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Rllink
07-03-2017, 04:22 AM
One thing that I am interested in is how many people who start out playing the ukulele stick with it. How many stay with it a month, two months, a year, two years? A neighbor got inspired to play the ukulele, ran out and bought one right away, then played it for all of two weeks before she lost interest in it. I gave my sister-in-law a Waterman because she wanted to play the ukulele and I don't think that she ever picked it up after she got it home. Her daughter got all excited about learning to play it this summer. That lasted for about three or four day, then she found other things that she wanted to do this summer. I would have to say that everyone who I have introduced to the ukulele has quit. So kudos to everyone here who has stayed with it. I suppose that is why we are all still here.

Anyway, on the same note, whenever a tread gets resurrected from the beginner forum or uke talk, and I do not recognize the name of the OP, I go back and see when was the last time they posted anything. More often than not, they post for a month or two and then they are gone. I wonder where they go? Do they lose interest in the ukulele and quit? Do they just lose interest in UU but continue to play their ukuleles? Are they just passing through and are they still on their journey? Are they still here, lurking and reading, just not participating? I just wonder about it. I'm actually surprised that I'm still playing it.

Booli
07-03-2017, 04:36 AM
Interesting and good idea for a thread Rollie! :)

I dunno what happens with the drive-by forum users - maybe they get distracted by something shiny and are pulled away from here?

As far as the short-lived hands-on interest, I think with kids, everything is variable when they are young, and tenacity might be a quality that they do not yet possess...whereas with adults, I could speculate wildly, but I think we just have SO MANY distractions, that it's a miracle any of us are able to make a habit of anything at all past a certain age (I'll be 49 next yr if that means anything)...

I stick with it because I've played guitar in one form or other, nearly my whole life since I've been 7 yrs old, and then started ukulele in 2013, and these fretted intruments have been my therapy and my touchstone that have kept me relatively sane, especially lately, even if only to keep me inside the eye of the storm while the chaos around me spirals out of control...

What I often wonder and am dismayed about, is that when I started here on UU, there were already some 'old-timers' in terms of being on UU for years before me, and in 4 yrs, many of them are no longer posting here nor making YT videos...likely some of them as 'elders' have moved on to the Rainbow Road, but what of those that are still ticking?

Where are they? Why are they no longer active? A quandry indeed.

Croaky Keith
07-03-2017, 04:45 AM
Well, the ukulele did become fashionable for a while - but I think most just don't participate on the forum once they have learned how to play it.

I have no problem with that, they are free to do what they like.

Myself, my interest in my harmonicas over whelmed my uke interest, & I've been away mostly learning to play them just these last few months, but I'm still around in the forum, though I haven't participated in the Seasons as much as I was doing, hopefully I can do both once I'm comfortable with my harmonicas. :)

Rllink
07-03-2017, 04:52 AM
I guess that over a lifetime I have started any number of things only to find out that I wasn't really as interested in them as I thought that I would be. Or it leads to something else. That's why I say that I'm surprised that I've kept up with the ukulele for as long as I have. I mean, I'm not blaming anyone for moving on to something else. But I agree with Booli, when I first came here there were some big time posters who had been at it for a long time, and several of them have disappeared. But with them, I figure that they just out grew us? I know that there is not way to even determine a statistic for the number of beginners who don't get past the beginner phase before they give it up?

UkerDanno
07-03-2017, 04:53 AM
Almost 6 years now, since I got my first uke and 5 years in a club. The club environment really got me into playing, just by jamming with the group. Now, jamming once a week with my original Sun City Ukulele Club and playing my U-bass once a week with another casual group. Can't imagine quitting...

BTW, welcome back Booli! Where have you been?

bariukish
07-03-2017, 04:56 AM
The beautiful wife and I decided to try ukuleles about 5 1/2 yrs ago when we gave up on guitar. Not only have we stuck with it, our frequent "ukulele happy hour" is the highlight of many of our days. The old familiar songs and a frosty malted beverage or two make for many smiles and a brief respite from the many challenges of the " golden years". I think this time spent with our ukes does alot more for our health than all the Rx drug that our Doctors prescribe.

greenie44
07-03-2017, 05:04 AM
I can respond based on my own personal experience.

I started coming here to find used ukes. After a bit, I came across the Seasons, and spent a couple of years making videos every week. During that time, I came to know some of the Seasonistas personally, which enhanced my interactions here.

After maybe 3 years, the Seasons weren't doing it for me any more. They mainly got me good at getting a video out of a song in a couple of days. I felt like I had that down and wanted to do more, so I curtailed my participation there.

I still check in occasionally, but, like so many other things, it is sometimes surprising how easy it is to give up something. A couple of decades ago, I was an extremely dedicated baseball fan. My friends at the time all knew this and assumed it would never changed. It did. My team got lousy, the game deteriorated (in my mind), I had less free time, and now I could not even tell you what place my longtime team is.

It does take a bit of a commitment to participate here, and there are any number of things that drive people away. So people cycle in and out. BTW, I asked a similar question in a thread about four years ago, so this is nothing more than a cycle.

And Booli, "relatively sane"? It's all in the eyes of the beholder now, isn't it? :drool: Seriously, good to see you here again.

Rllink
07-03-2017, 05:04 AM
I have my one and only ukulele student that I talk about here on occasion. Her mother asked me how many hours a week, or how many minutes a day, she should be practicing. I told her that if she is practicing to the hands on a clock, maybe she isn't as interested in playing the ukulele as we are in making her play the ukulele. Perhaps we should just see if she will pick it up and play it on her own. She has been at it for three months now, but I think mom and dad are pushing her a lot.

Rllink
07-03-2017, 05:18 AM
I can respond based on my own personal experience.

I started coming here to find used ukes. After a bit, I came across the Seasons, and spent a couple of years making videos every week. During that time, I came to know some of the Seasonistas personally, which enhanced my interactions here.

After maybe 3 years, the Seasons weren't doing it for me any more. They mainly got me good at getting a video out of a song in a couple of days. I felt like I had that down and wanted to do more, so I curtailed my participation there.

I still check in occasionally, but, like so many other things, it is sometimes surprising how easy it is to give up something. A couple of decades ago, I was an extremely dedicated baseball fan. My friends at the time all knew this and assumed it would never changed. It did. My team got lousy, the game deteriorated (in my mind), I had less free time, and now I could not even tell you what place my longtime team is.

