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Peterjens
12-02-2017, 04:30 PM
Just wondering what your thoughts are when considering selling or keeping your 'ukes. I started playing in 2013 and continued until about late 2015 but then stopped. I thought playing would be something I would do during retirement but the thrill is gone. I occasionally pick up a 'uke that rests on the coffee table and strum a song or tow but my days of jamming for an hour are past.

So here I sit with a collection of 'ukes. I don't need the money although I could sell a couple for a set of Callaway irons (my new passion) but in the back of my mind I think that since most of the 'ukes are vintage they have the chance to hold or better yet rise in value if I keep them. No one in my family is the least bit interested in playing 'uke, at least not now.

So, all you sellers/keepers out there, what pivotal thoughts compel you to sell or keep?

EDW
12-02-2017, 05:35 PM
I tend to sell things off that I am not using to simplify my life, clear out clutter, whatever. I don't want to hang on stuff just to have it.

Choirguy
12-02-2017, 05:53 PM
Great question. I have only given away or sold 4 ukuleles so far—a Cordoba 15CM to a family member, two Enya Mahogany laminates that were $20 to family members (bought as gifts) and my Pono Pro Classic (sold on UU). With the Pono, I loved how it looked and it played great. I played my less impressive (visually) Opio Tenor (Sapele) more. When a used Acacia Opio Concert came up in UU, I had to buy it (and I love it) and I had to be honest about how much I was playing the Pono and sold it. No regrets.

I was basically given an Aklot Concert for review—and I would recommend it although their business model caused Barry Maz to pull his review. Anyway, I like it—but at Thanksgiving my niece, who is going into worship music, saw the two ukuleles I gave to family members and said, “I have been wanting to buy a ukulele.” So my wife asked me if we could buy another Enya laminate to give away—and they aren’t $20 any more (probably never again). Then I remembered the Aklot and told my wife we could give her that, with a actual shoulder strap and new tuner. My wife was worried that I was giving up a personal item.

Honestly, now that I have some very nice instruments (no true K Brand), I could easily go down to my two Opios, my Martin S1, my Outdoor Ukulele, and my Bonanza Ameoba Tenor. Everything else could go if needed. So maybe some things will pop up here on UU. Probably not.

And I’m not done shopping—just done for a while.

Croaky Keith
12-02-2017, 11:06 PM
Why do I hang on to my ukes?
(I've been learning to play harmonicas lately.)
Because I'll return to playing them again.

I may not be as involved with the Seasons threads as I was, but it is nice to pick up a uke to play a simple tune on it, just for the difference. Trying to learn too many instruments is my problem, since I found out that I could actually play one. :)

Over my 18 months of uking, I amassed quite a few - I needed to find what was right for me.
I have found what I like now, & they are the ones that I use the most.
(Even my UAS has likely stopped. ;) )

I gave away 6 of my lower priced ukes, because I liked the thought that someone else could get to enjoy them, & they weren't worth the hassle of trying to sell.

So here I sit, still with quite a selection to choose from, & I like to give them all a turn every now & again, though I pick up my small bodied tenors, or my long neck sopranos the most, I sometimes plug in an electric & give the built in effects of my amp an airing. :cool:

Graham Greenbag
12-03-2017, 12:34 AM
“So, all you sellers/keepers out there, what pivotal thoughts compel you to sell or keep?”

I know that I keep too much stuff in my life and think that it does hold me back to some extent. However I’m not good at selling things and, as I mostly manage to live well within my means, I don’t need the cash. Keeping stuff does enable me to return to past hobbies and interests after a few years or decades, so it gives you flexibility. That same stuff though takes up physical space and ties up cash too that could be better used in other ways. There’s a balance point between those two situations and it’s differerent for us all. The vintage Ukes that you have might hold or appreciate in value, alternatively your estate might later sell them at a clearance price whereas a sale by you now would have a much better long term result, they might also degrade in storage too or the market might collapse (stuff like that happens). To secure the situation it might be wisest to sell the vintage Ukes, or most of them, now - to me that has a plus of enabling other folk to enjoy them now and actively maintain them for future users.

