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Iza
11-01-2017, 05:16 AM
Does anybody else think that medieval and renaissance music sounds really good on the ukulele? I heard Tourdion by Wilfried Welti on YouTube and bought the e-book with the tabs just for this song, as it is one of my favourites. Unfortunately I couldn't play all of it yet, it's difficult for me. :( But I can play Greensleeves and Scarborough Fair just fine. :cool: Can you suggest any medieval tunes for me? I'm not a total beginner but I'm not a good player either.

Ukecaster
11-01-2017, 05:34 AM
No suggestions here, but Wilfried's Tourdion performance is indeed beautiful, and something to aspire to. What chops!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5gkwek2zds

Iza
11-01-2017, 06:06 AM
No suggestions here, but Wilfried's Tourdion performance is indeed beautiful, and something to aspire to. What chops!


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x5gkwek2zds

:agree: :rock: <3

janeray1940
11-01-2017, 06:11 AM
Tony Mizen's book From Lute to Uke (https://www.amazon.com/Lute-Uke-Ukulele-Package-Songbook/dp/1458406512) would be my recommendation - he also has a few other classical books that are worth checking out. His arrangements are really nice!

Iza
11-01-2017, 06:21 AM
Tony Mizen's book From Lute to Uke (https://www.amazon.com/Lute-Uke-Ukulele-Package-Songbook/dp/1458406512) would be my recommendation - he also has a few other classical books that are worth checking out. His arrangements are really nice!

YES
This is exactly what I was looking for.
Time to save some money.
Thanks.

Tootler
11-01-2017, 09:35 AM
I have Tony Mizen's book. It's very good but I haven't played it much. I play a lot of early music on recorder but I use the uke primarily for singing. I sing songs from the 17th & 18th century and have my 8 string uke tuned like a Renaissance Guitar.

Down Up Dick
11-01-2017, 09:46 AM
I always get a kick out of these threads. Everyone seems to buy a (Hawaiian) ukulele, and then tries to play Jazz or Rock or Baroque or Gypsy or God only knows what else. I wonder if even Hawaiians are playing the music of the islands.

Now don’t get me wrong . . . of course it’s okay. Play what ever you like, but I just find it amusing. :old:

WifeOnFourStrings
11-01-2017, 11:08 AM
Amazon has been pushing that book on me for months and I've been ignoring them. :eek: I don't think I'm ready skill-wise to take the plunge, but after watching that beautiful performance by Wilfried Welti it's now on my ukulele bucket list.

Piecomics
11-01-2017, 01:21 PM
What is amusing about it?

I'm currently messing around with both nagauta songs and maskandi Zulu music on the uke, sounds good!


I always get a kick out of these threads. Everyone seems to buy a (Hawaiian) ukulele, and then tries to play Jazz or Rock or Baroque or Gypsy or God only knows what else. I wonder if even Hawaiians are playing the music of the islands.

Now don’t get me wrong . . . of course it’s okay. Play what ever you like, but I just find it amusing. :old:

sculptor
11-01-2017, 07:04 PM
Do you play or high-g or low-g? Note, there are probably more things out there for low-g. I'm working on Tell me Daphne by Byrd and Espanoleta by Gaspar Sanz. The best way to find them is with a web search...

-- Gary

sculptor
11-01-2017, 07:07 PM
https://www.hobgoblin.com/local/sales/products/GM07010/1000-english-country-dance/

This book has 1000 tunes some dating from 1000 years ago. It has reproductions of "The English Dancemaster" 1651 Edition by John Playford, its hard to find anything more authentic than a copy of the original. The old notation is fun to work out. As well as many other fine old tunes in the original arrangement. There are very few tunes which you wont be able to play on your uke, most notes in between D4 and G5 and fit well on a re-entrant GCEA ukulele fretboard. It will keep you busy for years if you can find a copy.

It's kind of fun to work out the dances too!

-- Gary

Iza
11-02-2017, 04:58 AM
I always get a kick out of these threads. Everyone seems to buy a (Hawaiian) ukulele, and then tries to play Jazz or Rock or Baroque or Gypsy or God only knows what else. I wonder if even Hawaiians are playing the music of the islands.