It does take a bit of a commitment to participate here, and there are any number of things that drive people away. So people cycle in and out. BTW, I asked a similar question in a thread about four years ago, so this is nothing more than a cycle.
.
Everything cycles through. There are only so many questions to ask, and only so many topic to discuss. I had a year or so that I was the same as you with football. I think that it is just human nature to get tired of something and move on. My friend got interested in woodworking thirty years ago. He is still woodworking. It is his life and the only thing he talks about. He is stuck in woodworking and can't seem to escape. He is anomaly. But I used to only have time for one thing. The rest of the time I was working and raising kids. Now I'm retired and I have plenty of time, so I share my time with with various other activities. Maybe that is why I haven't lost interest.

SoloRule
07-03-2017, 05:30 AM
I am told some "old timers" have moved to Facebook

mikelz777
07-03-2017, 07:14 AM
I've been playing the uke for 5+ years and just bought a new uke so my plans are to stick with it. I still really enjoy playing it and there still things I want to do and learn on the ukulele. I'd like to learn finger- picking. I'd like make videos and join in on the seasons. I think it might be fun to be part of a ukulele group though my one time participating in one was a mixed bag. My playing time waxes and wanes from 2-3 times a month on the low end to almost daily on the high end.

Participation or non-participation here could be due to almost anything and may or may not reflect on if or how often someone plays their uke. I used to be an active participant on a jazz forum for several years which corresponded with the many years I was collecting jazz CDs. After many years, I amassed over 1000 jazz CDs and it got to the point (finally!) that I wasn't really interested in acquiring any more. I had more than I could listen to and if I discovered someone new or new to me, I almost certainly already had many CDs of the same or very similar music. I still participated in the forum and listened to jazz but I wasn't really buying CDs any more. After a while, the forum became a lot of samey-ness. The same topics would keep rolling around, older members would leave, some always seemed to be a regular source of irritation and the influx of new members would inevitably bring in the same kind of questions without fail. My leaving the forum was a combination of boredom with the same old thing again and again and a loss of burning passion when I reached a saturation point. I wasn't getting much out of it any more and I didn't have a lot of desire for seeking out opportunities and imparting the wisdom I had acquired on a regular basis so my participation waned and eventually died out. There are probably many people out there who experience something similar with the ukulele.

lfoo6952
07-03-2017, 07:19 AM
One thing that I am interested in is how many people who start out playing the ukulele stick with it. How many stay with it a month, two months, a year, two years? A neighbor got inspired to play the ukulele, ran out and bought one right away, then played it for all of two weeks before she lost interest in it. I gave my sister-in-law a Waterman because she wanted to play the ukulele and I don't think that she ever picked it up after she got it home. Her daughter got all excited about learning to play it this summer. That lasted for about three or four day, then she found other things that she wanted to do this summer. I would have to say that everyone who I have introduced to the ukulele has quit. So kudos to everyone here who has stayed with it. I suppose that is why we are all still here.

Anyway, on the same note, whenever a tread gets resurrected from the beginner forum or uke talk, and I do not recognize the name of the OP, I go back and see when was the last time they posted anything. More often than not, they post for a month or two and then they are gone. I wonder where they go? Do they lose interest in the ukulele and quit? Do they just lose interest in UU but continue to play their ukuleles? Are they just passing through and are they still on their journey? Are they still here, lurking and reading, just not participating? I just wonder about it. I'm actually surprised that I'm still playing it.

All of the above. Other reasons are:

1. One must be passionate about music in order to stick with it. Believe it or not, not everyone is passionate about music. Some see a ukulele as a novelty, and quickly lose interest.
2. There are very few musical heroes for today's generation. In the 60's and 70's, we had an explosion of musical heroes to give us inspiration.

Down Up Dick
07-03-2017, 07:22 AM
I'm still here, but I don't play ukulele much any more. I'm an ol' dog, and I just couldn't easily learn the new tricks. I'm mostly a melody guy and always have been. I was struggling mostly with the chords and tabs. Trying to read the tabs and play the correct chords correctly and read the words just stopped being fun, and that's what I was after.

And then I tried playing the banjo--voila!--problems solved. Irish banjo and mandolin is chordless, and I just read the music but don't sing. Folk banjo has easy chords, few keys, and I can handle the tabs. I haven't sung with it yet, but I will and play my harps too. However, I do still noodle around with my ukes and sing a few songs that was able to learn well enough.

I still struggle some and get down when I'm not making enough progress but playing now is mostly fun. :old:

janeray1940
07-03-2017, 07:52 AM
I don't post nearly as often as I once did, mainly because I don't have the downtime that I formerly had and when I do have downtime now, I'd prefer to use it either to play, or to get outdoors. I don't see myself ever going away from UU entirely - I continue to learn things from peoples' posts and I like that once in a while I have some insight that I can share to help a beginner out.

As for the notion of going away after "learning to play" - I've played steadily for 8 years now, taken lessons nearly all of that time, and *still* don't feel as if I've "learned" to play. Maybe it's just me, but I don't think "learning" an instrument has an actual end point. There's always more to learn!

player
07-03-2017, 08:02 AM
I regret I didn't get an uke decades ago, now it happened in april. Would be surprised if I'm not here 10 years from now. Not always playing and posting, but it IS there.

Croaky Keith
07-03-2017, 08:08 AM
Then there is the time when your progress plateaus, some people give up then, others struggle on, me, I try something new, by that I mean something uke oriented.
I may not be good but I try, then when I am not progressing, I try something else.

My main interest is the melody, the main interest of people on here seems to be singing with uke as accompaniment, so I give that a go now & again.

I was 'challenged' to write a song for one of the Seasons, now I will occasionally write some words, throw some chords at it, record it, & make the Seasonistas suffer it, (or not, their choice to listen or avoid). :)

I actually came to music in my retirement as a challenge to learn to play an instrument, the uke has helped me achieve that goal, (but it was my third choice instrument).
Now I'm transferring what I have learned here over to my harmonicas, & am also progressing with learning to read music (from the page).
It will all gel together & increase my enjoyment.

ksiegel
07-03-2017, 08:20 AM
I don't post as often as I did, nor do I do the weekly Seasons video all the time - Life got in the way. It has also kept me from getting to my monthly uke groups on occasion, or from the monthly Open Mic I attend.

But I still play at home, have a few Farmers market gigs (every 4-6 weeks in the summer, and every 6-8 in the winter), try to get together with friends, and play at special events at my wife's yarn shop - and played recently at the Celebration of my late Mother-in-law's life. (Only fitting - my first Public Performance was at my late Father-in-law's memorial service...)

