PDA

View Full Version : Can I Play a Baritone Ukulele in a Group Guitar Class?



ALing
02-14-2017, 08:02 PM
I am using my baritone ukulele (DGBE) and playing chord shapes learned on my other ukuleles (GCEA). And I am doing all this in a group guitar class.

I realize that I am not sounding quite compatible with the guitar players in the class. I am guessing that I am not in the right key but I can't figure out how to make the adjustment.

I would like to keep using the chord shapes that I know but be compatible with the guitar players. Is this possible?

I know the answer involves music theory but I am not at that level of understanding yet. Can anyone help? Thank you.

kypfer
02-14-2017, 09:16 PM
The chord shapes on all three instruments are the same, just the names change, depending on the tuning.

Your baritone is the same as the top four strings on a guitar, so, assuming you are actually at the same pitch as the guitars in your group, if you play the same chord shapes as them, you should sound the same.

For starters, the C-shape used on a soprano ukulele plays G on a baritone & guitar, D on the soprano ukulele plays A etc. etc. ... you'll notice there's a fixed relationship, simply because the soprano ukulele is tuned like a guitar with a capo on the 5th fret ;)

Hope this helps :music:

siesta171
02-14-2017, 11:44 PM
The easiest way to fit in with your baritone (for me) is to put a capo on the fifth fret and use the same chords shapes as everybody else.

Choirguy
02-15-2017, 12:34 AM
Just to make it clear: when you play G on Soprano, Concert, or Tenor, you are playing D on a Guitar or a Baritone.

But then, when your guitar friends are playing C, you are actually playing G if you use your Soprano/Alto/Tenor shapes while you read the charts.

A capo is a quick solution, but if you really want to play Baritone and did so for the sound of the instrument, a capo isn't a long term solution. Eventually you have to learn the name of the chords on the baritone. Maybe print this out and have it on hand? http://halesowenuke.yolasite.com/resources/baritoneukulelechordchart.pdf

OhioBelle
02-15-2017, 01:41 AM
Why does ALing need a capo to play with guitars if the baritone is tuned DGBE?

Doug W
02-15-2017, 01:57 AM
Why does ALing need a capo to play with guitars if the baritone is tuned DGBE?
As OhioBelle points out, Aling is playing with guitars not ukuleles, no capo required!

DownUpDave
02-15-2017, 02:08 AM
As OhioBelle points out, Aling is playing with guitars not ukuleles, no capo required!

If I am reading Alings post correctly he is using GCEA chord shapes on his baritone, playing with guitar players he is then WAY out of key. That would be like me and you playing sopranos together and while you are playing G C F I am playing C F Bb........won't sound very good together.

If Aling was playing a soprano, concert or tenor uke in C tuning he could use the standard GCEA chord shapes and be in the same key as the guitar players. But with a baritone he will not be in the same key and must use baritone/guitar chord shapes/names

ALing the chord shapes are the same they just a have a different name. In other words 0003 on a GCEA soprano is called a C chord it is a G chord for DGBE tuned baritones. Same shape different name

JackLuis
02-15-2017, 02:37 AM
Get a Baritone Cord sheet and learn the names for the chord forms. It takes a while to convert to the Dark Side, but it is not too hard. I keep one chord sheet of each C and G handy so when I switch up, I can refer to my chord sheets. Think of the chord forms as numerical (2010, 0003, ect) and then think in Baritone=C or G and Concert =F or C.

One way I practice is by getting out my Key Chord chart that lists the Chords for each key and play I-IV-V-VI for each key, mine has major and minor keys. I just use a common strum pattern and Rotate through the Keys to teach my left hand,my 'ear', and my brain to pick the right form for the right chord in each key. I've been playing mostly G tuning in the last year but switch most days to C for a while, just to keep my hand in.

Doug W
02-15-2017, 02:41 AM
DownUpDave,

Since Aling was asking about chord shapes and not the chord names, my response would be to follow the chord shapes that the guitars are using and you will be fine. A guitar D chord looks just like a baritone uke D chord.

DownUpDave
02-15-2017, 06:41 AM
Right you are Doug, good advice

ALing
02-15-2017, 09:41 AM
Thank you for all your helpful comments. I have better clarity now on the differences in tuning and how to play a ukulele amongst a group of guitar players.

I will recap here so that it stays clear in my mind:

To play the baritone ukulele (DGBE), I can get a baritone uke chord chart and play those chords. I can play the guitar chords as they are similar to the baritone uke chords. I can capo the baritone uke at the 5th fret so that I can play the same chords I learned for a GCEA uke.

I could also use my concert or tenor ukuleles (GCEA) directly, playing the GCEA chords, and be in tune with the guitar.

Finally, I can practice with both just for the fun of it :>.

Thank you again.

Alex.

