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plunker
09-28-2017, 02:38 AM
I am have trouble. I am working on Bridge Over Troubled Water. The music I am using (easy piano version) starts with a F chord with the f on the 1st string 8th fret. The first note is the a above that. When I come off the f chord my fingers seem to stick or for some other reason I get a residual chord. How do I stop that?

spookelele
09-28-2017, 05:29 AM
Can you make a short vid showing what's happening?

jimavery
09-28-2017, 08:25 AM
Hmm, my main thought is humidity. If it's humid and/or my hands are a bit (dare I say?) sweaty, then making a sound as I lift off the fretboard can be a bit of a problem. Obviously just practising at home it's not a big problem; I either just accept that's how it is that day, or maybe just take a break, wash and dry my hands and start again.

I guess it probably helps if the skin on my fingers is good & hard through lots of practice. I confess I don't play anything like as much as I used to now, so my finger-tips have softened and the problem you describe is more prevalent. So, as ever, I think the answer to your question is maybe simply practice, practice, practice!

Lowering the action a little (if it's too high) might help to alleviate that twang as the fingers lift off the fretboard too, but I don't think that would entirely solve it. Some strings are smoother in feel than others; if you think it's the surface of the string that is contributing to the stickiness then maybe try a different brand of string. Of the strings I've tried I would think Worth Brown were maybe the smoothest in feel; I can't say I've tried anything like all kinds of string though.

Crudely, it also occurs to me that if you strum harder, the sound from your fret hand won't seem so significant! :music:

plunker
09-28-2017, 01:54 PM
Hmm, my main thought is humidity. If it's humid and/or my hands are a bit (dare I say?) sweaty, then making a sound as I lift off the fretboard can be a bit of a problem. Obviously just practising at home it's not a big problem; I either just accept that's how it is that day, or maybe just take a break, wash and dry my hands and start again.

I guess it probably helps if the skin on my fingers is good & hard through lots of practice. I confess I don't play anything like as much as I used to now, so my finger-tips have softened and the problem you describe is more prevalent. So, as ever, I think the answer to your question is maybe simply practice, practice, practice!

Lowering the action a little (if it's too high) might help to alleviate that twang as the fingers lift off the fretboard too, but I don't think that would entirely solve it. Some strings are smoother in feel than others; if you think it's the surface of the string that is contributing to the stickiness then maybe try a different brand of string. Of the strings I've tried I would think Worth Brown were maybe the smoothest in feel; I can't say I've tried anything like all kinds of string though.

Crudely, it also occurs to me that if you strum harder, the sound from your fret hand won't seem so significant! :music:

Spookelelee, Thanks, I will see if I can do that.

plunker
09-28-2017, 01:57 PM
Jimavery, I was thinking my finger pad might be soft. Also,it doesn't seem to happen down the neck just up high. higher tension up high and soft fingers being a bad combination?

jimavery
09-28-2017, 10:55 PM
Jimavery, I was thinking my finger pad might be soft. Also,it doesn't seem to happen down the neck just up high. higher tension up high and soft fingers being a bad combination?

I don't think it's so much higher tension that's the problem, it's the fact that the string is that much more elevated from the fretboard the closer to the sound hole you go so you have to press them that much further. That's where a good setup might help - if the action (the height of the strings above the fretboard) is lowered, it should make it easier to form chords further up the fretboard without the fingers staying in contact with the strings longer than they have to. Adjusting the action is always a compromise though - if it's too low then you might get buzzing, and you might not be able to strum so loudly. I didn't think action was that much of an issue myself until I bought a ukulele with a nice low action - it makes a huge difference to playability. I'm lucky to have a luthier in my home town who has adjusted the action on a couple of my ukuleles to lower the action a little. It often helps with intonation too.

Oh and I sometimes find my fingernails on the fret hand inadvertently pluck the strings (you'd know if that was your problem!) so I keep those good and short.