PDA

View Full Version : How Many Holes Can You Put in a Uke?



Twibbly
02-15-2017, 03:21 AM
I'm looking at eventually getting to the point where I can go backpacking (accumulating gear, getting in shape, etc.).

I'm reading stuff about people breaking off handles on cups, shaving off handles on things, etc., in an attempt to save a bit of weight.

Which brings me to my question.

How many holes could you make, how big, and where would you place them, on an Outdoor Ukulele Soprano (http://www.outdoorukulele.com/collections/ukuleles/products/outdoor-ukulele-soprano-green) to save weight without completely destroying the sound? :rotfl:

Note: No ukuleles were injured in the asking of this question. It is entirely theoretical at this point, as I haven't got an OU Soprano.

UkerDanno
02-15-2017, 03:35 AM
you're only going to save a few ounces...

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 03:35 AM
you're only going to save a few ounces...

I know. As I said, it's a theoretical question. Mostly for my own amusement, as I don't know if I'd be able to bring myself to drill holes in a uke...

dhbailey
02-15-2017, 03:38 AM
My ukulele (Kala bocote tenor) is so light now that I can't imagine putting any holes in the wooden body will save enough weight to be noticed. The main weight on any uke is the neck and the tuning machines and you can't reduce the weight there. When you mention "backpacking" what exactly do you mean? The people who are breaking off handles from cups, etc. are likely planning to be backpacking for weeks at a time, if not months (such as hiking the Appalachian Trail). If you're just hiking into a campground, camping out for a few days or a week and then hiking back out to your car I can't imagine that reducing the weight of a ukulele by cutting holes will make any difference in your trip. However hiking for weeks or months, I wouldn't even consider bringing a ukulele with me. I'd go for size as well as weight and bring something like a harmonica if I want to make music. The added bulk of a ukulele would be impractical in my opinion.

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 03:39 AM
My ukulele (Kala bocote tenor) is so light now that I can't imagine putting any holes in the wooden body will save enough weight to be noticed. The main weight on any uke is the neck and the tuning machines and you can't reduce the weight there. When you mention "backpacking" what exactly do you mean? The people who are breaking off handles from cups, etc. are likely planning to be backpacking for weeks at a time, if not months (such as hiking the Appalachian Trail). If you're just hiking into a campground, camping out for a few days or a week and then hiking back out to your car I can't imagine that reducing the weight of a ukulele by cutting holes will make any difference in your trip. However hiking for weeks or months, I wouldn't even consider bringing a ukulele with me. I'd go for size as well as weight and bring something like a harmonica if I want to make music. The added bulk of a ukulele would be impractical in my opinion.

It amuses me to try to figure out things like this. It may never happen, but it's interesting to think about.

cml
02-15-2017, 03:57 AM
Start with the 3 for 3 rule, and you dont need to drill holes into your uke.

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 04:00 AM
Start with the 3 for 3 rule, and you dont need to drill holes into your uke.

This one (http://www.fjaderlatt.se/p/343-method.html)?

I hadn't run across that rule before. The backpacking stuff that's that light tends to be waaaaay out of my price range.

cml
02-15-2017, 04:25 AM
Yeah thats the one :)! Funny that you found a swedish site with it, the rule is from the ultralight bp community in the us. Doesnt have to be expensive, it's more of a mindset thing.

PereBourik
02-15-2017, 04:25 AM
This thread's worth it if only for the 343 rule.
Thanks Twibs.

Down Up Dick
02-15-2017, 04:30 AM
Tie a long string on it and drag it along behind you. No weight to carry at all! :old:

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 04:33 AM
This thread's worth it if only for the 343 rule.
Thanks Twibs.

See? See? I am useful!

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 04:33 AM
Tie a long string on it and drag it along behind you. No weight to carry at all! :old:

While the OU is made to be abused, that might be pushing the limits.

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 04:34 AM
Yeah thats the one :)! Funny that you found a swedish site with it, the rule is from the ultralight bp community in the us. Doesnt have to be expensive, it's more of a mindset thing.