I don’t play expensive Ukes but I have given away several, it makes space in my life and home for other things and they have given joy to others. Following my own advice is a challenge, but in moderation I suggest selling some of the long unused stuff that’s either taking up the most space or tying up the most cash to give room in your life for other stuff.

DownUpDave
12-03-2017, 02:26 AM
Your situation is a bit different than the usual buyer/seller as you are drifting away from the ukulele towards golf. I did the opposite, I was a golfaholic who found salvation in the ukulele:p

I have bought and sold a lot of ukuleles. The ones I have kept through all the buying and selling have met all these criteria in order.

#1 is sound, I have to absolutely love the sound.
#2 is playability because if I can't play it well it will not sound good
#3 is looks, coming from a woodworking background ukes with beautiful high quality woods capture my heart.

So deciding on what ukes you should keep, make your own list of "criteria" and see how the instruments you own place themselves.

Xtradust
12-03-2017, 03:57 AM
It’s tough. I have a tendency to hoard. (Happy miser) So, I work extra hard at moving things out. If I gave it up, I’d only keep one.

Down Up Dick
12-03-2017, 04:01 AM
I like to buy expensive stuff in stores if possible. All my ukes, though not particularly expensive to some of you, were bought in stores. I usta go to a store (2 or 3 good ones nearby), pick one out, give it a try in the store, and then, if I liked it okay, I’d buy it. If it needed some adjustment, I’d take it back and have it done, usually free. I still have all of them including two banjoleles which I consider “little banjos” now.

My banjos and a mandobanjo are a different story though. I’ve had to buy them from the internet. I really like to deal with Elderly but I’ve bought from Amazon too. Most of of them are Gold Tones, which I like a lot, but I have a good Deering too. I hate to buy all the same kind, but I’m lookin’ at a very nice Gold Tone 5 string A scale now. Banjos cost much more than ukes, so I try to be more careful.

I’ve had very good luck so far, and I still own, and play, all that I’ve bought. I’d probably sell 1 or 2 of them, but I’m not working at it. I don’t like my red Flea or one of my banjoleles, but they play okay.

I really believe that it’s the player that’s important and not the instrument. Some are good whatever they play. :old:

DaveY
12-03-2017, 06:38 AM
I ask myself these questions (but not aloud, of course):

1) Have I stopped playing it regularly?

2) Do I no longer look forward to playing it?

3) Does it essentially duplicate something I already have?

4) Will selling it help me justify buying something else (not necessarily another ukulele, but definitely something music-related).

If I answer “yes” to two of those, I start writing up an ad and taking photos. (At least that’s the best-case scenario.)

AlohaKine
12-03-2017, 12:42 PM
You think these people have a thought process? LOL

They're all just crazy Uke players. ;)

I just posted this in fun, I couldn't resist. :shaka:

http://content.bandzoogle.com/users/RedHotHornDawgs/images/content/crazy-thinking-cap.jpg

besley
12-03-2017, 01:36 PM
......
And I’m not done shopping—just done for a while.

Since you don't yet own a banjo uke, you obviously are NOT done shopping! (Even though Tony would never forgive you.)

Ukulele Eddie
12-03-2017, 01:44 PM
I have enjoyed experiencing a lot of different ukes over the last 5-6 users (more than 50). On the other hand, I don't like having stuff I don't use much. I keep four "at hand" and the others are stored in a closet. So I periodically rotate the four that I keep out. So far, I have found that about 12 ukes is the most I can play enough that I don't feel guilty about not using them. I expect to always keep one spot for rotating ukes. Having amassed some pretty amazing ukes that cannot be easily replaced, it is getting harder and harder for me to let them go, though I have in fact let several very special ukes go. I've come to realize that there are many more very special ukes than my current limit of 12, so I cannot have them all. ;-)

If for financial reasons I had to get down to 3-4 ukes max, it would be a very, very hard decision. It's very possible given the nature of my work, so I'm often asking myself, "Self, which 'x' ukes which I keep if I had to pare down to that number?" ;-)

janeray1940
12-03-2017, 04:15 PM
My thought process with keeping/selling ukes is pretty much applicable to all possessions - in general, if it hasn't served a purpose in three months, I tend to think of selling/donating/passing on to a more appreciative owner. But then I live in a 250-square-foot house where this line of thinking is pretty much necessary to maintaining sanity!

