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ripock
05-28-2017, 07:43 PM
Can someone give me an authoritative or at least orthodox definition of what the campanella style entails? By context, I can adduce that it is some fingerstyle technique, but what are the details?

kypfer
05-28-2017, 09:08 PM
No doubt others will chime in (pun intended!)

Basically the concept involves taking advantage of the re-entrant tuning of the ukulele, enabling one to use alternate strings for successive melody notes thereby allowing each individual note to "ring out" for as long as possible.

This also implies that each individually fretted note should be kept fretted for as long as possible, only moving the finger to it's new position at the last possible moment.

The system is probably most easily implemented on the shorter scale instruments, where a wider range of notes is available within one hand-span.

There are probably some other fine details for others to fill in.

Hope this helps in the meantime :)

:music:

Old Boy
05-28-2017, 09:26 PM
Here are a few samples ... German only, but the videos are your friends :)

http://www.ukulele-arts.com/lernen/solo-crashkurs/lektion-2-campanella-technik/

ukatee
05-29-2017, 01:25 AM
There are some good threads and resources on the forum:

Guide to Campanella style (http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?123396-Guide-to-Campanella-Fingerstyle&highlight=campanella)

Free downloadable Celtic Campanella (http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?122653-Celtic-Campanella-Book-2&highlight=campanella)

I love the effect but I'm not very good at it. I love Camsuke's Campanella Waltz (http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?107352-Campanella-Waltz-Tab&highlight=campanella) but there are still a couple of bars that catch me out - I hold down the fingers as much as possible to sustain the sound and then lift the wrong one.

ripock
05-29-2017, 04:30 PM
Thanks everyone. It is now clear as a bell. Coincidentally I had ordered a CD of John King's music, which hasn't arrived yet, because a jazz guitarist with whom I correspond thought it would be up my alley. My docket is already too full with clawhammer, travis picking, etc...but I will definitely keep this in mind. At the very least I think I will have to play arpeggios with it.

Nickie
05-29-2017, 05:15 PM
ripock, you might also enjoy Samantha Muir's YouTube videos

Graham Greenbag
05-29-2017, 11:46 PM
Try this link https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Yee0W0N4Atk

It seems to me that Samantha has two different YouTube names with one centred towards guitar and the other uke.

Ukecaster
05-30-2017, 05:43 AM
Here are a few samples ... German only, but the videos are your friends :)

http://www.ukulele-arts.com/lernen/solo-crashkurs/lektion-2-campanella-technik/

The clear tone of the Bruko sounds perfect for that style of playing.

Nickie
05-30-2017, 05:15 PM
It certainly does. A high quality soprano uke is exactly what is called for to play this style. Not having one though, forces me to stick to playing it on my concert uke, which seems to work very well for it.

stevepetergal
05-30-2017, 05:33 PM
...the concept involves taking advantage of the re-entrant tuning of the ukulele, enabling one to use alternate strings for successive melody notes thereby allowing each individual note to "ring out" for as long as possible...


You've been given good answers to your original question, but this is a bit misleading. The re-entrant tuning gives the ukulele player one additional tool for playing campanella style. Campanella can be played just as well with a linear tuning. Some of us play this style with both types of tuning. Remember, campanella is a guitar technique adopted by us ukulele players.

kypfer
05-30-2017, 09:15 PM
You've been given good answers to your original question, but this is a bit misleading. The re-entrant tuning gives the ukulele player one additional tool for playing campanella style. Campanella can be played just as well with a linear tuning. Some of us play this style with both types of tuning. Remember, campanella is a guitar technique adopted by us ukulele players.

Thank you for that insight. I admit I was unaware of this technique being used on guitar ... I'll bear it in mind :rolleyes:

wwelti
09-02-2017, 11:53 AM
It is not true that campanella technique is a guitar technique adopted by the ukulele.

Campanella technique was used long before the classical guitar existed. In fact it was used on instruments that were very similar to the ukulele. Some of them were even tuned in GCEA tuning just like the "modern ukulele". There are even roughly 500 years old tabs for those instruments which can be directly played with the ukulele.