*nodnod*

I will keep it in mind whilst figuring out what equipment I'm going to put together.

cml
02-15-2017, 04:37 AM
Yeah thats the one :)! Funny that you found a swedish site with it, the rule is from the ultralight bp community in the us. Doesnt have to be expensive, it's more of a mindset thing.
Also if you're two people thats easier, since you share the tent weight. There are cheap and great alternatives out there :). Luxe outdoor for example seem to get great reviews at low cost, if that is available down under.

Croaky Keith
02-15-2017, 04:40 AM
I wouldn't be putting holes in one to save weight, but a side sound hole could let you fill it with small items, & therefore it wouldn't take up much room overall. ;)

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 04:42 AM
Also if you're two people thats easier, since you share the tent weight. There are cheap and great alternatives out there :). Luxe outdoor for example seem to get great reviews at low cost, if that is available down under.

These people (https://www.amazon.com/Footprint-High-end-Silnylon-Backpacking-Vestibules/dp/B01M4KI9TK)?

spookelele
02-15-2017, 04:48 AM
Tie a long string on it and drag it along behind you. No weight to carry at all! :old:

they actually make a single wheel cart to carry stuff while hiking/backpacking.

Heres one... but there are others. Some lighter, with a bigger wheel for rougher terrain.

https://gearjunkie.com/mule-backpack

That being said, I dont think drilling a uke is worth it. You'd be better off changing out other gear. If you are using a mug that has a handle you can break off... your cup is probably too heavy anyway. Changing to a light camp mug would be better, and then you can use it to boil as well.

There's lots of places to cut for ul packing that will be a better use of the weight than drilling out a uke. More efficient use of items that can be multi purpose will save any weight you are trying to shave.

And really, your big 3 are the biggest weight offenders outside of water.

Think of it this way, you pee once, and you'll drop more weight than youll save drilling your uke.

cml
02-15-2017, 04:54 AM
These people (https://www.amazon.com/Footprint-High-end-Silnylon-Backpacking-Vestibules/dp/B01M4KI9TK)?
This was the brand: http://www.backpackinglight.co.uk/shelters-3/WG109.html

But Im sure there are plenty of other options :).

kohanmike
02-15-2017, 05:06 AM
This is more than theory; I had this uke made a few weeks ago by Bruce Wei in Vietnam when I saw the design on his eBay store. It has really good projection and sustain. I has a solid spalted mango top and binding, and solid curly mango body, no top sound hole, but there are 8 sound holes around the bouts, including a larger one in the cutaway, though each has a decorative insert so. If it's lighter than my other standard ukes, I sure can't tell. (He also makes one with the Hawaiian Islands as stop sound holes so it looks like a fair amount can be cut out, but for little weight savings.)

http://www.kohanmike.com/uploads/Spalted done montage.jpg

http://www.kohanmike.com/uploads/BWA Hawaii uke.jpg

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 05:12 AM
This is more than theory; I had this uke made a few weeks ago by Bruce Wei in Vietnam when I saw the design on his eBay store. It has really good projection and sustain. I has a solid spalted mango top and binding, and solid curly mango body, no top sound hole, but there are 8 sound holes around the bouts, including a larger one in the cutaway, though each has a decorative insert so. If it's lighter than my other standard ukes, I sure can't tell. (He also makes one with the Hawaiian Islands as stop sound holes so it looks like a fair amount can be cut out, but for little weight savings.)

That's awesome. Yeah, I know the weight savings will be minimal, the theory just amuses me.

spookelele
02-15-2017, 05:16 AM
If you're looking to shed weight... have you considered hammock camping? If you're in terrain where you can hang.... it cant really be beat. MUCH more comfortable than a tent, and usually lighter. Under/top quilt is almost the same as a bag, weight wise, but the great sleep you get in a hammock vs tent/pad/bag is soooooo worth it. I have one with a built in bug net so I don't even have to worry about bugs in season. Also.. alot of the rain fly's can be used as a tarp tent if you use treking poles..which I would also suggest. Poles seem like they'd be weight you don't want, but they save alot of energy because you don't have to do as much balance correction, so they pay off in spades.