I've never owned more than 6 ukes at any given time - in fact, that's what I own now, and I feel like it's too many. I'm considering re-homing one or two of them but for various reasons this time around I'm breaking my three-month rule and going with "when the time is right, I'll sell."

Choirguy
12-03-2017, 05:17 PM
Since you don't yet own a banjo uke, you obviously are NOT done shopping! (Even though Tony would never forgive you.)

I do have a Kala Concert Banjolele. I just wouldn’t have to keep it like the others.

LarryS
12-04-2017, 12:54 AM
Its my thought processes after selling instruments that worries me... I'm starting to regret getting rid of that Squier strat that I had...

Joyful Uke
12-04-2017, 11:04 AM
" in the back of my mind I think that since most of the 'ukes are vintage they have the chance to hold or better yet rise in value if I keep them."

I don't know how the ukulele market is (or will be) for vintage ukuleles, but this was just in an article on guitars:
http://acousticguitar.com/celebrated-vintage-guitar-store-to-close-this-weekend/

"Vintage guitar sales have dropped by 20 to 30 percent in the last two years, says Umanov, and young buyers are increasingly shopping online. “To put it in very simple terms, the business model has changed.” “If you want to sell guitars, you have to have less expensive stuff—new or old—which is less expensive for a variety of potential reasons. I’m not interested in it.” "

Something to consider, at least, is that the market can change, (for better or worse.)

I don't own any vintage ukuleles, and am actively playing, but my approach is that if I'm not likely to give a ukulele much playing time, I bet there is someone else who will be delighted to have that ukulele. As I've experimented with different ukuleles, I've found that some are more comfortable for me to play than others, and the less comfortable ones don't get as much use. But, they're likely perfect for someone else, and it's a shame to let them go to waste.

Croaky Keith
12-04-2017, 10:35 PM
I'd only get an old uke if it was an exceptional player, & I certainly wouldn't pay a high price for a pre used uke.

It's old, like clothes/shoes, it's been used, it's wearing out - may take a few years, but it is still wearing out - much rather have a new one. :)

Down Up Dick
12-06-2017, 05:42 AM
I'd only get an old uke if it was an exceptional player, & I certainly wouldn't pay a high price for a pre used uke.

It's old, like clothes/shoes, it's been used, it's wearing out - may take a few years, but it is still wearing out - much rather have a new one. :)

I agree. I’m really picky when buying things, and I usually enjoy what I finally get. The internet kinda limits that now, but I guess we just can’t always shop good stores.

I’ve always kept whatever I’ve bought (so far). I may not love it, but I don’t hate it. Old stuff is old . . . :old:

MopMan
12-06-2017, 07:24 AM
So far, hoarding is the name of the game. But that's easy for now: I've only got a handful of instruments. I imagine I'll begin unloading as soon as I find I have a sufficient number of instruments that it becomes unwieldy or inconvenient to own them all.

Rllink
12-06-2017, 09:58 AM
I haven't sold any ukuleles, but I have given two of them away. My justification was that I didn't want them anymore.

niwenomian
12-06-2017, 10:18 AM
... 250-square-foot house


...6 ukes

Wow! I bet there are music stores with fewer ukes per square foot. With space at such a premium, I imagine each is distinctive enough to justify it's spot.

janeray1940
12-06-2017, 12:37 PM
Wow! I bet there are music stores with fewer ukes per square foot. With space at such a premium, I imagine each is distinctive enough to justify it's spot.

Ha, there probably are :) Mine are really just garden-variety off the shelf Kamakas and Kiwayas, but all are really good examples of their particular size and style. One beach uke, three sopranos (one longneck) that are daily players, and two concerts - it's those latter two that aren't getting played and I'm on the fence about, since I tend to go through soprano-only or concert-only phases. My soprano-only phase has lasted extra long this time around though.