My friend Carrie, who I met here on UU and told me about the local uke group, hasn't been picking up her uke too often, because she's picking up textbooks, and working two jobs. her son Adam, a tremendous violinist, has started to play, however, and while not on UU, he has just gotten ukulele #3. His older brother used to play with me at Farmers' Markets (on guitar); I'm going to see if Adam wants to join me on Uke, Violin, and possibly guitar & vocals soon... Of course, then I'll have to learn the music that a 17 year-old wants to play (which is not necessarily a bad thing, just... different.)

Carrie looks forward to playing more when her stress levels drop down to Nuclear range...



-Kurt

Rllink
07-03-2017, 08:49 AM
All of the above. Other reasons are:

1. One must be passionate about music in order to stick with it. Believe it or not, not everyone is passionate about music. Some see a ukulele as a novelty, and quickly lose interest.
2. There are very few musical heroes for today's generation. In the 60's and 70's, we had an explosion of musical heroes to give us inspiration.

I was going to argue with you as far as the passionate about music, because I don't consider myself passionate about music. But after I thought about it a little, I got to thinking that I really enjoy singing and entertaining people with music, so I guess that I am.

bacchettadavid
07-03-2017, 11:00 AM
Before I begin, let me say that I assume that player who leaves UU quits was seeking to advance on the uke. There are so many reasons an individual may cease to participate in a forum, but this limit allows me to develop a response more fully.

Furthermore, I assume that the student in question was hoping to perform instrumental music beyond comping cyclic chord progressions before they quit. If you are a UUer who primarily plays accompaniment while singing or who is content to strum along at ukulele society meetings, I apologize for this post's potentially condescending tone. Please know that this is not intended by design but merely a product of my grievances about the general state of music in popular society.

As a lifelong musician (mostly woodinds, ukulele in the last two years), I've watched many of my peers begin to learn an instrument only to quit before reaching a level of proficiency which they found intrinsically rewarding. I don't have good statistics on this, but I'd venture a guess that perhaps 60% to 80% of people who begin to learn an instrument either drop it completely or play so infrequently as to sabotage their chances for improvement. I suspect yet more people who purchase an instrument with the intent to play never acquire even basic facility. DISCLAIMER: I don't believe the numbers above apply to all instruments. I'm sure many less popular instruments boast lower attrition rates.

I definitely agree that passion plays a role; however, I think of passion as the product of intelligent commitment that arises in the wake of initial excitement, for I can't think of single seemingly innate interest of mine that lasted for more than a few months without intensive nurturing on my part.

I'll try to summarize why I think players quit. The ukulele, with its shallow initial learning curve and relative mechanical simplicity, offers ways to circumvent many of these reasons, but its approachable nature can also lead many players to run headlong into their first wall without the proper equipment to scale it.

1. Poor instrument quality and setup. Many instruments marketed to beginners receive inadequate setup and/or are constructed from substandard materials with shoddy workmanship, and many self-taught ukulele players are unlikely to even realize the need for a proper setup.

2. Lack of training (mostly in how to practice and listen). Few ukulele beginners outside of Hawai'i (and perhaps Canada?) are members of dynastic musical traditions. These self-taught players sometimes attempt to cobble together practice and listening habits drawn from a variety of sources on their own, resulting in inefficient, possibly even detrimental, habits in their approach to and practice of music.

3. Long hiatuses away from the instrument. I'm guilty of this one on occasion. Whether for a summer or a week, one quick way to undermine your progress is to fail to reinforce the (good) habits gained through practice. The occasional and earned sabbatical can be a wonderful respite which resolves bad habits by allowing them to fall into disuse before before offering a fresh perspective, but the discipline that should be exercised when resuming play is often absent.

4. Inappropriate repertoire. I feel that this is a big one on the ukulele. Graded repertoires with clear learning objectives are rare (at least in the United States), and tools like these can be invaluable for self-learners.

5. Too few performances (whether private or public). Few of us are tossed into the crucible of performance or rehearsal often. This creates a lack of discipline which can in turn breed a (sometimes subtle) lack of confidence. Preparation for performance (and the implied reward upon finishing a good performance) are important for the development of competent students in any endeavor, and music is no exception.

6. Plateaus, particularly the one separating advanced beginners from intermediate players. Without formal musical instruction (not so much uke-specific as pertaining to music in general), relatively few people are equipped to overcome this hurdle. See 2, 4, and 5.

7. Pain and general aggravation. Poor technique, lack of physical conditioning, and vagaries of biology can all cause this one. In addition to discouraging regular practice, they can also limit a player's potential. The ukulele is less susceptible to this than most instruments, but when present, these issues can disinvest new ukers.

Booli
07-03-2017, 11:24 AM
@bacchettadavid -

I think you've made some good points above, I'm not sure if I agree exactly with everything you said, and maybe I'm not qualified to offer a meaningful counterpoint, but at least for me, you've provided fertile food for thought.

Mahalo and shaka. :)

acmespaceship
07-03-2017, 01:24 PM
... I'll try to summarize why I think players quit. The ukulele, with its shallow initial learning curve and relative mechanical simplicity, offers ways to circumvent many of these reasons, but its approachable nature can also lead many players to run headlong into their first wall without the proper equipment to scale it...
Great post. I think few people in the mainland USA approach ukulele with the commitment they give to, say, piano or violin. The school marching band does not need uke players. On the good side, this means few kids feel railroaded into practicing ukulele. On the bad side, beginners don't know how to make progress. Getting onto the ukulele path is easy. Buy a uke and an instruction book. And then... what? Most of us don't have specific goals or anyone to push us forward. Meanwhile, we are busy people with other things competing for our attention.

Ukuleles are not the only things abandoned. All those guitars and saxophones. Woodburning sets. Tennis rackets. Watercolor paints. Yarn. This is not only a 21st Century problem, though it is fun to blame iPhones for short attention spans. People have always dabbled in things that seemed interesting at first but didn't work out. I don't really think of this as a tragedy. It would be far worse to never try anything new.

I teach beginner juggling workshops. There's always somebody who asks if I think everybody can learn to juggle. I say yes, but... some people get it faster than others (and there's no predicting who) and some people are more determined. At some point, if it takes too long and you're not motivated to practice, then no, you will not learn to juggle. Not because you can't, but because you choose not to invest the time. Which is perfectly OK and entirely rational.

