
01-18-2017, 09:21 PM
One things I can see clearly from my short-sighted view point lifes too short to worry about the precise pronunciation of brand names from Hawaii Japan China Italy blah blah blah

Thank you for that Wihh-LIS-oooooooh-FIN.

Booli
01-18-2017, 10:55 PM
Life's not too short to concern over proper pronunciation and doing things correctly if one can.
Don't you want to learn?

Even more so, philosophically, if life was very short, wouldn't want you to do it the right way?

But life is long! What a luxury most of us have. And not only that, tons of resources around us to learn things the proper way.

I agree. I also find it disrespectful when the owner of the company takes the time to provide information here on UU for the benefit of others and someone makes comments that demonstrate such apathy or willful ignorance.

It's just bad manners.

ukatee
01-19-2017, 01:00 AM
Out of interest, how do you Americans on here pronounce 'Worcester', as in Worcester Sauce?

You do know that the correct, native British pronunciation is 'Woo-ster' and not 'Wur-ses-ter'? And now that you know, you are going to say it correctly in the future, aren't you? Good!

:D :D :D

Booli
01-19-2017, 01:18 AM
Out of interest, how do you Americans on here pronounce 'Worcester', as in Worcester Sauce?

You do know that the correct, native British pronunciation is 'Woo-ster' and not 'Wur-ses-ter'? And now that you know, you are going to say it correctly in the future, aren't you?

:D :D :D

Yep. When I was a wee lad, I had said 'war-chester'. I was a literal little punk. Like many folks on here I'm sure.

Then a few yrs later in school, learned that actual pronunciations of 'English' words vary from their spelling around the world, and that many words in this language are derivative of, or influenced by other languages. Since then, I've said 'woo-ster' even though I admit that in my head it is still 'war-chester' and have to consciously correct myself before the word comes out of my mouth, even now @ 47 yrs old.

When I was little and the first time I heard a British or Australian person speak 'English', in such an 'accent' compared to the Bronxy-NJ 'accent' all around me in the Mid-Atlantic East Coast USA, I nearly lost my mind - so different but so similar...

but it's all good now! :)

OhioBelle
01-19-2017, 01:27 AM
Out of interest, how do you Americans on here pronounce 'Worcester', as in Worcester Sauce?

You do know that the correct, native British pronunciation is 'Woo-ster' and not 'Wur-ses-ter'? And now that you know, you are going to say it correctly in the future, aren't you? Good!

:D :D :D

LOL! Good one to bring up. As a girl growing up in the Deep South of the US, I learned "ROO-ster-sheer." HUH???? where did THAT come from?

Thanks to mimmo for the Italian lesson. I'm afraid my Spanish lessons were having too much of an influence on how I heard Aquila in my head. I'm glad I know the correct way, now.

Booli
01-19-2017, 03:52 AM
LOL! Good one to bring up. As a girl growing up in the Deep South of the US, I learned "ROO-ster-sheer." HUH???? where did THAT come from?

Thanks to mimmo for the Italian lesson. I'm afraid my Spanish lessons were having too much of an influence on how I heard Aquila in my head. I'm glad I know the correct way, now.

All y'all gotta tells the story true, and bless his heart that he tried to help the unwashed masses with learnin an' things that make a brain expand :D

janeray1940
01-19-2017, 04:15 PM
I'm all for pronouncing things correctly, and appreciate Mimmo's input, but - sometimes it's just easier to go with what's commonly accepted. I live in Los Angeles and speak some Spanish, so I know that technically I live in "LOHS AHN-heh-less," but in conversation if I said anything other than "LOSS ANN-JEALOUS" most people would get confused. Either that, or think that I'm a pompous... donkey.

I think the same would happen if I asked for "AH-kwee-la" strings at the shop. It's probably due to the Spanish-language influence around here, but I don't think I know a single person who calls them anything but "a-KEE-luh."

I also speak Japanese - and DON'T EVEN get me started on what non-speakers do to "karaoke." Or "kamikaze." Or "hara-kiri..." :)