I did have a bit of a reality check today, in that I'm 8 miles away from a fast-moving wildfire and in my head I went through my checklist of what to take if the fire jumps the freeway and heads my way and I'm only able to grab two ukes and my cat with my two hands!

JJFN
12-06-2017, 12:54 PM
Ha, there probably are :) Mine are really just garden-variety off the shelf Kamakas and Kiwayas, but all are really good examples of their particular size and style. One beach uke, three sopranos (one longneck) that are daily players, and two concerts - it's those latter two that aren't getting played and I'm on the fence about, since I tend to go through soprano-only or concert-only phases. My soprano-only phase has lasted extra long this time around though.

I did have a bit of a reality check today, in that I'm 8 miles away from a fast-moving wildfire and in my head I went through my checklist of what to take if the fire jumps the freeway and heads my way and I'm only able to grab two ukes and my cat with my two hands!

Be safe. It's a scary situation.

janeray1940
12-06-2017, 01:20 PM
Be safe. It's a scary situation.

Thanks! I think the worst for us is going to be air quality and traffic due to the freeway closure, but yeah - pretty scary.

somethingclever
12-06-2017, 08:01 PM
Duplicates are typically the first to go. But it's easy to find lots of small differences between similar instruments...
I tend to feel bad if something sits in the case for an extended period of time. That usually promts some selling.
Mix all that together with a healthy dose of UAS and before you know it, pictures are being taken.

Nickie
12-07-2017, 03:03 AM
Thanks! I think the worst for us is going to be air quality and traffic due to the freeway closure, but yeah - pretty scary.

Jane, play it safe, take the cat and all the ukes and get out early. I hope you have someplace to go hide from this miserable fire!
Please let us know you're okay when the smoke clears.

Peterjens
12-07-2017, 04:55 AM
OP here. Thanks for your thought processes.
My playing turned into collecting quickly - primarily owning examples of 'ukulele history. Thoughts of who might have played each 'uke still entertain me when I play them. So I'm thinking I should take the 'ukes out of their cases and display them instead of selling them.

Down Up Dick
12-07-2017, 05:38 AM
OP here. Thanks for your thought processes.
My playing turned into collecting quickly - primarily owning examples of 'ukulele history. Thoughts of who might have played each 'uke still entertain me when I play them. So I'm thinking I should take the 'ukes out of their cases and display them instead of selling them.

Yes, I really enjoy looking at all my instruments. I’ve always wanted a music room where I could display them, and now I have it. I wish it was bigger, but I have the annex (bedroom) too where I actually play them.

All my gig bags and cases are hanging in the garage. Looking at them is not nearly so enjoyable. :old:

SoloRule
12-07-2017, 10:00 AM
I have no principle. If someone wants it bad enough. I will sell!
I am a bad mommy. I sell my children !

janeray1940
12-07-2017, 03:58 PM
Jane, play it safe, take the cat and all the ukes and get out early. I hope you have someplace to go hide from this miserable fire!
Please let us know you're okay when the smoke clears.

Oh, I'm fine - other side of the freeway from the evacuation zone and down in the flatlands. But it's still a little too close for comfort. I've lived with SoCal fires all of my life but I think this one is the closest to home that has ever happened. That combined with knowing what happened in northern California has me a bit hypervigilant - I think I've got a plan in place, which hopefully I'll never need to use!

Ukecaster
12-07-2017, 04:52 PM
Yeah, it must scary to live somewhere knowing you need to plan for a go-bag & a gig bag (or 2). Tell me that in February, when I'm shoveling out from a blizzard ;)

RafterGirl
12-09-2017, 04:12 AM
I've been playing for 8 months and I've been through 7 ukuleles. 5 were purchased, one was a gift, and one I won in a prize raffle at a ukulele festival. At the moment I own 2 with a third being built. I have gifted 2, and sold 3. One I sold was a duplicate of a size I already have, and it wasn't played much. The other two I sold weren't a good fit for me in overall size or in neck size. I gifted my Waterman to a teenager, and I gifted my starter concert to a friend who's just getting started.