IMHO we sabotage beginners when we keep telling them uke is easy. People try playing for a few weeks, get discouraged and conclude they have no talent. There must be a happy medium between promising instant success and prescribing a years-long instructional plan.

bacchettadavid
07-03-2017, 02:21 PM
Ukuleles are not the only things abandoned. All those guitars and saxophones. Woodburning sets. Tennis rackets. Watercolor paints. Yarn. This is not only a 21st Century problem, though it is fun to blame iPhones for short attention spans. People have always dabbled in things that seemed interesting at first but didn't work out. I don't really think of this as a tragedy. It would be far worse to never try anything new.

First, thank you for reading my wall of text. I was tempted to mention iPhones, operant conditioning, and delayed gratification in my post, but I thought better of it. My text wall was already rant-y enough. :deadhorse:

Re: saxophones and marching bands. I suspect any marching band that competes with varied non-athletic student clubs struggles to retain its members for more than a couple years. As testament to this fact, I have a dozen saxophones from area schools in need of light repair before the new school year (the students opted to drop band in favor of another activity). I don't think of this as a tragedy, just a reflection of the fact that choice breeds restlessness even as it offers up objects of passion.

I guess what I was trying to express in my rant was that, in the case of musical instruments, commitment is insufficient. The serious approach to violin and piano is undergirded by an enormous support network of teachers and pedagogical organizations, peers, tutor texts, repertoire, recitals, and professional incentives. This support structure simply doesn't exist for ukulele players, and as a result, many players who DO attempt to take the instrument more seriously (like rural pianists and violinists) run into unnecessary "d'oh!" moments and frustrating, demotivating roadblocks.

I believe retention is a collective effort. If we (the ukulele community in general) were better organized, new players might have an easier time coming to grips with the instrument.

Rllink
07-03-2017, 02:54 PM
Great post. I think few people in the mainland USA approach ukulele with the commitment they give to, say, piano or violin. The school marching band does not need uke players. On the good side, this means few kids feel railroaded into practicing ukulele. On the bad side, beginners don't know how to make progress. Getting onto the ukulele path is easy. Buy a uke and an instruction book. And then... what? Most of us don't have specific goals or anyone to push us forward. Meanwhile, we are busy people with other things competing for our attention.

Ukuleles are not the only things abandoned. All those guitars and saxophones. Woodburning sets. Tennis rackets. Watercolor paints. Yarn. This is not only a 21st Century problem, though it is fun to blame iPhones for short attention spans. People have always dabbled in things that seemed interesting at first but didn't work out. I don't really think of this as a tragedy. It would be far worse to never try anything new.

I teach beginner juggling workshops. There's always somebody who asks if I think everybody can learn to juggle. I say yes, but... some people get it faster than others (and there's no predicting who) and some people are more determined. At some point, if it takes too long and you're not motivated to practice, then no, you will not learn to juggle. Not because you can't, but because you choose not to invest the time. Which is perfectly OK and entirely rational.

IMHO we sabotage beginners when we keep telling them uke is easy. People try playing for a few weeks, get discouraged and conclude they have no talent. There must be a happy medium between promising instant success and prescribing a years-long instructional plan.Making progress, or the lack there of, has been mentioned twice. An interesting concept in itself. I think that a lot of people can't measure progress because they don't know where they are going in the first place. How do you know if you are getting there if you don't know where it is? I think much of the problem is that people set themselves up for failure, by trying to win in some way, something that can not be won. Playing the ukulele is not a sport. You don't finish. Do you ever get done learning how to play the ukulele? It is a lifetime of learning? I always find it interesting that so many people need some sort of quantification and labeling process to measure their progress toward something that doesn't even exist. When they come to the realization that they can't ever win they stop trying. When I use a sports analogy to tell people what playing the ukulele is all about, I tell people that it isn't a 10k where you try to cross the finish line with a personal best each and every time you go out, it is more like yoga, where you make a long term commitment to your well being.

In regards to all those other instruments, and the support, or lack of support, for them. There is a saxophone, a trumpet, a violin, a keyboard, and an old guitar in my basement. All instruments that my kids were going to learn to play, either pressured into, or because they thought that it sounded fun until they started doing it.

TopDog
07-03-2017, 10:18 PM
It's been around ten years for me since I first got
my hands on a soprano, and I think I am getting the
hang of it! I simply enjoy the range and versatility of
the little beasts, and nothing could put me off my love
for them! But as in the previous posts, I have friends
'think they will give it a shot' but somehow, never get
around to it!

SailingUke
07-04-2017, 04:50 AM
I still play everyday. The uke never seems to get old for me. I have played guitar for 50+ years. I rediscovered the uke 10 years ago. I can't imagine life without music. I still read the new posts on the forum, but I don't post as much as I used too. I am here to help anyone with a question though.

Joyful Uke
07-04-2017, 08:33 AM
Anyway, on the same note, whenever a tread gets resurrected from the beginner forum or uke talk, and I do not recognize the name of the OP, I go back and see when was the last time they posted anything. More often than not, they post for a month or two and then they are gone. I wonder where they go?

I don't post as often these days due to technology issues. For some reason, my computer can't access this site at all anymore. (It's very old, so old OS and software.) I can read this site on my tablet, but not log in. Not sure why that is. It's not a password problem.

I am able to log in on the device I'm using right now, but don't know that I should go buy one of my own just for this purpose....

But, as others have mentioned, we can have so many demands on our time that sometimes participating in a forum has to take a lower priority.

Just a couple reasons that people who are still playing ukulele might not be as active here.

Croaky Keith
07-04-2017, 08:52 AM
You should be able to log in from any computer, old software may have security risks if used for anything particularly important, like banking, but I wouldn't call forums particularly important. :)

Joyful Uke
07-04-2017, 09:05 AM
You should be able to log in from any computer, old software may have security risks if used for anything particularly important, like banking, but I wouldn't call forums particularly important. :)

I can't access UU at all from my old computer. There must have been some change in the set up here? I just get a message that the connection was reset. No change in a firewall or anything on my end, unless my ISP made some change. (Could be, I suppose.)

I have no idea why I can read UU from my tablet but not log in, but that's the case there.

It all works from the device I'm using now, so I know I've got my password correct.

I don't do banking or other sensitive stuff online, so that part doesn't worry me.