Aliyah
02-16-2017, 07:57 AM
Check out the best baritone ukulele (http://www.ukulelebuzz.com/best-baritone-ukulele/) reviews if anyone looking to buy baritone ukulele at ukulelebuzz.

bunnyf
02-16-2017, 09:24 AM
Thank you for all your helpful comments. I have better clarity now on the differences in tuning and how to play a ukulele amongst a group of guitar players.

I will recap here so that it stays clear in my mind:

To play the baritone ukulele (DGBE), I can get a baritone uke chord chart and play those chords. I can play the guitar chords as they are similar to the baritone uke chords. I can capo the baritone uke at the 5th fret so that I can play the same chords I learned for a GCEA uke.

I could also use my concert or tenor ukuleles (GCEA) directly, playing the GCEA chords, and be in tune with the guitar.

Finally, I can practice with both just for the fun of it :>.

Thank you again.

Alex.

Alex, you can also get gcea strings (Southcoast, for one) for your Bari and stick with what you know. I personally prefer the sound of dgbe, but that's another option.

Patrick Madsen
02-16-2017, 01:09 PM
If tuned D<G<B<E, it's the same as a guitar. You could use the same book they are using. The only difference is your chord shape would not include the two bottom strings; E,A. No big deal at all

ALing
02-17-2017, 07:27 PM
I am surprised that you have not been asked to leave or learn the chords by the guitar players, you are lucky to be with a group of tolerant guitar students, they can be very rare to find.
If you read the stuff written by the Favilla family, the makers of Favilla Baritines, they originally built baritone ukes for people with small hands to get started on learning how to play the guitar. The baritone is effectively . . ..

Hi Bill1,

My class is called "Campfire Guitar" with an instructor. He specifically states in his brochure that he welcomes all stringed instruments - I happen to be the only new guy with a ukulele.

It is interesting to know the origins of the Favilla Baritone. I like the baritone ukulele for exactly those reasons. It's helpful to know that the baritone is effectively a guitar without the two low strings.

The replies from everyone here have been very helpful. Being informed, I can communicate more effectively with the instructor. I now have a better idea on how to be compatible with the guitar players in the class.

Both the instructor and the other class members have been very welcoming. I could have joined a ukulele jam group, but for various reasons, I decided to join this "Campfire" group. The instructor has also indicated that he will be adding ukulele chords to the handouts.

ALing
02-17-2017, 07:29 PM
Alex, you can also get gcea strings (Southcoast, for one) for your Bari and stick with what you know. I personally prefer the sound of dgbe, but that's another option.

Good to know. Thank you.

Patrick Madsen
02-17-2017, 09:25 PM
I agree Aling, the Favilla baritone is probably one of the better bargins out there. I owned one from the '50's and I surly miss it. they used to call it a poor man's Martin though many of the old pro's preferred a Favilla over a Martin. The F. has a deep smokey blues sound to it.

IMO, GCEA makes a baritone sound thin. It doesn't drive the soundboard like a G. If you put GCEA on , Bb tuning sounds really good.

stevepetergal
02-18-2017, 04:03 AM
Can I Play a Baritone Ukulele in a Group Guitar Class?

Just a thought. You can play your Eb Sousaphone with a string quartet. It depends on the group whether or not your contribution is appreciated.

groundhogday
02-18-2017, 06:00 PM
If tuned D<G<B<E, it's the same as a guitar. You could use the same book they are using. The only difference is your chord shape would not include the two bottom strings; E,A. No big deal at all

This. The only thing you have to do differently than the guitarists is ignore anything related to strings 5 & 6. Plus if you ever decide to take up guitar, you're already 2/3 of the way there if you've learned the proper chord shapes for DGBE tuning.

Louis0815
02-23-2017, 11:00 PM
It has been said already, but let me wrap it up again:

A chord is a group of notes with certain intervals between each other - this is what you hear. Depending on the intervals and notes included it has a certain name (e.g. C or Am or G7). And of course a chord can be created by any musical instrument capable of creating the individual notes of that chord.

A shape (or chord shape) is what you do with your fingers on your ukulele (or any other instrument) to create that chord.

Which leads to some conclusions:
1. Different tunings produce different chords out of the same shape
2. To get the same chord on different tunings/instruments you need different shapes/finger positions

Another workaround for you might be to replace the DGBE names with GCEA names of the same shapes, e.g. to play a G chord (0003 on DGBE tuning) write "C" on your tab sheet. Your eyes see "C" and your brain moves the fingers automatically to the known GCEA positions for C - which are 0003.

The mapping table for the letters is below, whatever comes after the letter (e.g. 7, m, M7, dim, ...) remains the same:



DGBE shape:
G
G# or Ab
A
A# or Bb
B
C
C# or Db
D
D# or Eb
E
F
F# or Gb



GCEA shape:
C
C# or Db
D
D# or Eb
E
F
F# or Gb
G
G# or Ab
A
A# or Bb
B