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ChuckBarnett
04-03-2017, 09:22 AM
I have had this chunk of wood for some time. Think I got it out of a scrap bin at Woodcraft in Seattle. I think it is ebony. ??
990579905699058

From what I can gather ebony is a good choice dor a bridge. I also see that uke bridges dont utilize pins and holes.

I welcome any help. :-)

saltytri
04-03-2017, 09:42 AM
Yes, ebony is a very good choice for a bridge. Make sure that the grain is pretty much vertical. There are various theories about the importance of a particular angle of grain in a bridge. You can google it for interesting reading but if you make sure that the grain is close to vertical you ought to be OK. Good luck with your project!

Allen
04-03-2017, 10:40 AM
I have had this chunk of wood for some time. Think I got it out of a scrap bin at Woodcraft in Seattle. I think it is ebony. ??
990579905699058

From what I can gather ebony is a good choice dor a bridge. I also see that uke bridges dont utilize pins and holes.

I welcome any help. :-)

Uke bridges come in every sort of size and shape that you could imagine, as well as every method of string attachment. Mine use pins or string through. I really don't like the tied off ones as on classical style guitars and gave up using them years ago.

sequoia
04-03-2017, 05:40 PM
It is notoriously hard to look at a piece of wood of unknown origin and identify it even for experts and I'm no expert. Whatever it is, it sure looks hard and dense from the pictures and would make a wonderful bridge. Just because a piece of wood isn't "ebony" or "rosewood" doesn't mean it isn't good bridge material. Whatever the wood is it should have a pleasant ringing noise when you tap it.... Just as a wild guess it looks to me like that superhard South African black wood stuff (Dalbergia melanoxylon) which is a type of "ebony" not just the type of "ebony" that people think of.

Beau Hannam Ukuleles
04-04-2017, 04:02 AM
This could also be African blackwood, which is actually a rosewood. But regardless, it would make a ncie bridge.

Tenor
04-04-2017, 05:49 AM
I imagine this subject has been discussed before, but just as a reminder/heads-up, one might Google “wood allergies and toxicity,” or something similar, to see potential hazards that are associated with certain woods.

Mutantmoose
04-04-2017, 07:14 AM
I would cut the blank, rough it out, and then wait a couple of weeks. I've made banjo bridges out of solid ebony (great damping effect) and they have ended up twisting a lot. You want to see what your piece does before gluing it on.

ChuckBarnett
04-05-2017, 11:01 AM
Excellent advice! Thank you.

ChuckBarnett
04-05-2017, 11:02 AM
Wise words that I'll pay some attention to. Thanks.

ChuckBarnett
04-05-2017, 11:03 AM
Thank you for that spot. Now i am curious to see how it works.

ChuckBarnett
04-05-2017, 11:05 AM
I appreciate this forum and those who take time with nubes like me! :-)

ChuckBarnett
04-05-2017, 11:09 AM
Uke bridges come in every sort of size and shape that you could imagine, as well as every method of string attachment. Mine use pins or string through. I really don't like the tied off ones as on classical style guitars and gave up using them years ago.
What is it that you dislike about the other style? I may need to a decision as to which way to go here. Thank you.