I've had a bit of the UAS bug since I started playing. By trial and error, I think I'm refining my needs & desires in size and sound. My goal at the moment is to have 3-4 ukes that get played regularly, each with a specific purpose.

ukulelekarcsi
12-13-2017, 01:41 AM
I think I have a dozen, but must have owned and sold at least twice or three times that amount.

What triggers the sell, is the question what other ukulele could be bought with the sale... And on a more serious note, 2 years of almost no playing also crosses a line.

Rllink
12-13-2017, 02:51 AM
I think I have a dozen, but must have owned and sold at least twice or three times that amount.

What triggers the sell, is the question what other ukulele could be bought with the sale... And on a more serious note, 2 years of almost no playing also crosses a line.Just curious and I don't want to put you on the spot, but have you bought and sold ukuleles in the past two years that you have not been playing much, and if so, keeping with the original post, what has prompted it?

ukulelekarcsi
12-21-2017, 11:33 PM
Just curious and I don't want to put you on the spot, but have you bought and sold ukuleles in the past two years that you have not been playing much, and if so, keeping with the original post, what has prompted it?

Yes I did, and even do. The list is long, but I could give a few examples.
- A Regal tiple wwas sold off. Although it was very nice, rather special and I even used it extensively a few years back, it was quite loud and jangly, sung better in D than in C which I'm not that used to, and therefor rested in the attic for a very long time, save for 2 or 3 short 1 minute strum to remind me of it and its playing condition.
- A walnut flea was bought and sold. I had flea ukes before, and liked them, but I'm mainly into older instruments. Still I bought it, because it was a cheap second-hand, it had a wooden fretboard and I thought I neede it to lend out in the ukulele classes I teach. The last bit explains why it got sold as well - a student took a liking to it, and it turns out 'having instruments for lent' is a bad argument to buy more.
- An old Martin style O with a transpanted back. In fact, the back was a heavy wooden plywood board, cut to shape and stuck on. It played well, and looked OK from the front, but there were reasons for selling it. The prime one being that I'm not really attracted to the Martin sound myself, hard to explain, but it ended up not being played a lot. Another selling point was that I was planning on replacing the back myself, and never got to it. And a third that someone offered a good price for a rather battered Martin.

Does that give you and idea of what prompted it?

captain-janeway
12-22-2017, 07:34 AM
Thanks OP. I've been going through the same thing. Bought my first uke about a year ago because it sounded great, but as I learned to play I found out a tenor size was just too big for my hands. If I could put a concert neck on it I'd keep it. It's so deep and rich sounding.

May try to do a trade for a banjo uke.

rubykey
12-22-2017, 09:21 AM
This year my ukulele journey involved more buying and selling than I anticipated. An opportunity to get a Kala travel soprano propped up. I hated the heavy gear tuners so switch them for friction tuners and now it's a cute little companion. I wanted a good soprano to keep next to my bed because I had been playing my Mahalo pineapple every day and thought every day should be something special. Blue Frog maple fills that bill. It's beautiful it plays easy and it sounds dreamy very clear and harp like. That put the count up to 8 and it made me ill thinking about my stash. I was able to rehome the stunning Barron River when I realized I didn't like having such an expensive ukulele.If I have to store it in a case and worry about getting scratches on it it's not practical for me. I had a laminate kaka that was a precursor to Enya. It was beautiful, and sounded great had unique tortoise shell binding with open headstock. The neck was wide which is why it wasn't comfortable for my small hands. I sold it to a guitar player and she loves it. Interestingly she never asked me the name of the brand:-) How do you advertise a kaka ukulele? When an opportunity to purchase a used Loprinzi came up I took that imputus to sell an unplayed opio acacia since my ear does not appreciate that tone wood.

Since selling was so successful I decided to Craigslist my 22 pound piano accordion. I was never going to pick up that beast again. It had a lovely mussette tone and went to the accordion guy who was in heaven the moment he squeezed. I think instruments have a way of finding themselves to the right homes. I love the stories connected to the journey. Selling is part of the journey:-) The joy continues when the exchange was positive. Instruments are meant to be played. If you're not playing it pass it on. Hoarding weighs you down.