Now don’t get me wrong . . . of course it’s okay. Play what ever you like, but I just find it amusing. :old:

But it looks a bit like a renaissance guitar, at least to my inexperienced eyes. xD And I like how it sounds with punk. Almost anything, really. And experimenting is fun.


http://ukeclassicaltabs.blogspot.com.au/
https://renaissance-ukukele.blogspot.com.au/

Thanks! I also found this https://pdfminstrel.wordpress.com :D
I play high g, but I'm considering switching it to low... Or putting a capo on my guitar. It works fine, at least for the easier tunes.


https://www.hobgoblin.com/local/sales/products/GM07010/1000-english-country-dance/

This book has 1000 tunes some dating from 1000 years ago. It has reproductions of "The English Dancemaster" 1651 Edition by John Playford, its hard to find anything more authentic than a copy of the original. The old notation is fun to work out. As well as many other fine old tunes in the original arrangement. There are very few tunes which you wont be able to play on your uke, most notes in between D4 and G5 and fit well on a re-entrant GCEA ukulele fretboard. It will keep you busy for years if you can find a copy.

Nice! And I'd like to get used to reading notes, cause now I mostly read tabs... I know how to read music, I just have a long time to do it...


Do you play or high-g or low-g? Note, there are probably more things out there for low-g. I'm working on Tell me Daphne by Byrd and Espanoleta by Gaspar Sanz. The best way to find them is with a web search...

-- Gary

High, but I have a guitar and a capo too. xD


I tabbed "Espanoleta" a while back, it works quite nicely in high g. Just drop me a PM if you'd like a copy.

Ok, I will, thank you!

actadh
11-02-2017, 05:05 AM
I tuned my soprano Brueko a full step down to F A# D G. I use the same chord shapes as standard tuning. Early music sounds wonderful with a deeper, more mellow tone.

I used this digital tuner to get in the tone ballpark - click Full Step Down on Alternative Tunings
http://www.get-tuned.com/html5-ukulele-tuner.php

and the G setting on my Reverb tuner to finish tuning.

actadh
11-02-2017, 08:14 AM
A small correction: although electronic tuners tend to show only sharp names, not flat ones, the open strings of fleas tunings are normally considered to play sixth chords, and thus the tuning F A# D G is better known as Bb tuning: F Bb D G (= Bb6). Bb is by far the more common spelling for that pitch—of course, the correct spelling always depends on context. In the case of tuning, you're talking about dropping the common C tuning by a whole step, and thus, as with the other three tuning pitches, the spelling should drop by one letter, not two, so Bb is the more correct spelling.

If the tuning were based on A#6, the spelling would be E# A# Cx Fx (x represents a double-sharp)—yucko! The key of A#, if it existed in standard notation, which it doesn't, would have 11 sharps: three sharp notes, four double-sharps. A#6 is a valid chord—usually occurring as a passing chord—but you'll rarely encounter it in the popular keys, unlike Bb6, which you often see in keys like Bb and F.

I mention this because I see Bb tuning misspelled so often, primarily due to the sharp bias of tuners. I regret if people think I'm making a mountain of a molehill; I'm just trying to clarify why it's Bb instead of A# and why it matters.

Going by the link in my post, it is showing on that site as F4 A#3 D4 G4. And, you are right - it shows that when # is enabled. When b is enabled, it show as F4 Bb3 D4 G4.

When I tune it on the Reverb tuner, it shows as A#when it gets into the green (correctly tuned) zone.

In any case, it sounds really good, and it was thanks to another UU poster that I tried that tuning. Mizell's The Bear Dance and Welti's Andantino by Carulli are particularly nice with that tuning.

Tootler
11-02-2017, 09:42 AM
https://www.hobgoblin.com/local/sales/products/GM07010/1000-english-country-dance/

This book has 1000 tunes some dating from 1000 years ago. It has reproductions of "The English Dancemaster" 1651 Edition by John Playford, its hard to find anything more authentic than a copy of the original. The old notation is fun to work out. As well as many other fine old tunes in the original arrangement. There are very few tunes which you wont be able to play on your uke, most notes in between D4 and G5 and fit well on a re-entrant GCEA ukulele fretboard. It will keep you busy for years if you can find a copy.

I have that book and have had it for some years now, long before I got a ukulele. It's a fabulous resource if you're interested in traditional dance tunes. It has a facsimile of the first edition of Playford's Dancing Master from 1651 and a facsimile of the songs from the Beggar's Opera (without the bass lines). Most of the tunes are current though.

If you specifically want Playford tunes, this is an excellent resource: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Playfords-Dancing-Master-Violin-Faber/dp/0571507239/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1509647304&sr=8-4&keywords=playford+dancing+master it says for violin but is fine for any melody instrument. The link is for Amazon UK but it's likely available elsewhere. I have a copy and it's an excellent resource.

If you are going to play traditional dance tunes on soprano ukulele, I suggest you tune your uke ADF#B as the typical Range is from D4 to B5 and you quite often need that B5 note which is not there on a 12 fret uke tuned GCEA. Concert and tenor ukuleles with more frets will have the range available.