Kayak Jim
02-15-2017, 05:23 AM
Here's my travel uke. Takes less space and stronger. I pack this in checked luggage in just a nylon gig bag with no worries.

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?91904-Acoustic-Electric-Travel-Uke-40-amp-2-Hours-Work

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 05:31 AM
If you're looking to shed weight... have you considered hammock camping? If you're in terrain where you can hang.... it cant really be beat. MUCH more comfortable than a tent, and usually lighter. Under/top quilt is almost the same as a bag, weight wise, but the great sleep you get in a hammock vs tent/pad/bag is soooooo worth it. I have one with a built in bug net so I don't even have to worry about bugs in season. Also.. alot of the rain fly's can be used as a tarp tent if you use treking poles..which I would also suggest. Poles seem like they'd be weight you don't want, but they save alot of energy because you don't have to do as much balance correction, so they pay off in spades.

West Texas is not exactly known for trees (unless you count mesquite trees...).

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 05:33 AM
Here's my travel uke. Takes less space and stronger. I pack this in checked luggage in just a nylon gig bag with no worries.

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?91904-Acoustic-Electric-Travel-Uke-40-amp-2-Hours-Work

Now I'm eyeballing the Makala MK-S I'm not thrilled with...but I'd need to take it to Dad's shop and ask for help. :-P

spookelele
02-15-2017, 06:37 AM
West Texas is not exactly known for trees (unless you count mesquite trees...).

You can probably get away with a tarp tent there. It would save you alot of weight, as long as you can stake into the ground. If you can't you'll need a freestanding which adds weight.

I use this for my hamock. It can be used with treking poles and stakes to do a puptent style. It would save you alot of weight.

https://www.eaglesnestoutfittersinc.com/product/HOUSEFLY.html

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 07:32 AM
You can probably get away with a tarp tent there. It would save you alot of weight, as long as you can stake into the ground. If you can't you'll need a freestanding which adds weight.

I use this for my hamock. It can be used with treking poles and stakes to do a puptent style. It would save you alot of weight.

https://www.eaglesnestoutfittersinc.com/product/HOUSEFLY.html

Too many skeeters. And they LIKE me.

Tonya
02-15-2017, 07:59 AM
We're a backpacking family and have been since our sons (now in their 30s) were toddlers. I've carried my Soprano Ovation on many a week-long trek for entertainment in the evenings. I'm serious about weight of things when hiking but I also balance out the "joy" and aesthetics of the experience so the ukulele frequently comes along (with its factory weight). My mantra for lightweight is to analyze all the stuff I'm bringing and then decide which items are there strictly because of a "what if" fear. Fear is what makes a pack heavy. I have my gear down to just what I "need" as well as a few "delights"--and then I lace up my boots and start walking.

All that said, if you're planning a *long* trek (as in more than three weeks), I have different advice. Our youngest son hiked the Pacific Crest Trail solo after college graduation. His experience was that on a long hike, he would have had no time to play ukulele. After hiking 30+ miles of mountain trail in a day and devouring Snickers bars throughout the sunshine hours to keep the calorie intake up (imagine!), he simply hung his bear bag and tumbled into bed at night. His only "entertainment" was his pro camera to document the trip. An ukulele wouldn't have gotten much use in this scenario.

'Not sure what your plans are, but those are two scenarios--one for taking one and one for not. Tell us what *you* decide.

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 08:02 AM
Tonya, I'm looking at shorter trips, at least to start. This is all theoretical, as if I tried to backpack right now, I'd keel over dead by the 5 mile marker. Future goals!

Kayak Jim
02-15-2017, 10:18 AM
Tonya, I'm looking at shorter trips, at least to start. This is all theoretical, as if I tried to backpack right now, I'd keel over dead by the 5 mile marker. Future goals!

I see. So it's pretty much theoretical holes for a theoretical trip. Do you even have a uke?

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 10:19 AM
I see. So it's pretty much theoretical holes for a theoretical trip. Do you even have a uke?

I have 4! Including an OU Tenor.

BigMamaJ40
02-15-2017, 01:25 PM
How many holes? Depends on how good of a shot you are...

