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jnorris235
08-08-2017, 10:18 AM
Just wondering if a ukulele played on the space station would sound lower due to lower gravity (hence low g). Pressure is the same in there, but gravity is a tiny bit lower. Maybe lower in the vomit comet where they simulate zero g. Chris Hadfield would know if ukuleles for Mars, or in La Paz (lower pressure) would need to be tuned differently!

ralphk
08-08-2017, 10:34 AM
little late for April 1 submittal

jnorris235
08-08-2017, 10:43 AM
I know. Didn't know where best to ask it but a luthier would know. Nevertheless it is a serious question, the physics of it interested me.

jnorris235
08-08-2017, 12:16 PM
Fascinating article. Will read at length tomorrow. Sound moves faster in martian air because it is less dense, and so also in La Paz. Gravity may have no effect. Neither may affect pitch but will study.
Interested that sound is actually measured in Bels!

Ukecaster
08-08-2017, 12:48 PM
Fascinating article. Will read at length tomorrow. Sound moves faster in martian air because it is less dense, and so also in La Paz. Gravity may have no effect. Neither may affect pitch but will study.
Interested that sound is actually measured in Bels!

So, it will sound like I can play faster than my turtle hands can actually go? ��

Booli
08-08-2017, 10:32 PM
so, it seems that hertz are fastest in a vacuum

if a uke is strummed deep in the forest with nobody to hear it, does it make any sound?

if at the event horizon of a black hole can you hear the ukulele sound, or is it sucked into the singularity?

is there a doppler effect?

does the pitch increase since the sound waves are moving faster as they approach the black hole?

maybe some astronaut can test and report back, after all Neil Armstrong played the uke in the Apollo capsule...

neo1022
08-09-2017, 12:22 AM
It's probably not dependent on gravity, but rather, on the partial pressure of oxygen and nitrogen aboard the station. As far as I know, the atmosphere on the ISS is 101.3 kPa (14.7 psi); the same as at sea level on Earth. Moreover, the balance of nitrogen and oxygen are roughly the same...