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View Full Version : Machining a body on the cnc



Bonanza Pete
04-21-2017, 07:31 AM
I build my ukes a bit different. I machine my tops and bottoms on the cnc leaving the kerfling as part of the top and base. Then I attach the sides.

Here is a video of a top being machined out. This was from a live broadcast on Facebook so you will hear me responding to questions.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8qmn7GceX7c&feature=youtu.be

Bob Orr
04-21-2017, 08:08 AM
Interesting but you will have a lot of short grain sections and end grain glue joints that would not be a strong as traditional kerfing strips. Is that a bridge plate you have left proud? If yes then again this should be cross grained with the top for strength. Cheers, Bob

Bonanza Pete
04-21-2017, 08:25 AM
Interesting but you will have a lot of short grain sections and end grain glue joints that would not be a strong as traditional kerfing strips. Is that a bridge plate you have left proud? If yes then again this should be cross grained with the top for strength. Cheers, Bob

Bob, thanks for your comments. The sides provide the cross grain support. And the bridge gets a thin strip over it. So far after about 80 of them I'm not running into any issues. Hope I'm right.

Pete

RPA_Ukuleles
04-21-2017, 09:18 AM
CNCs are cool, but wow seems wasteful. You could have built half-dozen uke tops out of that slab.

Bonanza Pete
04-21-2017, 10:09 AM
Rodney, I understand where you are coming from. For me it is a tradeoff between labor and materials. 1 1/3 bf at 6.40 a bd ft. Lets say 10.00. Unless you have a thin kerf saw (which I don't) capable of a 16TH inch cut and cutting the wood 1/16th thick you may get 6 pieces. But lets say you can. Each piece would then cost 1.67 plus processing time. then you would need to take another piece for the kerfing to buy or make. Very doable. Just doesn't work for me.
Lot's of ways to do things. I have been self employed as a woodworker for over 30 years. To lazy to get a real job i guess. (Insert smiley here) I love building ukes but it is just part of my business and as such needs to pay it's way.

Now if I was using premium woods that were quite expensive the numbers would change. Then your method would make total sense. Black walnut is the most spendy wood I use at this point. My customers keep coming back for more so I am happy.

Again, thanks for your suggestions. Still learning.

Michael Smith
04-21-2017, 02:43 PM
Making a lot of nice sawdust.

RPA_Ukuleles
04-22-2017, 09:59 AM
For me it is a tradeoff between labor and materials.

I get it BP, and thanks for a thoughtful response. I think I said it because I don't really think of anything as plentiful these days. And certainly high-tech can have a way of leaning towards waste. Disposable everything.. But, I still want a CNC !

Bonanza Pete
04-23-2017, 06:29 AM
But, I still want a CNC !

Rodney, go for it. I built mine, a 5 x 10 table, in 28 days. You would find lots of use for it.

Next thing I need to invest in is a 3D program so I can carve necks.

ksquine
04-24-2017, 07:24 AM
You and Ken are making me really want a CNC router. Must Resist!!

Bonanza Pete
04-24-2017, 08:05 AM
You and Ken are making me really want a CNC router. Must Resist!!

Resistance is futile.
Check out mechmate.com and build your own.

DPO
04-24-2017, 03:14 PM
Well I watched the video, but I don't know that it's for me. If I had to resort to that sort of machine I think I would give up woodwork. If it works for you then more power to you, but not for me.

Pete Howlett
04-30-2017, 12:23 AM
Would you see a use for making your banjo-uke pots Dennis? Ours is used for repeat operations that require absolute precision like string pin holes and saddle slots in bridges for example.

DPO
04-30-2017, 11:15 AM
Would you see a use for making your banjo-uke pots Dennis? Ours is used for repeat operations that require absolute precision like string pin holes and saddle slots in bridges for example.

Probably not Pete, as I can't see me using it for anything else. However I am seriously looking at getting a lathe to turn the pots on, hand shaping the pots on a bobbin sander has lost it's glamour.

Pete Howlett
04-30-2017, 12:24 PM
Ooh er Dennis. You could make a simple faceplate lathe using a motor and pully fixed to it as a faceplate which is all you would need. Talk to Ken. I am sure he could work it out. Failing that, Mathias Wandell has his own idea about lathe buidling. All the best. Me, I'd make up a year supply of pots and then hire some workshop time with an engineering lathe.

Timbuck
04-30-2017, 09:24 PM
Here's another video "not banjo ukulele pots" but similar stuff .. very interesting if you are a machinary nerd like me...(I think this thread has drifted off course a bit):rolleyes:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8CpkHMavvvU

Bonanza Pete
05-01-2017, 02:25 AM
Thanks for sharing this video Timbuck. Very interesting to me.
CNC is just another tool in our shops. Takes the drudgery out.