Tudorp
07-04-2017, 01:31 PM
I been on the forum for awhile, and used to post a lot, because I felt I had more to contribute. After a stroke, and limitations on projects I used to work on, just felt I didn't have as much to contribute. I am a life long musician myself, and been playing the uke for some time now, and even though I can not play as I used to, I still do. My youngest (daughter) is also a life long musician, and has played guitar since she was 7 (now 20), but since she been out of school for 3 years now, and now on her own, I don't get to spend the time with her playing as we used to, even though we do every so often. Life has been fast for her and she doesn't play as much as she did. She used to be surgically connected to her guitar, as it was rarely out of her hands, but adult life for her she realizes she has life to live along side of her music. We relocated recently and I do not have the exposure to kids as much as when she was young, that I used to enjoy spending time with teaching to play like I did where we lived and where my daughter went to school. So, basically, life changes, and as it does, changes things. But, that doesn't mean we gave up on music, it just means we have to share our time with other things as well. As for myself, I do stop by and read, lurk here, but again, rarely post. But I do pick up my uke and play several times a week, usually just tinkering around with it by myself, and wife.

Nickie
07-04-2017, 02:36 PM
"Well, the ukulele did become fashionable for a while....."
I assume you are talking about your own experience. The ukulele is as popular here as ever, and is gaining new beginners every week. TBUS is still growing, events are still being added.
I think that some of the attrition in Ukulele World is due to the fact that people are looking for the next bigger, better, shinier object. We're basically an unhappy lot.
Why?
Because, from my perspective, we are selfish. If I was just playing ukulele for myself, I think I'd have quit by now. I started playing because I wanted a hobby, but more than that, I wanted to make other people feel better.
This burning desire has pushed on me gently but persistently. The more I play for others, the more I enjoy the ukulele.
I've forced myself to overcome horrible stage fright. This little girl who was afraid of her own shadow is now considered outgoing by her peers.
Starting a jam session was hard. It's still hard leading it. Playing in a group is easier, and gives me the feeling of being part of a team, which is going to help me in my business.
This just isn't for everyone. It certainly isn't going to appeal for very long to a person who doesn't give a hoot about others, or improving her playing.
The people that hang around are caring, considerate folks who make time to be here and feel and share in the sense of community.
There are only 4 or 5 out of over 1400 of our club's members who bother with UU. Go figure.

Papa Tom
07-04-2017, 03:44 PM
Great question and great premise for a thread.

I am one of those former newbies who got all excited about the uke when I first realized I could play it pretty well without a lot of effort. I had been a professional drummer and applied my knack for cool rhythms to it, so early on, I sounded like I knew what I was doing. I couldn't put it down for a long time, and I soon owned four, including a "pocket-sized" one to play in my car.

Then I heard a few other guys play - most notably, former guitar players who could REALLY get around the instrument. Pretty much cut me down in my tracks. Then a year or two went by and I had no motivation to get any better. Then my grandchildren reached the age where they would no longer sit and watch me play, but would immediately want to grab the instrument from me and start banging it over a chair for laughs.

Before long, my ukes were all sitting either in cases or on couches around the house, getting picked up mostly while I waited (and waited and waited) for my wife to get ready to go out somewhere. I'm still pretty good with it, but I find myself playing the same handful of chords and licks over and over.

The uke served a need for me when I finally started yearning to make music again after about ten years retirement from the music business. It gave me an excuse to go into music stores again, learn lifelong favorite songs on a new instrument, and participate in forums like this one. After several years as a member of UU, I still visit and browse every once in a while, but I have nothing new to say, no desire to learn about and/or buy different types of ukes, and VERY little to add to the discussions going on here.

Lastly, as I have found out the hard way on another (unrelated) forum I used to frequent, when you run out of productive things to say and you force yourself to participate anyway, somewhere along the line you are going to lower your standards, get lax with your self-sensoring, and start offending people unintentionally. So, while I still love the uke, these days I choose not to talk about it so much!

fitncrafty
07-04-2017, 05:50 PM
I joined this forum back in 2010 or so. I started to play the ukulele and continue to learn as I go. I went back to school, not once but twice, back to work and now through some big family stuff so lots of changes over the years. I can't say that I have not been consistent with it all the time, and I have not progressed as I wish. Though, I still find a lot of joy in strumming away. I do not have as much time to visit the forums, though I have connected with many members and stay in touch via other platforms too. So yes, for me, still plucking away.

Choirguy
07-04-2017, 06:44 PM
There are a lot of forks in this conversation...and I have been tempted to respond to a few of them in an agresssive way. I think I am overtired as we decided, on a whim, to drive down and see the Iowa Cubs and the fireworks show in Des Moines last night, and to drive back the same night. We got back to our home in the suburbs of the Twin Cities just short of 4am and didn't quite get a full night's rest.

As for activity on the forums, I haven't been posting as much because fewer conversations are of interest to me. I'm not saying they are not interesting...just not my thing. And to be honest, I had one bad interaction with a UUer that is still sticking with me, and comes to mind every time I read one of their posts. As a middle school teacher, I am anything but over-sensitive, but I find it interesting how one exchange with one person can taint your view of a larger thing. That's probably a good thing for me (and all of us) to keep in mind in our own lives as well.

There has been a hint lately of a condescending tone towards people that "just" strum and sing. I would hope that isn't the case, as getting together to strum and sing is a central part of all of the ukulele jams I have attended and seen online. Furthermore, strumming inevitably leads to other things, such as playing with chord melody, finger picking, etc.

I am in the process of expanding my own abilities, learning other chord positions, playing chord melodies, and finger picking. But I am a singer (could you tell from my user name?) and it seems to me that the people who sneer a bit at strummers can't actually sing that well themselves. So what I am saying is that there ought to be space for all of us to do whatever we want on these little boxes (Have you seen the Bacon Brothers video?)

Finally, just a reminder that there is an ARMY of young players out there who could care less about "This Land is My Land" or your version of "My Ukulele Gently Weeps." They are seeking instruction to play the music they want to play on YouTube, which is why John Atkins (The Ukulele Teacher) was able to quit his job and spend his whole life making ukulele videos.

And also don't forget that Ukulele Underground's purpose is to foster the next generation of ukulele players...

I teach ukulele to over 370 students a year...they don't really have a choice in the matter. But I can tell you that about 30-40 run with it (about 10%), and another 40% learn the basics well enough to be able to pick up the instrument again in the future.

Rollie, I commend you for your work in helping others to learn the instrument...don't take their loss of interest personally. Teach them the basics, try to make it fun, and give them the ability to come back to it on their own in the future...whether we are talking about kids or adults.

This past week, a small group of us performed for some vets at the vet home, and one of the activity directors who had been there two weeks ago had gone out, bought a ukulele, learned a few chords, and played along with us on a few songs. How great is that? That is what it is all about.

fitncrafty
07-04-2017, 07:28 PM
"Carrie looks forward to playing more when her stress levels drop down to Nuclear range..."

