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Lapyang
11-16-2017, 05:02 PM
I was reading a post by IamNoMan, and the title was "...tuned to 432Hz."
I am not familiar to this way of tuning. What does it mean? Can someone tell me more?

Booli
11-16-2017, 05:50 PM
Previous discussions on this topic are here:

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?122377-A-432Hz

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?75201-Tuning-to-various-frequencies-440-vs-432-MHz

http://forum.ukuleleunderground.com/showthread.php?65396-Quick-tune-to-A-432

and more mentions via:

https://www.google.com/search?source=hp&ei=8FsOWrOvLsrrmQHqvoAo&q=432+site%3Aforum.ukuleleunderground.com&oq=432+site%3Aforum.ukuleleunderground.com&gs_l=psy-ab.3...1799.1799.0.3174.1.1.0.0.0.0.112.112.0j1.1. 0....0...1..64.psy-ab..0.0.0....0.JNUzTAcCfrk

Hope this helps! :)

Jarmo_S
11-17-2017, 02:57 AM
If both reference pitches for A4, 440 and 432 Hz belonged to equal temperament tuning systems, the notes in 432 system would be almost 32 cent flatter than notes in 440 Hz system. That is say C(440) vs C(432), or any note put in place of C.

So in a group the 432Hz instrument would still feel "almost ok or playable" with 440Hz instruments, but very noticeably flatter. I think 10 cent pitch difference is barely noticeable between different instruments.
50 cent difference is out of tune as 100 cents is one semitone.

I just checked with my DaTuner app, but found out also a link as a double check: http://www.sengpielaudio.com/calculator-centsratio.htm

Lapyang
11-17-2017, 06:27 AM
Thanks. These are good info!!!

stevepetergal
11-17-2017, 06:22 PM
Mostly not good info.
A 432 is simply tuning your instrument a tiny bit lower than current standard. It's 8 cycles per second slower (lower) at your A, which is nowhere near 32 cents. You might want to tune you uke low to sound good with another instrument that has gone flat, or if you think it makes your ukulele sound better to your ear. But if you play alone, it really makes little to no difference. If you play in a group, don't do it. In addition, it has nothing to do with the temperment, which is built into the instrument. You can't tune a fretted instrument to any temperment other than the equal temperment (which will still not be quite perfect). If all you the play is ukulele or guitar, there's no need to study various tunings.
Yes, I'm a little touchy about false tuning info.

Jarmo_S
11-17-2017, 07:54 PM
Mostly not good info.
A 432 is simply tuning your instrument a tiny bit lower than current standard. It's 8 cycles per second slower (lower) at your A, which is nowhere near 32 cents. You might want to tune you uke low to sound good with another instrument that has gone flat, or if you think it makes your ukulele sound better to your ear. But if you play alone, it really makes little to no difference. If you play in a group, don't do it. In addition, it has nothing to do with the temperment, which is built into the instrument. You can't tune a fretted instrument to any temperment other than the equal temperment (which will still no be quite perfect). If all you the play is ukulele or guitar, there's no need to study various tunings.
Yes, I'm a little touchy about false tuning info.

Lol, I see you have already enough conversation going in your head, so I won't add anymore.
Maybe you you should read some, but I advice not going into any esoteric stuff that is going also around this 432 Hz. It is not healthy for you.

1890
11-17-2017, 09:00 PM
Also, while A = 440 Hz is currently the most common tuning used, in the orchestral/philharmonic/concert band world there are lots of groups that tune up slightly higher. A = 442 Hz is the next most common I'd heard of when I used to play in orchestras, and I've since heard that other's use frequencies from 441 to 445 Hz.

derbyhat
11-18-2017, 06:09 PM
Also, while A = 440 Hz is currently the most common tuning used, in the orchestral/philharmonic/concert band world there are lots of groups that tune up slightly higher. A = 442 Hz is the next most common I'd heard of when I used to play in orchestras, and I've since heard that other's use frequencies from 441 to 445 Hz.
Yup. It’s a marketing thing. By tuning a bit higher, audiences walk away thinking that the orchestra “sounded brighter” and therefore better. Tunings have slowly crept up over the decades, such that folks with really old string instruments can’t use them in group settings because the increased tensions would cause damage.

As others have said, do what you want for solo work. But tune to A440 in groups. And if you’re just a hobby player, tune A440 alone, too, so you can train your ear.

Jarmo_S
11-18-2017, 11:50 PM
But I don't think this thread has much to do with tuning as a group or tuning to play solo, it is a thread about finding out what happens when you tune to A=432Hz. It wont hurt your uke if you try it. Find the A= button on your tuner (if it has one) and set A=432Hz, and then retune. If you can't set A=, then see if you can just count 32cents down and tune all the open strings down 32cents. 432Hz turns out to be 32 cents lower than A=440Hz when you actually take the time to do the calculations. As a 1/2 tone is 50cents, tuning down 32cents s on the way to tuning the uke a 1/2 tone lower so the tension on the strings will be less and your wont be hurting the uke. It is close, but not quite the same tension as B tuning (not Bb tuning)

Bill1, tuning 32 cent down means 32 cents off from C6 tuning. Still almost playable I think. I have not tried, since every ukulule has their own sweet spot, but I am quite sure it can be any frequency. So I just keep mine in standard 440Hz. Try as close as I can :)
I would imagine it being also 68 cents off from B6, that 432Hz tuning, because 100 cents is one semitone.

stevepetergal
11-20-2017, 06:53 AM
Lol, I see you have already enough conversation going in your head, so I won't add anymore.
Maybe you you should read some, but I advice not going into any esoteric stuff that is going also around this 432 Hz. It is not healthy for you.

The original question was very simple and most reasonable. Tune my A down by 8 CPS? The answer is just as simple. Sure, if you like. Just be sure to tune all four strings to each other.

Reasons to do it are simple: playing with instrument(s) that is (are) flat, or you just because like to do so. Reason not to: If you play with others who are tuned to A440, you will sound out of tune.

Respectfully, I have done a great deal of reading on the subject of tuning. From Ditson and Gearman to Jorgenson and Hermann Smith. Even some writings of J.S. Bach, who was probably the ultimate authority on tuning and the temperaments. I've tuned pianos in homes, music colleges, places of worship, and concert halls. I've even tuned temperaments other than the Equal a couple of times (admittedly with the book in front of me, because the final results of historic tunings are not as testable as I like, making it impossible for me to attest to my accuracy).

My post was intended to discourage ukulele players from wasting time thinking about equal temperament, much less any notion of the esoteric. The fixed frets eliminate any possibility whatsoever of utilizing alternate temperaments. In addition, tuning four strings with fixed frets is far too simple for such consideration. My advice is always the same: Tune your ukulele and start playing.