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View Full Version : The better spot for strap.



zztush
03-08-2017, 12:31 AM
Headstock is better than heel for strap to me. It is more stable more easy on soprano and tenor.

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DownUpDave
03-08-2017, 02:04 AM
Headstock is better than heel for strap to me. It is more stable more easy on soprano and tenor.

https://s19.postimg.org/q0mpvf9qb/index.jpg (https://postimg.org/image/oll56p8n3/)image hosting 15mb (https://postimage.org/)

Seeing as this is in the beginners section and people reading this might take it a gospel I am going to disagree. For "ME" the better spot for a strap is on the heel of the neck, your green line.

Do an experiment with an instrument that has it strap tied to the head stock, let go of it. The uke will slide downward diagonally with the but end sticking out and the headstock now close to your body, it is completely out of playing postion. Let go of a uke with the strap attached to the heel and it does not move, it stays in it's playing postion. This to me is more stable.

But everyone needs to try it both ways and see what they like better for themselves. Like most things with the ukulele there are very few hard and fast rules and you should do whatever works best for yourself. Just a counter point :D

zztush
03-08-2017, 02:28 AM
Thank you for the reply, Dave!

It is very simple thing. But I think it is hard to discuss. Because I can not see your situation. I have my strap button on my heel too. I have never seen headstock slide downward even on guitars with a strap tied on headstock. How can I see your situation? Do you know any photos in the internet?

Croaky Keith
03-08-2017, 02:52 AM
:stop: There is no right or wrong place to attach straps.

It will depend to a degree on how you play - I rarely use a strap but when I do, it is a neck loop attached to a button on the heel, it supports the weight, whilst I hold the uke in position.

DownUpDave
03-08-2017, 03:05 AM
Here are two pictures. Sorry for the poor quality but they were quickly taken while standing in front of a mirror. I play tenor and baritone mostly but even my soprano and concert will "slide" down and back when let go if tied at the head stock.

zztush
03-08-2017, 03:39 AM
https://s19.postimg.org/gb4dvzjer/P_20170308_231909_BF.jpg (https://postimg.org/image/3whlvnrwf/)free photo hosting (https://postimage.org/)

Dave, what makes the difference between mine and yours? I am quite happy with my situation with my guitalele (exactly same size of tenor).

DownUpDave
03-08-2017, 03:59 AM
https://s19.postimg.org/gb4dvzjer/P_20170308_231909_BF.jpg (https://postimg.org/image/3whlvnrwf/)free photo hosting (https://postimage.org/)

Dave, what makes the difference between mine and yours? I am quite happy with my situation with my guitalele (exactly same size of tenor).

It could be any number of things. Most of my ukes are high gloss so they are slippery. Most of my tenors are made with heavy woods like rosewood, cocobolo and macassar ebony. This would make them bottom heavy, maybe my shirts are slicker then yours.

That is why I said there are no hard and fast rules and everyone should do what works best for them. Experimenting will usually enlighten one to what is best for them. Good conversation as always zztush

zztush
03-08-2017, 04:04 AM
I think you like more natural style and do not like to keep the instruments by your picking hand (white circles) hard.

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actadh
03-08-2017, 04:31 AM
I prefer the heel on a soprano and the headstock on a tenor.

I have a harder time holding on to a soprano, so being on the heel gives me an extra bit of control. And, when I bought my Opio from HMS, that is where they put it, so that is kind of the holy grail for me :)

The tenor just needs a little stability, and having it tied on the headstock gives me more room to move.

zztush
03-08-2017, 04:44 AM
Hi, Laura! Thank you for the reply!

A friend of mine has changed his strap from heel to headstock on his soprano today. Hence I watched the difference in his case. He is big guy and strap on his heel was bit too tight for him. And his soprano tipped over when he was rest position. He is quite happy with headstock strap now.

actadh
03-08-2017, 05:15 AM
Hi zztush - straps definitely are an anatomy dependent item. I think the reason I have a hard time holding a soprano as a female is not an issue found with most males.

DownUpDave
03-08-2017, 05:34 AM
Hi zztush - straps definitely are an anatomy dependent item. I think the reason I have a hard time holding a soprano as a female is not an issue found with most males.

So true about the anatomy issue. There was a thread by a female member a few years back titled "Playing with Boobs". This was the actual title, it got a lot of views, the thread was all about being a women and the complexities of using a strap.