Tootler
11-02-2017, 09:54 AM
I always get a kick out of these threads. Everyone seems to buy a (Hawaiian) ukulele, and then tries to play Jazz or Rock or Baroque or Gypsy or God only knows what else. I wonder if even Hawaiians are playing the music of the islands.

Now don’t get me wrong . . . of course it’s okay. Play what ever you like, but I just find it amusing. :old:

The Ukulele is just a variant of a number of small guitar like instruments that have been around for a long time. It has the advantage of ready availability and a decent instrument is a lot cheaper than a reproduction of a period instrument. My 8 string uke cost me 120GBP. A reproduction Renaissance Guitar will cost about 1500GBP. They both use the same tuning.

Down Up Dick
11-02-2017, 11:30 AM
The Ukulele is just a variant of a number of small guitar like instruments that have been around for a long time. It has the advantage of ready availability and a decent instrument is a lot cheaper than a reproduction of a period instrument. My 8 string uke cost me 120GBP. A reproduction Renaissance Guitar will cost about 1500GBP. They both use the same tuning.

Yes, of course. And one can play “Asleep in the Deep” on a piccolo if he/she feels like it. We are smack in the middle of the “do whatever the heck ya wanna do” age. And if one comments on the fitness of things, he/she is an out of step old fogey.

I suppose all this freedom of choice may be improving the ukulele’s acceptance as a musical instrument, but I still find some of the choices amusing.

And, yes, I am an old fogey! :old:

gilles T
11-02-2017, 12:21 PM
Hello Tootler,

You're right, the eight string tenor is the perfect cheap alternative to the pricey renaissance guitar. I bought my Baton Rouge just to get closer to the renaissance sound, and was very happy to get a decent instrument in the price range you mention —120 to 180 £, or €.
That said, it sounds a bit thinny and makes me really carving for a real renaissance guitar, because that —not so— diminutive instrument features a string length closer to a baritone than a tenor...
And, from what I may know of, the 8th string baritone is a rare beast, and a quite expensive one.

So, for someone really interested in the renaissance guitar repertoire, it may be wise to save money for the real thing, an 8 stringer being cool but quickly unsatisfying when you become really involved in that special repertoire.

Just my 2 cents.
regards,
Gilles

Tootler
11-02-2017, 02:00 PM
Yes, of course. And one can play “Asleep in the Deep” on a piccolo if he/she feels like it. We are smack in the middle of the “do whatever the heck ya wanna do” age. And if one comments on the fitness of things, he/she is an out of step old fogey.

I suppose all this freedom of choice may be improving the ukulele’s acceptance as a musical instrument, but I still find some of the choices amusing.

And, yes, I am an old fogey! :old:

The ukulele was being used for music other than Hawaiian quite early on, in fact once it took hold after being demonstrated on the US mainland in the early 1900s. Sheet music of popular songs of the 1920s used to have ukulele chord symbols on them so folk using the ukulele to accompany popular song is nothing new.


Hello Tootler,

You're right, the eight string tenor is the perfect cheap alternative to the pricey renaissance guitar. I bought my Baton Rouge just to get closer to the renaissance sound, and was very happy to get a decent instrument in the price range you mention —120 to 180 £, or €.
That said, it sounds a bit thinny and makes me really carving for a real renaissance guitar, because that —not so— diminutive instrument features a string length closer to a baritone than a tenor...
And, from what I may know of, the 8th string baritone is a rare beast, and a quite expensive one.

So, for someone really interested in the renaissance guitar repertoire, it may be wise to save money for the real thing, an 8 stringer being cool but quickly unsatisfying when you become really involved in that special repertoire.

Just my 2 cents.
regards,
Gilles

Kala make an 8 string Baritone and I did a quick check and it seems to be selling here in the UK for around 300 GBP. More than a Baton Rouge 8 string tenor but still a very reasonable price. My 8 string is a Baton Rouge and I have Living Water fluorocarbon strings on it, very different from the gut strings of a Renaissance Guitar and that will affect the tone. I'm more interested in using mine to accompany popular song of the era - mainly broadsides - than the more formal repertoire. I did consider getting a Mandola and retuning it DGBE as an affordable alternative to a Renaissance cittern but I find the 8 string tenor an acceptable compromise for what I want and it works very nicely for accompanying traditional song as well.

sculptor
11-02-2017, 02:00 PM
I tabbed "Espanoleta" a while back, it works quite nicely in high g. Just drop me a PM if you'd like a copy.

