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Ukulelerick9255
08-21-2017, 05:18 PM
Let the opinions begin....I need a ukulele to take places like the beach where I'd never take my Beau Hannam custom uke. So here's the question....you have $500 to spend on a tenor uke, what are you buying? Just a couple of things that are preferences....gloss finish, slotted headstock, and not a fan of Mahogany....none of these are deal breakers. No laminates that's a deal breaker. Let the suggestions begin. Electronics would be nice but not necessary as I will be playing it outside mostly anyway.

quiltingshirley
08-21-2017, 06:25 PM
I've found my Blackbird tenor is great. It's carbon fiber so no moisture problems and stays in tune. It's more than $500 but you might look for a used one. It sounds good no matter where I'm at. Sounds like you might be looking for wood.

Choirguy
08-21-2017, 06:37 PM
How about an HPL laminate instead of a traditional laminate? After buying the Enya EUR-X1, I'd certainly recommend the Enya X1 Tenor Ukulele or $140, with electronics, from Amazon. Then save up the left over $360 towards the next ukulele.

Brad Bordessa
08-21-2017, 08:17 PM
You must live a pretty plush beach lifestyle. Personally, I don't really see the point of a beach uke that's less than waterproof these days. Rain: check. Sand: check. Saltwater: check. Careless want-to-tryers: check. It won't sound as good or probably play as good, but boy, to just chuck it around without worry is a joy.

I'm pretty thrilled with the durability of my Outdoor uke. It's not perfect and I hope that they continue to evolve their line of products, but for $150 it's a cool piece of gear. It went 6km around NZ with me this past month and a half in the back of my van. No case on the plane or in the car.

RafterGirl
08-22-2017, 01:40 AM
My Bonanza HPL concert is my outdoor uke. Strapped on my whitewater raft or packed inside my sea kayak. It survived a week long rafting trip with three teenage girls playing it a few weeks ago. It's sturdy and fun to play. Has it's own unique sound that I'm getting to love more & more as I play it. To me personally, a $500, solid wood ukulele would never go to the beach.

DownUpDave
08-22-2017, 02:11 AM
As Raftergirl said the Bonaza has a body made from HPL which is not effected by moisture, its counter top material. They now have a Corian finger board, think Magic Fluke plastic finger board with internal frets but made from Corian. Even though the neck is wood the corian fingerboard and frets will always remain stable. Bazmaz at Gotauke just did a review.

I understand wanting an all solid wood great souding and playing uke for the out of doors but the actual beach is a bitch on instruments, sand gets everywhere, like in the tuners. I had a Pono pro classic cedar and macassar ebony as a travel uke. I took it car camping many times, but never to the beach. It lived in its hardcase when not being played so I did baby it, couldn't just toss it around and drop it on the ground or in the sand.

If you are set on what you have specified just keep looking on the Market place for something used and a bit banged up.

Rllink
08-22-2017, 04:41 AM
In my experience, and my beach ukulele has spent plenty of time on the beach, is not the wood, but the tuners. You can wipe rain and sand off of most any Uke, but the salt air plays hell with the tuners.

robedney
08-22-2017, 05:20 AM
Hmm... Rlink raises an excellent point. Got to ponder tuners for my play anywhere design. Echoing all of the above, there are a host of good options made these days for beach use. You might want to reconsider your solid wood criteria. In any case you're going to want to keep it out of direct sun when not being played. A gig bag is fine for that -- but not a black one (it's an oven). Also, no metal zippers -- they die an early death in a marine environment.

Rllink
08-22-2017, 08:54 AM
Hmm... Rlink raises an excellent point. Got to ponder tuners for my play anywhere design. Echoing all of the above, there are a host of good options made these days for beach use. You might want to reconsider your solid wood criteria. In any case you're going to want to keep it out of direct sun when not being played. A gig bag is fine for that -- but not a black one (it's an oven). Also, no metal zippers -- they die an early death in a marine environment.
This is what they look like after four years. They are still working though.
102518102519102520

The wood is fine. No problems there, despite rain, wind, and sea spray.