Gary52
03-08-2017, 05:39 AM
I like to attach the strap to the heel. I've had the same experience as DownUpDave. Also, when the strap is attached to the headstock it feels as if it's in the way of my fretting hand. I play concerts, BTW.

janeray1940
03-08-2017, 05:41 AM
Hi zztush - straps definitely are an anatomy dependent item. I think the reason I have a hard time holding a soprano as a female is not an issue found with most males.


So true about the anatomy issue. There was a thread by a female member a few years back titled "Playing with Boobs". This was the actual title, it got a lot of views, the thread was all about being a women and the complexities of using a strap.

That thread title still makes me chuckle. 3rd-ing the consensus that it's anatomy-dependent - and I'll go further and say it's not necessarily gender-dependent. Female here, and the only comfortable strap configuration for me is strap button on the bottom, other end fastened to the headstock.

But - there is no one size fits all solution. Take a look at how Janet Klein plays - she's definitely female, doesn't use a strap at all, and holds the uke up very high in a way that many women would be unable to do. She also doesn't play very complex things, and I think that makes a difference as well - strumming vs. fingerstyle.

kohanmike
03-08-2017, 06:09 AM
I play tenor and bass uke and prefer the heel for all my straps, which are leather with a rough suede back that prevents sliding.

zztush
03-08-2017, 12:38 PM
Thank you,Dave,Mike and Gary. I still can not experiment the slip on my uku. I will try to figure it out.

Thank you Laura and janeray. Comfortable location of the uku defer from person to person.

Top figure is Yoshio Tabata, who is Japanese famous singer. Bottom figure is Robert Trujillo, Mexican American heavy metal bass player. They are the two most highest and lowest example for me.

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janeray1940
03-08-2017, 03:31 PM
Janet Klein... not sure very many other women could do this! :)

98409

Jim Yates
03-08-2017, 08:31 PM
I use the headstock, but never right next to the nut. It seems to interfere with my left hand when I play in first position, so I tie it on above the first and fourth tuning pegs. My reso-uke came with a heel pin, so I left my strap there.
More important is how you wear the strap. I wear mine over my right shoulder rather than sticking my head through the strap. I also wear my mandolin this way, but stick my head through the banjo and guitar straps.
98410 98411

TCK
03-08-2017, 08:35 PM
Two weeks ago I put strap buttons on all my ukes (tenor and up) because I was tired of sitting. Every single one of them got a heel button as well, and they all got new straps. I use guitar straps on them (Couch (https://www.couchguitarstraps.com/guitar-straps.html) straps to be specific) I hated the headstock arrangement completely. My Mandolin is strapped to the headstock only because I fear I will hit the truss rod drilling....
Ukes, not a problem there. They position the Ukes perfectly and tilt them toward my body, and there is no stress on the neck...because I like to rock. I am not sure why I waited five years to do it (though drilling my ukes was scary the first time)

jnorris235
03-18-2017, 09:25 AM
I use the mobius strap, one loop under the strings, round underneath and up round your neck and back again.

Choirguy
03-18-2017, 11:54 AM
I was going to start a new thread, as I just (literally "just"--packed up the tools a minute ago) put strap buttons on my two last ukuleles without strap buttons.

[I still have my sopranino Caramel, but am not sure I will put strap buttons on it].

These two instruments are my Ukadelic (plastic body, wood top) Stars and Stripes and new (to me) Outdoor Soprano.

I bought buttons from eBay some time ago, to match the hardware on various instruments (silver, gold, and black). I installed buttons on all the wood ones, and even sent my Tenor Outdoor ukulele back to the company to have buttons installed on that instrument! Incidentally, they use a screw and lock nut to allow the strap button to hold against the polycarbonate ukulele.

So...I'm braver now than I was...so got out my drill for pilot holes (a MUST), taped the surface, marked where to drill, and drilled.

On these plastic ukuleles, I put super glue on the threads and on the bottom of the strap button (where it makes contact with the ukulele), and then screwed in the buttons.

Everything screwed in nicely--no loose turning or cracking sounds, and the super glue seemed to set nicely. I think this is going to work out well.

Granted, most of my playing is on tenor or my concerts (after the thread about the Kala C and SCG models today, I have been playing my Makala MK-CE and thinking about what a nice ukulele it is...starter instrument as it is), and my sopranos get pulled off the wall when I feel like they have been neglected. I have been playing the new Outdoor soprano a lot as it is new to me, and I also just swapped strings to fluorocarbon Martin 600s. That Outdoor has friction tuners (upgraded) and it was fun to replace the strings, although tuning is MUCH more sensitive than with geared tuners!