Iulia
03-01-2018, 07:37 AM
I think instruments have a way of finding themselves to the right homes. I love the stories connected to the journey. Selling is part of the journey:-) The joy continues when the exchange was positive. Instruments are meant to be played. If you're not playing it pass it on. Hoarding weighs you down.

Hi I know the thread slightly old and I don't have anything particular to add to help the OP but I just wanted to say I have always felt exactly that. I've bought, acquired, sold more instruments (not just uke lots of different stuff) in my life than I can begin to care to remember, and that's it totally. They are meant to be played. If you aren't playing it let it go.

No offence to collectors that's just me ;)

Dansimpson
03-01-2018, 11:31 AM
Hi I know the thread slightly old and I don't have anything particular to add to help the OP but I just wanted to say I have always felt exactly that. I've bought, acquired, sold more instruments (not just uke lots of different stuff) in my life than I can begin to care to remember, and that's it totally. They are meant to be played. If you aren't playing it let it go.

No offence to collectors that's just me ;)

Agree totally, I've only been playing uke for about 10 months, bought 8, sold 3, gave one away, all of those disposed of didn't suit me for whatever reason, but I aint keeping what I aint playing. Got another one lined up, buit also considering getting rid of another, as it doesn't get used as much as it should.

70sSanO
03-02-2018, 12:21 PM
Interesting situation for the OP. I have only sold 1 ukulele on the past 11 years of playing. I've loaned them out from time to time, but still have nearly all of them. What is interesting to me is that I have had a number of other obsessions since I began with the ukulele in 2007... cycling, (built a couple of mountain bikes but more road these days), sailing (boat sitting in the garage for the last few years), did the Callaway thing (even got fitted by them but not getting a lot of use), and my latest foray... back to surfing.

But for me, the ukulele has been that one love that is always just there. Regardless of what wild hair I am pursuing, it just patiently waits for me. It is a refuge for me. But, I feel fortunate because I was able to find a style of playing that I really enjoyed so it was more than learning chords or a few songs and then the newness wears off. Years ago when I played guitar I would sing, but I just didn't connect that way with the uke. But I discovered playing melodies, and that has been my niche. Music can be so medicinal, but I think each person has to find that connection.

John

kohanmike
03-02-2018, 01:54 PM
When I first started playing the uke 4 1/2 years ago, in the first year had 16, then I got a really good Kala solid cedar top and it got me to be more discriminating. I analyzed my collection and decided to keep only the ones that had the most projection and played the best, which brought it down to 4. Since then, in the last 3 years, I've added 4 more, all of which are better choices than any I ended up selling or gifting.

8 tenor cutaway ukes, 3 acoustic bass ukes, 8 solid body bass ukes, 8 mini electric bass guitars

• Donate to The Ukulele Kids Club, they provide ukuleles to children's hospital music therapy programs. http://.www.theukc.org
• Member The CC Strummers: https://www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/videos (https://www.youtube.com/user/CCStrummers/videos)

spongeuke
03-03-2018, 08:03 AM
I keep going around in circles lately. My latest effort to sell a couple Vintage Martins resulted in no sales. The collection is from a buy what you like thought process followed several years latter by a herd thinning that didn't really effect the Martins that much. I know that the old ukuleles are not as coveted as new ones yet I think that some how that will change. A price point reduction doesn't set well with my thinking.
I'm going back to rescue operations on the old Martins I've accumulated and depend on that process to reward me and not expect any financial rewards.

Patchenu
03-03-2018, 12:04 PM
I am in the process of thinning the number of ukes that I have. I am struggling to get down to about 12. There are some that play better than others, some sound better and some are just way more attractive. I am keeping the ones I have bonded with but I have several that I'm on the fence about but there are a few I never bonded with and those are the first ones to go. They are all great instruments but I think having around 12 is the right number for me and I want these other wonderful instruments to be played and not just collect dust.

Regmon
03-03-2018, 05:40 PM
I guess for me, I would be considered a " crazy Uke man " .... In a very strange sense, I consider them as my kids or personal possessions.... All the ones I own are very different from each other, even my four two Sopraninos and four Sopranissimo ..I learned a hard lesson years back... I sold a guitar because I wasn't playing it much over the years, I knew as soon as I sold it I would probably regret it. Over the years after that, I wanted to play even if it was just few a few min but I couldn't because I didn't have a guitar. It wasn't until years later when I was able to play music again... If I dont have to feed it or take care of it, and if it doesn't take up alot of space, why not keep it...