Twibbly
02-15-2017, 04:24 PM
Thanks for another rabbit hole to go down, Bill.

*googles Ray Jardine*

PereBourik
02-15-2017, 04:37 PM
We're a backpacking family and have been since our sons (now in their 30s) were toddlers. I've carried my Soprano Ovation on many a week-long trek for entertainment in the evenings. I'm serious about weight of things when hiking but I also balance out the "joy" and aesthetics of the experience so the ukulele frequently comes along (with its factory weight). My mantra for lightweight is to analyze all the stuff I'm bringing and then decide which items are there strictly because of a "what if" fear. Fear is what makes a pack heavy. I have my gear down to just what I "need" as well as a few "delights"--and then I lace up my boots and start walking.

All that said, if you're planning a *long* trek (as in more than three weeks), I have different advice. Our youngest son hiked the Pacific Crest Trail solo after college graduation. His experience was that on a long hike, he would have had no time to play ukulele. After hiking 30+ miles of mountain trail in a day and devouring Snickers bars throughout the sunshine hours to keep the calorie intake up (imagine!), he simply hung his bear bag and tumbled into bed at night. His only "entertainment" was his pro camera to document the trip. An ukulele wouldn't have gotten much use in this scenario.

'Not sure what your plans are, but those are two scenarios--one for taking one and one for not. Tell us what *you* decide.

I did scenario 2: the Camino Santiago across northern Spain. I carried a Flea and did not regret it. In fact it gave rise to a few lasting friendships along the way. Because of the fatigue you mention I didn't play it nearly as much as I thought I would.

I did not put any holes in it. I did put another sticker on it. It's a three-continent uke now.

Twibbly
02-16-2017, 01:52 AM
I did scenario 2: the Camino Santiago across northern Spain. I carried a Flea and did not regret it. In fact it gave rise to a few lasting friendships along the way. Because of the fatigue you mention I didn't play it nearly as much as I thought I would.

I did not put any holes in it. I did put another sticker on it. It's a three-continent uke now.

That sounds like FUN!

Rllink
02-16-2017, 02:22 AM
Four pages and no one has told you how many holes you can put in it before you destroy the sound, and I don't really know what destroying the sound is, but we are talking hypothetical here, so I guess that would be hypothetical as well. I'll say nine, but then we have to ask hypothetically, what size holes? So I'm going to say nine hypothetical one inch holes. But if you want to go beyond hypothetical, you could quit thinking about it and start drilling holes, and then at some point you would be the world authority on the subject. That would be something. But on a not hypothetical note, I think that the idea of a side hole big enough to stuff all of your underwear in there is a good idea. Otherwise that is a lot of wasted space.

PereBourik
02-16-2017, 03:45 AM
That sounds like FUN!

Stickers are:
PoHo (talk to Mr Curtis)
Ukulele Underground
Crocodile Safety from Kakadu National Park, NWT, Australia
Camino Shell way marker

actadh
02-16-2017, 03:59 AM
Too many skeeters. And they LIKE me.

I have the Kamprite IPS (Insect Protection System) tent. No skeeters get into it. It is lightweight and super easy to set up. You can use it on top of a cot, too. (Mine new was about $25 less than MSRP on the Kamprite website below.) I like it because at 40" high it is taller than most single person tents.

I have even used it inside of another tent. I often camp with a Coleman Instant Tent and one time the stink bugs were so bad that I had my gear, chair, table, cot in that tent and put the IPS on top of the cot and slept inside of it.

https://kamprite.com/shop/tents/kamp-rite-insect-protection-system-ips/

You can also pack it like a bedroll and not use the little storage bag that comes with it - just leave your sleeping bag in it, take out the tent stakes, roll it from the bottom, and bungee cord it together. You could even bungee your uke to it :)

Ziret
02-16-2017, 06:24 AM
I have the Kamprite IPS (Insect Protection System) tent. No skeeters get into it. It is lightweight and super easy to set up. You can use it on top of a cot, too. (Mine new was about $25 less than MSRP on the Kamprite website below.) I like it because at 40" high it is taller than most single person tents.