RafterGirl
08-22-2017, 09:46 AM
My Bonanza will be 99% around fresh water, but good head-up on the tuners. Near lakes or rivers it can get pretty damp in the mornings. I'll keep an eye on them

Choirguy
08-22-2017, 09:48 AM
I wonder if someone makes aluminum tuning heads? Are Gotoh's? Also...Rollie...did you ever say what you are going to buy? And are you coming up for the fall ukulele day with Lil' Rev in November? With school starting back next week...looks like this summer slipped away from me.

SailingUke
08-22-2017, 09:52 AM
I just got an Ohana TK70R. Rosewood laminate body with a solid spruce top.
Street price is about $180. This a super uke and nice to look at too. Plays like a dream.
It is a great take anywhere uke for any level of player. I also believe this is a super starter uke, as it will keep a beginner challenged until UAS sets in. I use my Blackbird Clara at the beach on a regular basis.

Rllink
08-22-2017, 10:53 AM
I wonder if someone makes aluminum tuning heads? Are Gotoh's? Also...Rollie...did you ever say what you are going to buy? And are you coming up for the fall ukulele day with Lil' Rev in November? With school starting back next week...looks like this summer slipped away from me.
I have not decided what I want yet. Yes, I plan to come up in November. I'm actually waiting on buying anything until then, because there was such a variety of ukuleles for sale that I want to see what is there before I buy something. Besides, that gives me more time to talk about it. And yes, the summer got away from us. As far as the tuners, about two years ago I realized that I was losing the battle, so every once in a while I put a little 3 in 1 oil on them and I have a brush that I work the oil into ever cranny, then wipe off the excess. But they are still working, and I'm just going to keep hauling it out there until they won't work any more and then worry about replacing them. I'm interested to see how long that takes.

Jim.racerx
08-22-2017, 01:55 PM
This is an easy one. Fluke or Flea with plastic fretboard, but Peghed tuners. Done!
Pegheds are mostly Aluminum and plastic on the outside.

kkimura
08-23-2017, 02:10 AM
In my experience, and my beach ukulele has spent plenty of time on the beach, is not the wood, but the tuners. You can wipe rain and sand off of most any Uke, but the salt air plays hell with the tuners.

Good point Rlink. My guess is that the original beach ukuleles were solid koa with friction tuners. And, in an emergency, wood floats! ;)

Booli
08-23-2017, 04:27 AM
I'd be too worried about anything wood myself.

I know this does not satisfy the criteria of the OP, but...

For me, if the playability and tone of the Outdoor Ukulele was good enough, I'd likely go with that and replace the tuners with either sealed-geared tuners, or Gotoh UPT tuners, with are also sealed with the hope that the sea salt cannot get inside and corrode the gears. Barring that, with the existing tuners, I'd put a copious amount of lubrication on them before exposing them, something like bearing grease or even vaseline, and regularly check or re-apply as needed.

However, replacement tuners, similar to the originals on the OU, with the SAME mounting hole positions, are available on Amazon for about $5 or on CB Gitty for about $10 per set of four, so if they need to be replaced, it's not a big cost, and takes maybe no more than 20 minutes total if you have to remove and replace the strings with a manual string winder, and the only tool needed is a phillips head screwdriver.

Either an HPL uke as mentioned would be my second choice with similar considerations for the tuners.

My Fluke and Flea ukes are my favorites and I would consider taking them to a sea-salt environment a level of abuse that I would not subject them to.

Standard friction tuners are not an option for me, under ANY circumstances. I hate them with a passion, and the frustration they cause. Easier to use and modern replacements are everywhere, so if one were to suggest friction tuners, please understand that they are not now, nor will be anything I will want to use. That's just me.