Carrie, has been excitedly playing my lovely Koaloha daily for the last five days. Doesn't make me much better than I was, but I have sure had fun. Amazing what five days off from work can do to a girls attitude! :) And playing time!



-Kurt[/QUOTE]

70sSanO
07-04-2017, 10:07 PM
I been on the forum for awhile, and used to post a lot, because I felt I had more to contribute. After a stroke, and limitations on projects I used to work on, just felt I didn't have as much to contribute. I am a life long musician myself, and been playing the uke for some time now, and even though I can not play as I used to, I still do. My youngest (daughter) is also a life long musician, and has played guitar since she was 7 (now 20), but since she been out of school for 3 years now, and now on her own, I don't get to spend the time with her playing as we used to, even though we do every so often. Life has been fast for her and she doesn't play as much as she did. She used to be surgically connected to her guitar, as it was rarely out of her hands, but adult life for her she realizes she has life to live along side of her music. We relocated recently and I do not have the exposure to kids as much as when she was young, that I used to enjoy spending time with teaching to play like I did where we lived and where my daughter went to school. So, basically, life changes, and as it does, changes things. But, that doesn't mean we gave up on music, it just means we have to share our time with other things as well. As for myself, I do stop by and read, lurk here, but again, rarely post. But I do pick up my uke and play several times a week, usually just tinkering around with it by myself, and wife.

Tudorp,

Good to hear from you again. I remember your projects and your daughter's love for the guitar. Sorry to hear about your stroke. I'm glad to hear you still play. Hang in there and God bless.

John

70sSanO
07-04-2017, 10:24 PM
I've been playing the ukulele for 10 years after a lot of years playing guitar. I don't post as much as I used to, but I play often... daily in spurts and then once or twice a week or so at other times.

I have been playing fingerstyle melodies for almost as long and the easiest way to get out of a rut is to hear a song and then go and see what is out there. Sometimes I just work the melody from the chords and sometimes I'll search YouTube to find an arrangement or two, three and pirate from them to put the basic song together. I'll modify or add as I work through it.

For the most part I have committed everything to memory, so there are some songs that I forget and they fall by the wayside. Occasionally I'll try to go through as many songs in one session as I can remember. For me it is really about havng fun and keeping it simple. I have no desire to make significant improvements, just want to maintain what I have and keep adding songs.

John

Debussychopin
07-04-2017, 11:05 PM
Try playing classical repertoire transcribed for the ukulele on a soprano. That's what I solely practice. Classical guitar fingerpicking technique on a small fretboard.

It is a challenge and that's what pushes me onto uke. Other than that I have no other interest in it. The occasional forum visit, may be I'm compelled to post. I used to be all into a uke brand and collection and trying out different makes. You know what, I'm more interested in developing skill on a laminate makala than just strum on a kamaka.

Also, piano is my main passion. Everything about it.

good_uke_boy
07-05-2017, 03:28 AM
@Choirguy: beautiful post.

Tenor
07-05-2017, 04:51 AM
<snip>



This past week, a small group of us performed for some vets at the vet home, and one of the activity directors who had been there two weeks ago had gone out, bought a ukulele, learned a few chords, and played along with us on a few songs. How great is that? That is what it is all about.

Thank you.

greenie44
07-05-2017, 04:58 AM
As for activity on the forums, I haven't been posting as much because fewer conversations are of interest to me. I'm not saying they are not interesting...just not my thing. And to be honest, I had one bad interaction with a UUer that is still sticking with me, and comes to mind every time I read one of their posts. As a middle school teacher, I am anything but over-sensitive, but I find it interesting how one exchange with one person can taint your view of a larger thing. That's probably a good thing for me (and all of us) to keep in mind in our own lives as well.

I get this exactly. It's not necessarily such a big thing in itself, but it puts some brakes on coming back so often, which sometimes is the first step to withdrawing completely. You visit less, you find it doesn't make a difference, and you visit even less.

And great point about repertoire. One of the biggest reasons I initially got involved here more was that I could pick songs that were not essentially associated with uke, do them for a Seasons, and have people not say "That is so crazy" but either "Cool - a Television song" or, even better yet, "I didn't know that artist, but it sounds good." That's still the reason I sometime contribute.

I guess as people and their lives evolve, their choices include using this forum differently or dropping away. I will say that I have met some absolutely wonderful people through UU, and, for that, I am deeply grateful.

Uk3player78
07-05-2017, 06:23 AM
Interesting to read the 'Just strummers' view highlighted by choirguy. I hadn't noticed this. I always felt ukulele players were void of competition. Sort of an ex guitar player, a player since my teens and keeping one as a just in case, I thought that was limited to the guitar world. You know, how many guitarists does it take to change a lightbulb? One to change it and four to say they could have done it better. Play what makes you happy I say. It's a happy instrument.

Me? I started ukulele in 2011. I quit playing for a year as I re kindled my interest in guitar but I'm back for good. Hobbies come and go and with it the forum interest goes.

Down Up Dick
07-05-2017, 08:32 AM
WARNING: pissy post

I'm mostly a "play for myself" type because the music I like is too passť for most other people (even the nursing home crowd) to want to listen to, no matter how well performed. I have no interest in playing the music which everyone else plays nowadays, which is what I'd have to do if I joined a group. I also have a low tolerance for first position hell and sour tunings, among other annoyances. I'm surprised I haven't abandoned ukes by now, returning to the other instruments I've been neglecting; instead I seemed to have grown a bit fixated on them.

The approach I'm now taking to the uke, stressing relative patterns, is too different from the usual approach for most learners, so my attempts to discuss aspects of it here mostly get no reaction, or just the typical "we don't need no steenking theory" hostility. So many UUers have neglected picking up the rudiments of music that discussions end up pitched to the lowest common denominator—hard to address anything much beyond the basics with that limitation.

I've considered starting a site or blog for my meatier outpourings, to explore topics with a progressively prepared, more engaged audience, where the information would remain organized and easily found. But I don't foresee a personal payoff commensurate with the effort. Time to play more and write less!

So I'm now mostly content to be a lurker, a passive consumer, using the forum to keep abreast of new developments in gear, scanning the Seasons for songs I might like to learn, occasionally picking up a tip or two, and trading messages one-on-one without flak from the peanut gallery. When the mentor bug strikes, I usually quash it myself—I've been told often enough, "We don't need to know that." Alrighty, then.

Very understandable, pithy post, ubu, and, I agree with you that playing one's favorites is the best part of music. :old:

Rllink
07-05-2017, 09:01 AM
I teach ukulele to over 370 students a year...they don't really have a choice in the matter. But I can tell you that about 30-40 run with it (about 10%), and another 40% learn the basics well enough to be able to pick up the instrument again in the future.