That's the one that I play... many thanks to you and those on web the that supply free EM tabs.

-- Gary

Down Up Dick
11-02-2017, 03:56 PM
Well, Tootler, you’re correct. I have some old music with uke chords. No problem, everyone has a right to play whatever he/she likes. Let freedom ring. We are in agreement, and I am amused.

“All’s well that ends well.” :old:

kypfer
11-02-2017, 11:57 PM
Jamie Holding's tabs are still a favourite of mine. At least one of his e-books finds it's way onto my music stand every few weeks. His web-site is long gone, unfortunately, but a copy of it can be found on the "Archive Machine", with a link to a free e-book here, http://web.archive.org/web/20130607053401/http://www.classicalukulele.co.uk/free-ebook/ . Follow the menu links for other sample pages. Jamie was still answering e-mails and mailing pdf's of his other publications relatively recently.

A lot of music arranged for descant or tenor recorder will translate to the re-entrant ukulele directly, these recorders also having a lowest note of "C" and much early music is of relatively limited range ... that's not to say it's easy. Some of the timing changes can be quite the PITA to get to grips with, which is, of course, half the charm of it :)

Enjoy :music:

Tootler
11-03-2017, 01:02 AM
I think Down Up Dick does have an interesting point. You can play anything on your ukulele, and you should play anything on your ukulele, but don't just play anything on your ukulele.
Take some time to learn about the genre you are playing. Read some biographies, read some articles, work out what the music is about. Obviously in the first week you are just going to be reading the music and enjoying the noise, but as you keep going put in some time learning the background to the music. I think this is the way to get the most enjoyment and the emotion will feed back into your playing. Get to a point where you can talk about the arrangers and the history of the music's era and why you think it is still worthy of being played.

Bill1 has a good point here. It's about understanding the music you are playing and then making it work with the ukulele. In fact, I find it an interesting challenge to take a song written for a different genre/style of music and adapt it to the ukulele. If the song is well written in the first place, it will work with any instrument[s].

PS. DuD I'm also an old fogey but I hope not set in my ways :old:

Hms
11-03-2017, 01:22 AM
A slight waver on/off topic.
Have a search for Lutes and Ukes, a collaboration between UOGB and Theatre of the Ayre.
https://vimeo.com/66684600
h

Down Up Dick
11-03-2017, 03:58 AM
Geoff, I’m not exactly sure what “set in my ways” means, but I like what I like.

I, too, once played recorders, and I mostly played Baroque music on ‘em. But, nowadays, I also sometimes play snatches of Bach on my ukes. I also play old standards once in a while. So I do get out of my box sometimes.

But I’m a believer in the rightness of things. I sorta like things to be the way they’re supposed to be. So, in that way I guess I am “set in my ways”. I think Sousa marches on an Ocarina and Brubeck’s “Take Five” on a tin whistle and Beethoven’s “Ode to Joy” on a ukulele may all be playable, but I find those musical ideas . . . amusing.

But, as I said before, I am an ol’ fogey. :old:

Tootler
11-03-2017, 02:17 PM
Apologies Dick. I didn't mean to imply you were set in your ways but rather I was speaking about myself. I hope I'm capable of adapting to new ideas. I'm afraid I didn't think through properly how that statement could be taken.

I'm enjoying my musical journey and it takes me to interesting places and In that sense I'm not set in my ways but I'm not intending to imply that all older people are set in their ways (though too many are, sadly and they miss out on so much)

Old fart and proud of it :old:

Down Up Dick
11-03-2017, 03:56 PM
Poor Iza wants to play Medieval/Renaissance music and wants info about it.

Maybe it’s time for me to be amused quietly to myself . . . :old:

actadh
11-03-2017, 03:59 PM
Jamie Holding's tabs are still a favourite of mine. At least one of his e-books finds it's way onto my music stand every few weeks. His web-site is long gone, unfortunately, but a copy of it can be found on the "Archive Machine", with a link to a free e-book here, http://web.archive.org/web/20130607053401/http://www.classicalukulele.co.uk/free-ebook/ . Follow the menu links for other sample pages. Jamie was still answering e-mails and mailing pdf's of his other publications relatively recently.

A lot of music arranged for descant or tenor recorder will translate to the re-entrant ukulele directly, these recorders also having a lowest note of "C" and much early music is of relatively limited range ... that's not to say it's easy. Some of the timing changes can be quite the PITA to get to grips with, which is, of course, half the charm of it :)

Enjoy :music:

Thank you for this!

Kimosabe
11-03-2017, 07:34 PM
I’m a big fan of Tony Mizen’s Lute to Uke book. Beautiful arrangements. For me Renaissance music, besides its inherent beauty, shows where folk and rock have their roots.

