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View Full Version : "Woodslicer" 1/2 inch bandsaw blade.



DPO
09-06-2017, 06:14 PM
I have a newish 14 inch bandsaw with a fairly new 1/2 inch blade on it which was pretty tough to resaw with. So after reading a few reviews I bought a Woodslicer from Highland woodworking in the US. It arrived today and what a difference it makes it slices wood like butter. I am truly very impressed. The only non impressive bit was they wanted to charge me US $39.00 to ship a $29.00 blade to New Zealand, so I got it shipped to NZ posts warehouse in Portland and had it forwarded to me from there for US $16.00 . But all in all I am very impressed and would happily recommend the blade and the service.

Kekani
09-06-2017, 11:29 PM
Love the Woodslicer.

When its sharp.

Yankulele
09-07-2017, 12:30 AM
Great blade. I found mine didn't stay sharp for long. You might want to save it for important jobs. I have heard of people resharpening them with a Dremel tool.

Nelson

Pete Howlett
09-07-2017, 03:27 PM
I use Tuff-saw blades here in the UK with a wide skip tooth that has a 'clearing' tooth in the gulley. Makes for fast dust clearance and prevents binding in the cut thus giving a clean finish. It won't last witht he leadwood fignerboards I have to convert! All blades get dull in the end.

DPO
09-07-2017, 04:28 PM
I use Tuff-saw blades here in the UK with a wide skip tooth that has a 'clearing' tooth in the gulley. Makes for fast dust clearance and prevents binding in the cut thus giving a clean finish. It won't last witht he leadwood fignerboards I have to convert! All blades get dull in the end.

Had a quick look at the Tuff site Pete, they seem to be very similar specs as the woodslicer. I guess when it gets dull I will get it sharpened as with any other blade.

jcalkin
09-08-2017, 04:47 AM
Great blade. I found mine didn't stay sharp for long. You might want to save it for important jobs. I have heard of people resharpening them with a Dremel.

Nelson

I have been using the Dremel tool method of sharpening bandsaw blades for a very long time. Its hardly an exact science but its fast and the blade doesn't have to come off of the machine. The blade drift may be different afterwards.

I use a 3 t.p.i. 1/4" blade for just about everything, probably because I'm lazy. Just when I realize I'm working too hard pushing wood through they break, so they very seldom get resharpened. I've wanted a genuine resaw machine since beginning my lutherie career, but I would have spent 98% of my shop time walking around it. I've resawn uke wood on the table saw for years now just because its fast, but now I rarely resaw at all. eBay has made uke sets cheap enough that I collect them faster than I can use them.

Pete Howlett
09-08-2017, 04:52 AM
I never get bored of resawing. I have a heavy duty bandsaw dedicated for it and love the thrill of converting wood. If you set your saw up right you just don't need an expensive Hitachi or other make resaw. What I do covet tho is one of those Makita planing machines that shoots the wood through a static blade and power planes the wood... only available in Japan!

Kevs-the-name
09-09-2017, 01:37 PM
I too use tuffs blades, but I’m struggling big time resewing makore.

I have managed to blunt 4 blades, only managing to produce 1 set of back and front, and 6 pairs of sides..
i have been using:
1/2" - SuperTuff Premium
- Blade Length: 72 1/2” / 1842mm
- TPI: 3/4 Vari-Tooth
I can't afford to use that many blades. Makore is one tough wood!
any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Kekani
09-09-2017, 02:18 PM
I too use tuffs blades, but I’m struggling big time resewing makore.

I have managed to blunt 4 blades, only managing to produce 1 set of back and front, and 6 pairs of sides..
i have been using:
1/2" - SuperTuff Premium
- Blade Length: 72 1/2” / 1842mm
- TPI: 3/4 Vari-Tooth
I can't afford to use that many blades. Makore is one tough wood!
any advice would be greatly appreciated.

As Pete stated, your setup is important. I don't think I "need" a Hitachi, but I have one, and it works well, with my upgrades. For blades, I'm currently settled on Lenox Blades - I use the Woodmaster B for milling (which I rarely do), and Woodmaster CT for resawing (this blade stays on 99.9% of the time). I ran through too many Woodslicers and Timberwolf blades. Of course, the Woodslicer gives the nicest finish off the blade for me, so I'm conceding that quality for sure. AND, the Woodslicers cost a HECK of a lot less than the Lenox Woodmaster C; not sure how it compared to Tuffs.


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