Rollie, I commend you for your work in helping others to learn the instrument...don't take their loss of interest personally. Teach them the basics, try to make it fun, and give them the ability to come back to it on their own in the future...whether we are talking about kids or adults.

Thank you for the kind words Chris. I've been cast into this role, as you know, and I wish that they would find a real ukulele instructor, but I guess I'm as good as they can get right now. Seriously, I was quite surprised when the mother of my one paying student called and said that they could not find anyone else. I keep asking around for them, in the hopes that I can pass her off to someone who might be better suited as a teacher, but so far I haven't found anyone for them either. Anyway, this afternoon I had her here for a lesson and I plugged my uke into a guitar amp, cranked in some reverb, a little extra sustain, and some echo, then let her wail away at it. She left wanting to come back for more. I promised her that if she learned how to play "One Toke Over The Line" loud and clear by next week, that we could crank up the volume enough to blast her mother out of the room and chase her upstairs. Here's hoping. But at least for my student, I think that taking lessons is what keeps her going. The knowledge that every week she is going to come to my house and I'm going to have her show me what she has been working on all week is part of her motivation.



Interesting to read the 'Just strummers' view highlighted by choirguy. I hadn't noticed this. I always felt ukulele players were void of competition.
I've heard it said often times, especially by pickers and grinners, "if all you want to do is strum and sing three chord songs that's fine, but it you want to go beyond that, you need to do this or that." I always felt that inferred that one does not have to be very proficient to strum and sing songs. I actually used to take a bit of offense to that early on, but after a while I decided that people who do not strum and sing are living in a whole different world than I am and have no idea what I'm doing and what it takes to do it. Besides, it isn't any harder to play a four chord song than it is to play a three chord song, so right there shows that they don't know what they are talking about.;)

Rllink
07-05-2017, 09:16 AM
WARNING: pissy post

I'm mostly a "play for myself" type because the music I like is too passť for most other people (even the nursing home crowd) to want to listen to, no matter how well performed. I have no interest in playing the music which everyone else plays nowadays, which is what I'd have to do if I joined a group. I also have a low tolerance for first position hell and sour tunings, among other annoyances. I'm surprised I haven't abandoned ukes by now, returning to the other instruments I've been neglecting; instead I seemed to have grown a bit fixated on them.

The approach I'm now taking to the uke, stressing relative patterns, is too different from the usual approach for most learners, so my attempts to discuss aspects of it here mostly get no reaction, or just the typical "we don't need no steenking theory" hostility. So many UUers have neglected picking up the rudiments of music that discussions end up pitched to the lowest common denominator—hard to address anything much beyond the basics with that limitation.

I've considered starting a site or blog for my meatier outpourings, to explore topics with a progressively prepared, more engaged audience, where the information would remain organized and easily found. But I don't foresee a personal payoff commensurate with the effort. Time to play more and write less!

So I'm now mostly content to be a lurker, a passive consumer, using the forum to keep abreast of new developments in gear, scanning the Seasons for songs I might like to learn, occasionally picking up a tip or two, and trading messages one-on-one without flak from the peanut gallery. When the mentor bug strikes, I usually quash it myself—I've been told often enough, "We don't need to know that." Alrighty, then.I think that you underestimate the appreciation for your contributions. You shouldn't let a few snarkers stop you from sharing.

Debussychopin
07-05-2017, 09:37 AM
Try playing classical repertoire transcribed for the ukulele on a soprano. That's what I solely practice. Classical guitar fingerpicking technique on a small fretboard.

It is a challenge and that's what pushes me onto uke. Other than that I have no other interest in it. The occasional forum visit, may be I'm compelled to post. I used to be all into a uke brand and collection and trying out different makes. You know what, I'm more interested in developing skill on a laminate makala than just strum on a kamaka.

Also, piano is my main passion. Everything about it.

Oh , i like classical guitar too forgot to mention.
Can't be jus strummin on that ya know, lol

Joyful Uke
07-05-2017, 10:31 AM
There has been a hint lately of a condescending tone towards people that "just" strum and sing. I would hope that isn't the case, as getting together to strum and sing is a central part of all of the ukulele jams I have attended and seen online. Furthermore, strumming inevitably leads to other things, such as playing with chord melody, finger picking, etc.

I fingerpick, but wish I could strum and sing. I'm definitely not a singer, no matter how much I might want to be, and my fingers, after some injuries, limit what I can play, so many chords are out.

We might not all be playing the same styles or going in the same directions, but the reasons are many, (far beyond just what I mentioned), but I don't think I've seen people with a condescending tone towards any particular approach. Maybe I missed those posts, though, since I've been having technology issues on my end.

Glad to hear that you played for some vets. I'm sure they enjoyed it.

Graham Greenbag
07-05-2017, 01:10 PM
I think that you underestimate the appreciation for your contributions. You shouldn't let a few snarkers stop you from sharing.

I vote for what Rllink said above. OK music theory is something I normally find dry, difficult, baffling and boring; however if someone takes the time and trouble to try to post something useful about it then those that complain instead of just passing the topic by must surely be 'plonkers' and their comments near worthless.

Nickie
07-06-2017, 06:08 PM
They came to Clearwater! We just had over 20 beginners in a free workshop, then 20 more advanced beginners in the 2nd workshop, in one evening. And it was way under promoted.

bunnyf
07-07-2017, 11:47 AM
Ubelele, I always enjoy your posts. The longer I play, the more I get out of them. I respect all the different paths that ukulele folks take. To each his own. Some folks want to dive deeper. Some want to splash about. Often folks will come back to the info when they reach a point where they feel a need for the info. It's like Booli's tech posts. Mostly they're over my head, but sometimes you come to a point where you need to know and how great is it that someone with that expertise shares solutions with you. That's the great thing about UU. You can enjoy it on whatever level you are at. I also get inspiration from watching other people playing, like the seasonistas. They expose me to music I may have forgotten or genres that I had not previously been exposed to. A tip here, a tip there, can lead you to places you never expected.

Rllink
07-07-2017, 11:51 AM
Oh , i like classical guitar too forgot to mention.
Can't be jus strummin on that ya know, lolThat sort of touched my funny bone, because it was my friend's classical guitar that scared me into playing the ukulele instead.:D

Teek
07-08-2017, 08:55 PM
That sort of touched my funny bone, because it was my friend's classical guitar that scared me into playing the ukulele instead.:D

I started on classical in my late teens, never learned much beyond a few etudes, arpeggio patterns, and how to read a treble clef. I tried picking it back up a few times in my late 20s.