With regard to ukes being used for more than Hawaiian music one might read the article about Ledward Kāāpānā in the new issue of Ukulele magazine. In it he speaks of how he and other Hawaiians were early on listening to Roy Smeck and Lyle Ritz as well as Eddie Kamae. It is stereotyping Hawaiians to think that they only listen to Hawaiian music. There are many kinds of music that are popular in Hawaii. Hawaiians like music, all kinds. Hawaii is a gathering place of many cultures. I live in Hawaii. Tonight I can hear Hawaiian, punk, reggae, rock, jazz and classical, and probably some trance music at the clubs in Chinatown.

The uke comes from Madeira. Perhaps we should only use it to accompany Portuguese lyrics, but then again it all goes back to the oud, and then we should sing in Arabic. The word lute it derived from l’oud.

It’s a big mixed up world.

Tootler
11-04-2017, 12:15 PM
I think renaissance music works very well on the ukulele. Listen to some renaissance lute music then listen to some renaissance music played on a ukulele and you will find the sound is not that different, especially with a tenor uke which has a bit more sustain than a soprano. The timbre of both lute and ukulele are not really all that different.

gilles T
11-05-2017, 04:05 AM
Hello,

For those who can read french tablature, I strongly recommend this little-known but fantastic ressource : http://www.verseandsong.com/song/renaissance-guitar/

Mr Stephen Ardnt transcribed a huge selection of recorder music by Jacob Van Eyck, with many divisions in the late renaissance style.

Regards,
Gilles

plunker
11-15-2017, 03:00 AM
I have the Lute to Uke Book. I like the songs and they way they sound. BTW, I play them on y tenor not my lute-a-lelee.

gilles T
11-15-2017, 08:37 AM
Hello,

This might be of some interest for the more advanced players ; I recently stumbled upon a huge collection of music for alto recorder : "the solo baroque book/ The essential 18th century unaccompanied repertoire for alto recorder" edited by Bernard Thomas, Dolce editions. The range of alto recorder makes it quite "uke friendly" and a big part of the works listed here never venture below the middle "g", which may open some opportunities for the re-entrant tuning. Quite a bit of work, spiced with some imagination, allows the intermediate/advanced player to enjoy a whole new repertoire for the uke... Strongly recommended!

regards,
Gilles

Tootler
11-18-2017, 03:06 AM
As a recorder player, I would just sound a note of caution.

The range of an alto recorder is from F4 - G6, just over two octaves and the baroque repertoire makes use of that full range.

A GCEA reentrant tuned Ukulele has a range C4 - A6 with 12 frets or with 15 frets, common on a concert you can get to C6, a full two octaves and with 17 frets, common on a tenor you can get to D6 which happens to give you the same range as a tenor recorder. (A soprano recorder is an octave higher)

My point is that while there will be many pieces in that baroque solos book which are playable on a GCEA tuned Ukulele, you will find a significant number of pieces where a ukulele will not be able to play the top notes.

A ukulele tuned DGBE will definitely let you play everything in that book but an octave down which actually might sound rather good with the more mellow tone.

If you're interested in music by the likes of Bach, Telemann and others from that era, then it's worthwhile but be aware that you may not be able to access everything but there will certainly be enough available to to keep you busy for a very long time.

Of course, you can always transpose those pieces that need the higher notes into a key that makes them accessible. A lot of classical guitar music involves transpositions of music originally written for other instruments.

Nickie
11-18-2017, 07:00 AM
A slight waver on/off topic.
Have a search for Lutes and Ukes, a collaboration between UOGB and Theatre of the Ayre.
https://vimeo.com/66684600
h

This was really cool! Hearing George Hinchcliffe play with them was "amusing".
Dick, I guess if it wasn't amusing, some of us wouldn't bother with it.
I just found a piece of sheet music from the early days called "La Volta", it is very fun to play, and when I learn it, maybe I'll post it!

AmandaJ
11-22-2017, 01:42 AM
I'm another fan of Tony Mizen's "From Lute to Uke" book. I've only just bought it but so far it's going well. :)

gilles T
11-22-2017, 03:41 AM
Dear Geoff Walker,

You are absolutely right and the infos you give are very useful, because I'm not a recorder player and I'm used to think everything in terms of "relative pitch" — so to me the lowest note on an alto recorder score is a "c", even if I know that it's actually an "f". And I agree with you, many pieces in that collection feature notes far too high for any uke. That said, many others fit nicely on four strings, even if they are all quite challenging.
regards,
Gilles