I have even used it inside of another tent. I often camp with a Coleman Instant Tent and one time the stink bugs were so bad that I had my gear, chair, table, cot in that tent and put the IPS on top of the cot and slept inside of it.

https://kamprite.com/shop/tents/kamp-rite-insect-protection-system-ips/

You can also pack it like a bedroll and not use the little storage bag that comes with it - just leave your sleeping bag in it, take out the tent stakes, roll it from the bottom, and bungee cord it together. You could even bungee your uke to it :)

Great, now I want that tent. I bought a super comfy old-person cot that's too big for my young-person tent. Solution found. thanks!

Twibbly
02-16-2017, 07:56 AM
I have the Kamprite IPS (Insect Protection System) tent. No skeeters get into it. It is lightweight and super easy to set up. You can use it on top of a cot, too. (Mine new was about $25 less than MSRP on the Kamprite website below.) I like it because at 40" high it is taller than most single person tents.

I have even used it inside of another tent. I often camp with a Coleman Instant Tent and one time the stink bugs were so bad that I had my gear, chair, table, cot in that tent and put the IPS on top of the cot and slept inside of it.

https://kamprite.com/shop/tents/kamp-rite-insect-protection-system-ips/

You can also pack it like a bedroll and not use the little storage bag that comes with it - just leave your sleeping bag in it, take out the tent stakes, roll it from the bottom, and bungee cord it together. You could even bungee your uke to it :)

I used to have a tent almost like that, but with only one pole.

*saves for later*

kkimura
02-17-2017, 01:54 AM
Since weight isn't that much of a factor on short hikes, I'm assuming we're talking about longer hikes. The best way to reduce weight on a long hike is to not carry it. But not carrying it defeats the purpose of taking a ukulele on the hike with you. The solution to this dilemma is to cache ukuleles along the trail where you plan to stop. Outdoor ukes being plastic can also be used to stash food and water thereby further reducing weight carried on the hike. That leaves the original question on holes, which by the way makes any uke a poor container for water. The solution is to have your uke blessed by a representative of the denomination of your choice. That will suffice to make it as holy as you desire (and then some).

Twibbly
02-17-2017, 07:24 AM
Since weight isn't that much of a factor on short hikes, I'm assuming we're talking about longer hikes. The best way to reduce weight on a long hike is to not carry it. But not carrying it defeats the purpose of taking a ukulele on the hike with you. The solution to this dilemma is to cache ukuleles along the trail where you plan to stop. Outdoor ukes being plastic can also be used to stash food and water thereby further reducing weight carried on the hike. That leaves the original question on holes, which by the way makes any uke a poor container for water. The solution is to have your uke blessed by a representative of the denomination of your choice. That will suffice to make it as holy as you desire (and then some).

Bwuhahah! But if I have it blessed, will that affect the styles of music it can play? :p

kkimura
02-17-2017, 07:48 AM
Bwuhahah! But if I have it blessed, will that affect the styles of music it can play? :p

Holy ukulele Twibbly, would you want to be miles from help on the Appalachian Trail playing "The Devil Goes Down To Georgia" or a "Black Sabbath" under those conditions?

Twibbly
02-17-2017, 08:02 AM
Holy ukulele Twibbly, would you want to be miles from help on the Appalachian Trail playing "The Devil Goes Down To Georgia" or a "Black Sabbath" under those conditions?

...the first thing my husband did on my uke was figure out Dueling Banjos.

Uh, yeah!

RichM
02-17-2017, 08:06 AM
All questions answered here:


https://youtu.be/O6rHeD5x2tI

kkimura
02-18-2017, 04:23 AM
You all need ta pack two ukes for dual'n banjos on the trail.

Twibbly
02-18-2017, 01:04 PM
You all need ta pack two ukes for dual'n banjos on the trail.

*starts pondering if somebody's going to end up shooting her for freakin' them out*

kkimura
02-19-2017, 01:35 AM
*starts pondering if somebody's going to end up shooting her for freakin' them out*

Nah, holey ukes always breeze through.