Please understand that I am not judging nor condescending folks that love friction tuners, but I prefer literally ANYTHING else. :)

Croaky Keith
08-23-2017, 04:35 AM
I think I would probably go with the Outdoor Tenor, if it were me. :)

They seem to have good volume & tone from what I have heard of them.

dinghy
08-23-2017, 05:15 AM
ahoy

Outdoor Uke,
price is right
takes abuse in stride

really like my green soprano
check their web site

yours truly
mac

tinytaylor
08-24-2017, 10:56 AM
I know you don't want to go laminate, but as a fellow beach bum I'll suggest it anyway. You don't have to go for an over the top laminate koa that shines like a lighthouse (that's my baby :p), you could get one with a nice satin finish! Honestly as a street musician, beach bum and wandering soul I would never take an uke out in public that's not laminate. You will get every rude idiot within a five mile radius wanting to touch it, or take a picture with it, or break it somehow... the list is endless. Plus, if somebody's unmannered child decides to dump a bucket of sand or water over you (which has happened to me, control your damn munchkins people), you're gonna have a bad time. I would suggest buying one of the nicer laminates available, and put the rest towards your next uke :D

Rllink
08-24-2017, 11:14 AM
I'd be too worried about anything wood myself.


For me, if the playability and tone of the Outdoor Ukulele was good enough, I'd likely go with that and replace the tuners with either sealed-geared tuners, or Gotoh UPT tuners, with are also sealed with the hope that the sea salt cannot get inside and corrode the gears. Barring that, with the existing tuners, I'd put a copious amount of lubrication on them before exposing them, something like bearing grease or even vaseline, and regularly check or re-apply as need.

Standard friction tuners are not an option for me, under ANY circumstances. I hate them with a passion, and the frustration they cause. Easier to use and modern replacements are everywhere, so if one were to suggest friction tuners, please understand that they are not now, nor will be anything I will want to use. That's just me.

Please understand that I am not judging nor condescending folks that love friction tuners, but I prefer literally ANYTHING else. :)Well, the nice thing about wood is that it doesn't rust.
Any kind of grease smeared on the tuners is going to just attract sand and grind it into the gears. But when my tuners finally give it up, I'll will go with sealed tuners instead of the open ones. But honestly, in a beach environment, all you can do is slow it down a little. Sooner or later the salt eats everything. I mean, you just have to understand that a beach uke is not going to live forever. That's why they sell new ones.

Booli
08-24-2017, 12:48 PM
Well, the nice thing about wood is that it doesn't rust.
Any kind of grease smeared on the tuners is going to just attract sand and grind it into the gears. But when my tuners finally give it up, I'll will go with sealed tuners instead of the open ones. But honestly, in a beach environment, all you can do is slow it down a little. Sooner or later the salt eats everything. I mean, you just have to understand that a beach uke is not going to live forever. That's why they sell new ones.

Rolli, as usual, you've made some good points.

I know it's kind of ridiculous, at least for looks, but do you think that putting a ziplock or other sandwich bag over the entire headstock, with a rubber-band holding tight down by the nut will make a difference?

or is that only going to matter for exposure to water, and the salt in the air will still get to the metal and corrode it anyway?

Ukulelerick9255
08-24-2017, 05:44 PM
Ok what part of no laminates didn't you all understand lol the beach isn't the only place I'll be taking it.

Graham Greenbag
08-24-2017, 07:20 PM
....I need a ukulele to take places like the beach

So here's the question....you have $500 to spend on a tenor uke, what are you buying?

Just a couple of things that are preferences....gloss finish, slotted headstock, and not a fan of Mahogany....none of these are deal breakers.

No laminates that's a deal breaker.



The above seems clear enough to me. That you might want to take it other places too, (aside from places like the beach) doesn't come across to me, sorry.

The thread is titled 'Beach Uke' too ...... maybe it's just me, sorry, but I find it kind of easy to not pick up on your wish to be able to use it in some other places too. Perhaps the budget and build spec implied other use but it didn't state it.

RafterGirl
08-25-2017, 02:08 AM
Okey Dokey......got it.......$500 solid wood uke for beach & other places. I own an Islander tenor that I like. It's a slot head, but not gloss, solid spruce top & flame maple back and sides. The ebony arm bevel is a nice feature. Islander currently carries a solid acacia slot head, but it's over your price range at $640. http://www.islanderukulele.com/Custom/ShopProduct?id=19

How about a Kala KA-ATP-CTG - https://www.theukulelesite.com/kala-ka-atp-ct-solid-cedar-top-tenor-slothead-gloss-finish.html?___SID=U It's got a solid cedar top/acacia back & sides, gloss, slot head. I've seen it recommended a lot. Not all solid wood, but a solid top. You could have HMS add a pick-up. Definitely within your budget.