But like most others here, I like the strap buttons on the bottom of the ukulele and the underside of the neck on the side of the heel. Outdoor ukulele installed the button on the top of the shoulder of the instrument, on my side...not ideal...but it works. So no complaints.

By the way, for straps, I have been purchasing from strapsforchords.webs.com (in the UK) and really like their products (the owner put together a Dr. Who strap for me, as well as a Halloween strap) as well as from Shelley Mai at Bonanza Ukulele. I know that Sarah Maisel also makes straps.

in my own journey, I have moved from no strap to non-drilling solutions like Uke Leash, The Hug Strap (I would put the Mobius in that category, although I never owned one), and now I am into traditional 1" ukulele straps and have them on a lot of my ukuleles.

Tootler
03-22-2017, 03:28 AM
I now have straps on all my ukes mostly just on the base of the body with the other end tied to the headstock. Like Jim Yates, I attach the strap between the tuners as attaching them just behind the nut gets in the way of my left hand. I tried just looping the strap over the right shoulder and it didn't work for me, the strap just slides off. Another example of strap position being dependant on anatomy. Two ukes where I don't tie to the headstock are my baritone and my six string tenor and in both cases I have fitted a strap button to the heel of the neck.

I too get my straps from Straps For Chords. They're well made and she has some attractive designs and most of mine are music themed in some way. She has an ebay shop on ebay.co.uk traci56guineapigs. I don't know if she has one on ebay.com but it may be worth checking. I normally buy from her ebay shop as it's the easiest way for me.

Benjolele
03-22-2017, 12:02 PM
I use a strap button at the heel for all of my 4 string ukes. I like the balance of it and it makes the fretboard feel more accessible without the strap there.
Though I recently purchased a Kala 8 string solid acacia. The big slotted headstock with all those pretty tuners weighs so much that I've attached the strap to that for the sake of balance. Problem is that where I currently have it attached, right behind the nut, it interferes with my big ol' paws on a few chords (like Fm and E7 in the first position for example). I've gotta play with that a bit still.

Tootler
03-27-2017, 12:59 PM
I use a strap button at the heel for all of my 4 string ukes. I like the balance of it and it makes the fretboard feel more accessible without the strap there.
Though I recently purchased a Kala 8 string solid acacia. The big slotted headstock with all those pretty tuners weighs so much that I've attached the strap to that for the sake of balance. Problem is that where I currently have it attached, right behind the nut, it interferes with my big ol' paws on a few chords (like Fm and E7 in the first position for example). I've gotta play with that a bit still.

That's why I put a strap button on the heel of my 6 string tenor - because the tuners are too close together. All my other ukes have the strap attached to the headstock between the tuners and I make a little attachment strap to fit on the headstock from some strapping and press on buttons sold for denim jeans. You can buy them commercially but I make my own.

I reckon if you use a tie on bootlace, you can attach the strap between the tuners on your 8 string.

pritch
03-31-2017, 08:23 PM
I have both and would not consider either to be a disadvantage. If there is a button on the heel? Good. If there isn't? Good.

Rrgramps
04-02-2017, 04:04 AM
I also have both. New and lesser played ukuleles have the strap tied at the headstock between tuners. However, I install heel buttons on my favorite ukuleles. I prefer playing with the heel location, because I'm very sensitive to having my fretting hand touch anything, let alone a strap. Especially when playing cowboy chords by the nut. My arthritic thumb can't press the back of the neck, and it bumps into a headstock secured strap. Never would I tie it near the nut; just asking for frustration. It's gotta go to the space between tuners, or I'm going to be cussing. LOL

When sitting, I don't always use a strap; unless it feels more comfortable to elevate and/or anchor the ukulele. Kind of a belt and suspenders sorta thing, I guess. My flea is especially slippery, and I'm not using a strap on it even when standing -- just haven't gotten around to it yet. It's not that bad to hold strapless, but I'm sure to change my mind once it gets its proper strap. May compromise and try the clip on, but it will be cockeyed due to the round, waistless body. Can't let go of it either, or the Uke will flip. LOL

I'm also sensitive about having long sleeves brushing the strings on my picking hand.

Mahalo Mike
04-04-2017, 01:58 PM
Hi zztush - straps definitely are an anatomy dependent item. I think the reason I have a hard time holding a soprano as a female is not an issue found with most males.

My sister had a problem as she was physically maturing while learning to play the accordion - I can still hear her yelling "Ow!",
"SOB!", whenever she compressed it.