In 2008 I discovered ukulele and was in love with the entirety of the instrument. However I was living in a situation where I took a lot of grief for being happy about playing my ukes (and actually any little thing that made me happy got me stomped on). My mom let me play her Martin bari, but back then there wasn't much in the way of tabs that I was interested in for baritone, and she said I couldn't put GCEA tuning strings on because then she couldn't play it, but she never played it and seldom played her violins. I got so much grief for buying a soprano, a concert and a tenor because I wanted a shorter scale in standard tuning. She was also angry that I put her bari in a really nice hard case instead of the old original chipboard case, because it was valuable, and also earthquakes. Crazy people are so difficult.

When I moved the stress to pay rent put me in a job that had me at a keyboard 10 hours a day, so as much as I wanted to play more, it hurt! so I couldn't get up much momentum, but at least I enjoyed the forum. Then all the cool kids started leaving, and it wasn't as warm and fuzzy feeling. I lost a lot of my joy with ukulele for a lot of reasons, and went to Facebook to play stupid games and eventually took up guitar instead, since I realized I really wanted to play steel string acoustic, and I had switched to a better job and also made more money.

Then my mom died and everything I wanted to do took a back seat to cleaning up all the fallout from executing an estate for over a year, plus massive grief. Ukuleles still held little interest for me, even my guitars didn't sway the grief much and I'm studying acoustic blues, go figure.

I think life just keeps happening, not always so much in a good way for people, and they have to prioritize, and forum use is eliminated. Or people lurk for some distraction, but don't have the inclination to post.

I just renewed my UUU subscription, mostly to help the guys, and I have a couple of good ukes to try to get back to playing when my hands need a break from long scales and steel strings. I'll be selling off the rest on Craigslist this summer.

I really enjoy all the guitar forums, people are nice there, and I have yet to run into anyone making fun of ukulele, and I recognize a lot of old UU forum names in AGF, UMGF, etc., lol. But I use them for research or reference instead of social connection, like right now I'm looking for an OM cedar over rosewood Bedell with a cutaway. But I figure my time is better spent actually studying theory and technique and playing my instruments, instead of talking about playing them.

Sano and Tony and Booli and Kurt and Nickie and Marielle, great to see you posting!

Rllink
07-09-2017, 02:56 AM
A friend of mine retired and took up classical guitar, and when I retired he tried to get me to take it up as well. So I dug out my wife's guitar and hung around with him and his classical guitar friends for month or so. But after a month I decided that they called classical guitar a discipline for a reason. I'm to old for discipline, so I took up the ukulele instead.

Booli
07-09-2017, 03:33 AM
I started on classical in my late teens...

In 2008 I discovered ukulele and was in love with the entirety of the instrument....

Sano and Tony and Booli and Kurt and Nickie and Marielle, great to see you posting!

TK,

Thanks for telling your story. I wondered why you had not been on UU much over the past year.

I've missed reading your posts. I always learned something from your comments.

Sorry for your troubles. It's nice to see you posting again too, and thanks for the kind words. :)

Booli
07-09-2017, 03:37 AM
A friend of mine retired and took up classical guitar, and when I retired he tried to get me to take it up as well. So I dug out my wife's guitar and hung around with him and his classical guitar friends for month or so. But after a month I decided that they called classical guitar a discipline for a reason. I'm to old for discipline, so I took up the ukulele instead.

Ha Ha - that reminds me of the joke of folks traveling down the road, and when they came to a fork in the road that said "bear left", (ba-dum-bum) - They went home....

Not that you gave up Rollie, so please dont take it the wrong way, I was alluding to quite the opposite - I've always enjoyed reading your comments here and glad that you are still here on UU. :)

Nickie
07-09-2017, 03:36 PM
Welcome back Teek! Glad you're overcoming.
I've missed your posts.

Debussychopin
07-09-2017, 05:48 PM
A friend of mine retired and took up classical guitar, and when I retired he tried to get me to take it up as well. So I dug out my wife's guitar and hung around with him and his classical guitar friends for month or so. But after a month I decided that they called classical guitar a discipline for a reason. I'm to old for discipline, so I took up the ukulele instead.

Ukulele is a discipline too I'm sure you already know. And there are some things on uke that is more difficult than done on classical guitar. I'm sure you know that already too. :)

Rllink
07-10-2017, 03:48 AM
Ukulele is a discipline too I'm sure you already know. And there are some things on uke that is more difficult than done on classical guitar. I'm sure you know that already too. :)Yes, I'm sure that it is, if that is what you want it to be. I think however that the ukulele has a much broader application than classical guitar does. Anyway, I have a lot of fun playing the ukulele. I wanted to be able to play songs like Five Green and Speckled Frogs for kids, Sixties and seventies rock around the bon fire with my neighbors on summer evenings, and protest songs for my old retired hippie friends. It isn't that I thought that Classical guitar was not worthy or too much for me, it is just that classical guitar does not really lend itself to that.

Anyway, back to the original point of the thread, there were a number of people here when I first started who were out doing lots of gigs or busking, posting pictures of themselves and their equipment, talking about it, and most of them have moved on. They were actually applying their music and their talents, and that was the direction I wanted to go as well. I was getting a lot from their posts. I miss that. I realize that for many, their interest comes and goes and comes back again as life and other interests gets in the way. But the people I'm talking about were so involved with what they were doing that I find it hard to think that they just gave it up, so I wonder where they are now? Did they just decide that forums were not their thing? Did they find another forum to contribute? Did they start their own web pages? Did they all move to facebook, as someone suggested? Are they still here but have decided not to post anymore? I'm just wondering.

bunnyf
07-10-2017, 08:59 AM
Rllink, I think forum interest can wax and wane as life gets in the way. I think they are still out there doing their ukulele thing, but just don't feel the urge to post. For me, it's like uke group participation. I sometimes tire of it. Playing songs I don't like much for the most part. When I've had enough for a bit, I take a sabbatical and hunker down and focus on my personal uke interests. So I'm still actively ukeing, just not participating in a particular aspect.

Inksplosive AL
07-18-2017, 02:53 PM
*fights way from dark odd closet*

Somewhere in the back of a strange very large closet with all the missing socks is where they all go...

*heads back to dark closet with large wheel of cheese*

Croaky Keith
07-18-2017, 10:19 PM
I seem to remember that name, used to post regularly when I first joined up here, hope all is well with you. :)