Pono solid acacia - Lots of people like Pono. Gloss, but not slot head. Again, you could have HMS add the pick-up. Right at your price point. https://www.theukulelesite.com/shop-by/size/tenor/pono-atd-acaciagloss-tenor.html

kkimura
08-25-2017, 02:31 AM
Let the opinions begin....I need a ukulele to take places like the beach where I'd never take my Beau Hannam custom uke. So here's the question....you have $500 to spend on a tenor uke, what are you buying? Just a couple of things that are preferences....gloss finish, slotted headstock, and not a fan of Mahogany....none of these are deal breakers. No laminates that's a deal breaker. Let the suggestions begin. Electronics would be nice but not necessary as I will be playing it outside mostly anyway.

If by by "laminates" you mean some form of plywood, this HPL ukulele might be the ideal beach ukulele for you. http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?121962-Enya-X1-ukulele

Rllink
08-25-2017, 03:52 AM
Ok what part of no laminates didn't you all understand lol the beach isn't the only place I'll be taking it.

Well then, just buy yourself a $500 wood ukulele with a slotted headstock and a gloss finish. I don't think that one $500 wood ukulele is going to weather the storm any better than another.

Pueo
08-25-2017, 11:37 AM
Rolli, as usual, you've made some good points.

I know it's kind of ridiculous, at least for looks, but do you think that putting a ziplock or other sandwich bag over the entire headstock, with a rubber-band holding tight down by the nut will make a difference?

or is that only going to matter for exposure to water, and the salt in the air will still get to the metal and corrode it anyway?
This.
Everything metal eventually succumbs where I live.
Pop the hood on the car, even aluminum parts like throttle bodies etc show signs of pitting.
The screen door, the grill in the back yard, hose spigots, EVERYTHING.
Even some of my indoor ukuleles in cases have some noticeable oxidation on frets and tuners, not much, but definitely noticeable. Proper care and cleaning helps a great deal, but over time, it happens.

Tigermelon
09-20-2017, 09:54 AM
It went 6km around NZ with me .

Is that six thousand miles or six kilometers? One is definitely more impressive than the other. :D

Finn Bjerke
03-29-2018, 01:02 AM
Outdoor Tenor ukulele: perfect sound and intonation, strong in cold and heat. I love mine. Sounddemo here: Indoor good mic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9XDe2WOhDI Crazy demo of it here in snow and general : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0sZ7c8gBcg

review here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=av1r8XdGrPE

New colours here: https://www.outdoorukulele.com/collections/ukuleles

Jerryc41
03-29-2018, 01:19 AM
A Waterman would be my first choice for the beach, or similar environment. You'd have a nice ukulele and $450 left over.

70sSanO
03-30-2018, 10:40 AM
You have been given a lot of good advice. Guitars have been taken to the beach for decades and have absorbed the various hazards with various degrees of success.

What I do find hilarious is wondering how this question would have been answered by Sam Kamaka... lol. Imagine taking a ukulele to the beach.

Truth is, if you want a pretty impervious high end sounding ukulele, just buck up and buy a Blackbird. You may want to swap out the UPT's with stainless open Waverly's. You then may be able to just hose it off when needed.

I am blessed with still being able to surf so I spend a great deal of time at the beach. Even with UPT's I have no problem taking a Blackbird to the beach.

The poor man's alternative is a Outdoor Carbon Ukulele.

Or, just buy a Kamaka and play it where it was designed to be played.

John

lifereinspired
03-30-2018, 03:11 PM
For myself, I'd definitely choose the Outdoor Ukulele. However, since you're not wanting that but do want something durable, I'd suggest the new Klos Carbon Fiber uke currently on Indiegogo. The "Super Early Bird" price is$419 & they will be $549 retail. I think the sound is great with a beautiful resonance. There are lots of videos on Klos's YouTube channel including several showing it's durability. Probably one of the most durable ukes that isn't a laminate or polycarbonate and has a more "wood like" resonance due to Klos's design. There Klos guitar was very well received with lots of positive reviews on the quality and sound. You might want to check it out.