Rllink
03-05-2018, 05:16 AM
Your situation is a bit different than the usual buyer/seller as you are drifting away from the ukulele towards golf. I did the opposite, I was a golfaholic who found salvation in the ukulele:p

I have bought and sold a lot of ukuleles. The ones I have kept through all the buying and selling have met all these criteria in order.

#1 is sound, I have to absolutely love the sound.
#2 is playability because if I can't play it well it will not sound good
#3 is looks, coming from a woodworking background ukes with beautiful high quality woods capture my heart.

So deciding on what ukes you should keep, make your own list of "criteria" and see how the instruments you own place themselves.
I was going back through the thread again. I think it is an interesting comment in that I think that a lot of people go all out on one thing, then get tired of it and move on to the next one thing. One can have more than a single interest. But in regards to ukuleles, I never buy one with the intention to get rid of it.

hoosierhiver
03-05-2018, 05:39 AM
In regards to most everything I own, if I haven't picked it up in a year, I can live without it.

hendulele
03-05-2018, 07:20 AM
I've been through about 20 ukes since I started 4 1/2 years ago. I've shed some because they never really sounded right (probably operator error) or for purely utilitarian reasons -- like the Pete Howlett tenor I sold (and wish I had back!!!) because I hated having to leave it in the case all the time and couldn't admire it.

Now, every one in the collection has a purpose. The bari, so I can play open tuning and linear tuning. The Firefly because sometimes you need a banjo. The Makala because it has a pickup and I can plug it in if that strikes my fancy.

The only all-solid instrument I own is an Ohana soprano mahogany. It may be my best-playing, best-sounding uke but it has to stay humidified any time the heat is on in our drafty house. Irreplaceable for the price and the joy it brings, even so.

I'll pick up any of the others any time, depending on the mood. Much like Mike and other posters, if I find myself not playing something for a long time (more than a few months), then maybe it's time to move on.

If I were to add to the collection, I'd get a 6-string or another 8-string, just for the jangle. (My first uke was a Kala 8-string, I really had no idea what I was doing, and I was happy to re-home it.) If I did, something would have to go, however.

Croaky Keith
03-05-2018, 07:42 AM
........ But in regards to ukuleles, I never buy one with the intention to get rid of it.

Quite so. :)

I never have the feeling that I might get rid of it when I buy one - & if I hadn't of collected so many of the cheaper ones, I wouldn't have given any away.

(I may not be playing them as much as before, but I'm sure I'll come back to them once I've cracked playing my harmonicas. ;) )

Ukecaster
03-05-2018, 08:03 AM
...I know that the old ukuleles are not as coveted as new ones yet I think that some how that will change...

Dunno, seems like old ukes, especially Martins, are highly coveted, way more than new Martins. Hope your sales prospects improve, as you certainly seem to be passionate about them, and restore them lovingly.

70sSanO
03-05-2018, 11:48 AM
In regards to most everything I own, if I haven't picked it up in a year, I can live without it.

Not me. If it was something I did well enough to enjoy I'll hold onto it. My surfboards are a great example. When our boys were growing up we were in the water all the time. After they were gone the boards sat in the garage for years. One of our boys got me back into the water and I discovered something... there are a lot less people out there during the week. This is pretty nice. I had lost some weight over the years so the boards work even better for me. Had I sold them the money would have been long gone. And it is a little nostalgic to ride the same boards that I had ridden with our kids, especially when they come out to visit.

John

Jerryc41
03-08-2018, 02:13 AM
I should sell some, but I can't bring myself to part with them. I think there are three I might put up for sale - maybe.

As for buying, I like "beautiful," provided the quality is there. I've seen some for $1,500 that just don't appeal to me, but others for much less catch my eye - and my money. I spend hours reading and watching reviews before I finally buy a uke.

I made three cigar box ukes and one tenor, and I would never sell them (as if someone would want them:) )