PDA

View Full Version : loop end strings . . . huh?



DaveY
11-05-2017, 06:54 AM
I'm trying to put on two Thomastik Infeld strings, and I see that one string end has a loop in it.

Should I just ignore this and install as I always have?

Or is there a special purpose for the little loop?

It's a tie bridge on the uke. I assume that this loop end goes through the bridge...but if so, do I cut the loop or try to squeeze it through?

Thanks.

besley
11-05-2017, 07:00 AM
I may be missing something here, but it seems as if nothing could be more simple. Just thread the non-looped end through the bottom of the tie bridge hole, up towards the nut. Then run this free end through the loop, and run the string over the nut and into the tuner. The result will be essentially the same as if you had tied the string on normally, but without the hassle of tying a knot.

M3Ukulele
11-05-2017, 08:13 AM
Do you have a picture of the loop end

jer
11-05-2017, 08:27 AM
Loop end? That is used with mandolins and banjos usually. So maybe it is a string that is also used for a set for one or both of those instruments. I used their strings when I played mandolin for a bit. They were nice.

Unless these strings are not supposed to be cut due to unraveling, I'd say just cut that part of the string off.

DaveY
11-05-2017, 08:47 AM
Here are two photos: one of the loop end, the other of the two ends of the same string: loop is on the end with the smaller amount of red on it, if that matters. I could ask what the red is all about, but one thing at a time.

(photo tip: use a dead leaf as background when needed)

Booli
11-05-2017, 10:26 AM
the loop end for all thomastik strings goes towards the bridge

99% of the time most of us using them on uke, just cut off the loop end, leaving about 1.5" of the red silk wrap

leaving more than that you have the red silk over the saddle, which will impeded vibration transfer from the string and have an adverse effect on tone

all of this is NORMAL, as these strings are made initially for classical guitar, but so are 99% of all 'uke strings' which are just the same materials but cut shorter and labeled as 'uke strings' (as proven and admitted by several string making companies)

after I cut the end, I usually put a dab of clear nail polish over the tip of the string and let it dry for a few mins so as to help prevent any unraveling of the chrome flatwound over-wrap wire.

DaveY
11-06-2017, 09:26 AM
Thank to everyone for the help. I don't mean to brag, but I actually got one of the strings through the bridge without cutting off the loop (which I've learned is just a way to discourage the string from unraveling).

And the strings sound better than what I had on before, as recommended by UUers in another recent thread.

Booli
11-06-2017, 10:13 PM
Thank to everyone for the help. I don't mean to brag, but I actually got one of the strings through the bridge without cutting off the loop (which I've learned is just a way to discourage the string from unraveling).

And the strings sound better than what I had on before, as recommended by UUers in another recent thread.

I use the Thomastik strings almost everywhere I need a wound string, for both classical guitar and on all different ukes, and various tunings and find them to work very well.

I would offer that if you have the red silk over-wrap on the saddle, crossing over the saddle at the string break-point, your sound (both volume and tone) will be less than optimal.