70sSanO
03-31-2018, 09:44 AM
I had seen the Klos site, but didn't know anything about the instrument or mfg. For that amount it is definitely something to consider. It is definitely an excellent price point.

John

70sSanO
03-31-2018, 10:59 AM
I decided to buy a KLOS. It is now $439 with $29 shipping. The MSRP is supposed to be $545, but I can see that climbing some once things get going. The OP may not be interested in a sub-$500 carbon fiber ukulele, but I am. The Jake video pretty much sealed the deal. It does have some wood to no playing in the lineup... lol!

lifereinspired , thanks for the heads up!

John

Rllink
04-01-2018, 04:28 AM
I see the Waterman suggested a number of times. I have had three Waterman ukuleles, and I won all three in raffles. I've given all three away. I don't know anything about Outdoor ukuleles, so I won't speak to those, but when I go to the beach, camping, bicycling, or any outdoor activity like that, it is generally with other people, or somewhere I might attract the attention of other people, and we like to sit around singing songs. And I do a good deal of that kind of playing. I like to have a ukulele that sounds half way decent, that has some volume, and I need all the help that I can get. I want a nice ukulele, not a Waterman. And it isn't just the Waterman that I wouldn't take to the beach, it is any ukulele that I wouldn't play somewhere else. The beach or around the campfire is not a place where I want to sit in the sand just making sound. I want something that plays nice and that other people can enjoy too. So I'm just saying here, that when considering what ukulele to get to take to the beach, that one might also consider taking a bit of risk in order to have an enjoyable experience. And one doesn't need to spend a lot of money on a ukulele to do that, but it is worth thinking about.

hendulele
04-01-2018, 05:21 AM
The Flight travel soprano baz just reviewed may be an option, because it sounds more like a Flea than a true plastic uke. Otherwise I’d suggest a Flea or Fluke with the friction tuners. No moving parts to get gummed up by sand or the salt air. If those aren’t for you, then I suppose it’s a matter of choosing other tradeoffs: durability, potential for damage, volume.

RafterGirl
04-01-2018, 05:38 AM
Iíll jump back into this conversation. I take a uke with me on whitewater rafting & sea kayaking trips. Water, hot or cold temps, and definitely sand & dirt are always in the mix. I am usually the only instrument, and I want a uke that sounds decent and is fairly loud. I found the Waterman lacking in both of those things. I also had an HPL Bonanza that sounded good but was pretty quiet. It also failed my other requirement of lighter weight & packability inside my sea kayak. I currently use an Islander AS-4 soprano (inexpensive laminate) as my outdoor uke. It passes all the tests on sound, playability, weight, and size. It could be louder but itís no where near as quiet as the Bonanza was. Now Iím trying to convince myself to invest in a concert Flea. Concert scale I prefer, durable, maybe louder? Not sure if I really need something other than my Islander. Iím trying to ďtest driveĒ a friendís Flea to see if I like it that much more?

Del1015
05-31-2018, 10:03 AM
My Outdoor Uke has served me well here the humidity of Virginia summers. A Blackbird Clara or Farallon is definitely activating my UAS.

RonT
06-01-2018, 03:25 AM
"What I do find hilarious is wondering how this question would have been answered by Sam Kamaka... lol. Imagine taking a ukulele to the beach"

Yep, who would do a that?
Cheers,
R
https://s15.postimg.cc/6yo4rfc9z/Huron_Kamaka_sanding_001.jpg (https://postimg.cc/image/6yo4rfc9z/)

Ziret
06-01-2018, 04:31 AM
When we go to the beach in the Pacific Northwest, there's not much/any chance swimming will be involved. But unless a person actually wants to swim with a ukulele, I think there are plenty of options for a durable uke that sound much better than an Outdoor or Waterman, etc., while costing much less than one made from carbon fiber or ekoa. My car/camping/bonfire/picnic/river/lake/beach uke is a Mahilele/Flight Travel soprano, similar to a Flea, but costing far less.

I have yet to try an all-plastic uke that I enjoy playing or listening to. I'd rather take my chances with a cheap laminate.