Best Regards
Wilfried

Debussychopin
09-02-2017, 04:29 PM
Don't use campanella for the sake of campanella. It doesn't work musically for every type of music piece. That's where John king got it wrong sorry.

ripock
09-02-2017, 05:34 PM
Since initiating this thread, that has been my conclusion as well. Currently I consider it an adornment such as legato, pizzicato, or trills. It works where it works. It is kind of like cinnamon: a little bit enhances the flavor, but too much makes it bitter and unpalatable. On a practical level, the one place that campanella seems to contribute to my style is in playing scales and modes. Since scales/modes span across all strings (or,at least, 3 strings in re-entrant tunings) it is a nice effect to use the cross-resonances of the appealing pealing bell sound of campanella by going back and forth between strings. It really breaks up the scale and makes it sound more musical and less linear.

Booli
09-03-2017, 01:01 PM
Don't use campanella for the sake of campanella. It doesn't work musically for every type of music piece. That's where John king got it wrong sorry.

Would you be so kind as to elaborate on King's mis-application of campanella?

I'm not trying to be difficult, but if such an issue exists, I'd like to become aware of it so as to avoid contributing to the problem myself.

A video or sound sample would help to clarify, if possible to add one to a written description.

Thanks in advance. :)

Booli
09-03-2017, 04:43 PM
... (http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/27/arts/music/27king.html?mcubz=3)Campanella is but one path to this goal there are plenty of others. If you don't like King's arrangements, maybe you will be able to publish some books and videos of your own arrangements which get the same recognition as we see recorded in this obituary?

Thanks for that info and link Bill.

I am not experienced enough yet with campanella to have a qualified opinion as to what he did wrong, or did right, and merely just beginning to study his technique and arrangements via:

https://www.fleamarketmusic.com/store/ProdImages/John%20King%20bk-lrg.jpg

https://www.fleamarketmusic.com/store/Scripts/prodView.asp?idproduct=170

Which I am happy to use as a starting point, even if other folks consider him to be less than an optimal example of this style of playing.

I am ignorant of why one would avoid his techniques, and that was why I had asked the above question in my other post.

While it has not happened yet, I would caution other folks to not speak ill of the deceased, even if only out of respect for their contributions which might be esteemed by other folks. We all have our likes and dislikes and opinions can be expressed without putting down anyone or anything. Kindness is all that is required.

ripock
09-03-2017, 04:56 PM
I just wanted to clarify my ambiguous post above. I wasn't agreeing that King had got it wrong. I was agreeing that campanella, like everything else, has a time and place. I have King's book, as well as Tony Mizen's, on campanella. As beautiful as those arrangements are, I had to admit that they don't apply to what I'm trying to do. That's all.

Booli
09-03-2017, 06:54 PM
There are merits to all of your guys points above, but why does everything have to be absolutely either/or or all-or-nothing?

By default, I reject dogma and doctrine, and once I understand John King's style I will pick and choose how to use it FOR MYSELF and not according to the rules of some magisterium.

I have no intentions of joining an orchestra or symphony where they impose a hard discipline upon the musicians in the ensemble.

My music is for me, and I really dont care about 'the rules' as long as it makes a pleasing sound, and by golly that usually follows along with the study and application of Music Theory...unless one's intention is to create dissonant music, and do something completely different...

Nobody has to be 'wrong' here for all of us to find joy in the application of various techniques.

If mis-information is being distributed, we can have a civilized discussion, which I would prefer, and elevate the level of knowledge without anyone feeling slighted.

Thanks for reading, I will now step down from the soap-box. :)

Debussychopin
09-03-2017, 11:22 PM
Would you be so kind as to elaborate on King's mis-application of campanella?

I'm not trying to be difficult, but if such an issue exists, I'd like to become aware of it so as to avoid contributing to the problem myself.

A video or sound sample would help to clarify, if possible to add one to a written description.

Thanks in advance. :)

I rather explain verbally than try to type out my thoughts and what I know about music theory (both piano and guitar, and I'm sure for most western music and instruments) p m me

Ziret
09-04-2017, 06:01 AM
Would you be so kind as to elaborate on King's mis-application of campanella?

I'm not trying to be difficult, but if such an issue exists, I'd like to become aware of it so as to avoid contributing to the problem myself.

A video or sound sample would help to clarify, if possible to add one to a written description.

Thanks in advance. :)

I'd like to know this, too.

Nickie
09-04-2017, 08:49 AM
It is not true that campanella technique is a guitar technique adopted by the ukulele.

Campanella technique was used long before the classical guitar existed. In fact it was used on instruments that were very similar to the ukulele. Some of them were even tuned in GCEA tuning just like the "modern ukulele". There are even roughly 500 years old tabs for those instruments which can be directly played with the ukulele.

Best Regards
Wilfried

Wilfried, I didn't know this. Thank you. Your videos on YouTube are absolutely fabulous!

Booli, I love it when you use words like "magisterium", it's so sexy! It's a lot snazzier word than "bullsh-t"!

Tootler
09-08-2017, 11:03 PM
The Renaissance Guitar was roughly the size of a tenor ukulele and had seven strings in four course. It was typically tuned gGCCEEA with the G strings in octaves.

I use basically that tuning on a 8 string ukulele for accompanying myself singing songs from (mainly) 17th century broadsides.
As far as I know, no actual examples of Renaissance guitars have survived so modern makers have to depend on pictures. They seem to go for a slightly longer scale length than a tenor uke but not as long as a baritone. The proportions of the Renaissance Guitar are different with a longer body and shorter neck. From the pictures and examples I've seen they seem to have just eleven frets to the body. The body join is where the twelfth fret would be but as the frets were strips of gut tied round the neck it wasn't possible to place one there.
I believe music for them has survived but in much smaller quantities than for the Lute. As with the Lute, the surviving music is in the form of tab

Chopped Liver
09-09-2017, 01:01 AM
The Renaissance Guitar was roughly the size of a tenor ukulele and had seven strings in four course. It was typically tuned gGCCEEA with the G strings in octaves.

I use basically that tuning on a 8 string ukulele for accompanying myself singing songs from (mainly) 17th century broadsides.
As far as I know, no actual examples of Renaissance guitars have survived so modern makers have to depend on pictures. They seem to go for a slightly longer scale length than a tenor uke but not as long as a baritone. The proportions of the Renaissance Guitar are different with a longer body and shorter neck. From the pictures and examples I've seen they seem to have just eleven frets to the body. The body join is where the twelfth fret would be but as the frets were strips of gut tied round the neck it wasn't possible to place one there.
I believe music for them has survived but in much smaller quantities than for the Lute. As with the Lute, the surviving music is in the form of tab

That sounds like a cool guitar!

OhioBelle
09-09-2017, 04:52 AM
The Renaissance Guitar was roughly the size of a tenor ukulele and had seven strings in four course. It was typically tuned gGCCEEA with the G strings in octaves.

I use basically that tuning on a 8 string ukulele for accompanying myself singing songs from (mainly) 17th century broadsides.
As far as I know, no actual examples of Renaissance guitars have survived so modern makers have to depend on pictures. They seem to go for a slightly longer scale length than a tenor uke but not as long as a baritone. The proportions of the Renaissance Guitar are different with a longer body and shorter neck. From the pictures and examples I've seen they seem to have just eleven frets to the body. The body join is where the twelfth fret would be but as the frets were strips of gut tied round the neck it wasn't possible to place one there.
I believe music for them has survived but in much smaller quantities than for the Lute. As with the Lute, the surviving music is in the form of tab
This is fascinating! Ever since discovering the sound of campanella, I've been practicing it on my sopranos. The short scale allows me to span more frets with my short fingers. Last night, I decided to try campanella on my Cocobolo tenor and wow! The sound is more rich and harp-like than I would have imagined.

But...

It's harder to reach all those frets! LOL! Having one finger on the first fret and another on the fifth is quite the challenge. I'll keep working and stretching. I'm determined! Now knowing that the original renaissance guitar was closer to a tenor, I am even more inspired.

Chopped Liver
09-09-2017, 04:57 AM
Yeah, I like the sound better on my tenor, too! And interestingly (is that even a word?!), I find the tenor easier to hold than the smaller ones. But the finger stretch is a little harder.

OhioBelle
09-09-2017, 06:32 AM
Yeah, I like the sound better on my tenor, too! And interestingly (is that even a word?!), I find the tenor easier to hold than the smaller ones. But the finger stretch is a little harder.

Agree on the "easier to hold" aspect of the tenor. I have developed tendonitis (tennis elbow, aka ukulele elbow!) from gripping the soprano, even with a strap. The tenor can rest on my lap.

It's all about keeping that neck stable so you can place your fingers precisely where they need to be to get the pure tone. My next plan is to try it on my baritone with the re-entrant strings I ordered from Southcoast.

gilles T
10-06-2017, 07:49 AM
Hello,

Just to add an important historic information : the music for renaissance guitar never calls for the campanella style. Some baroque music use extensively campanella scale, because the baroque guitar is re-entrant (actually, there are four ways of stringing it) when the renaissance guitar is mainly linear (the couple of high G and low G lets you play some high notes on the last string, but it's almost impossible to pluck only one string without sounding the low G).

Regards,
gilles