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photoshooter
12-30-2017, 10:11 AM
I wanted to get a pedal or two to experiment with... that quickly lead to three, four... Mostly very inexpensive pedals just for play. But of course then I needed a pedalboard so I decided to make one. I drew it to be the smallest size I could get away with. A larger pedalboard would just make me buy more pedals ;) Not terribly sophisticated but gratifying nonetheless. The sides are 1" thick beech rabbeted so that the top shelves set inside. Top is baltic birch ply edged with paduak for a little visual interest. I put in and out jacks on the side and mounted a power supply underneath. I'm still waiting on a few more patch cables so I haven't wired it up yet.

I'm completely green when it comes to all of this stuff so I can't really discuss the finer points of each pedal :confused: However I can share that the Trio+ has a much smaller learning curve than what I imagined and it's a heckuva lot of fun!

photoshooter
12-30-2017, 10:31 AM
Lol! Thanks Campbell, I was thinking the same thing :)



Michael

Osprey
12-30-2017, 11:44 AM
That looks great, nice work. One day you will have to tell us more about the pedals. I am intrigued, but not sure where to start.

photoshooter
12-30-2017, 01:28 PM
Thank you.

“I am intrigued, but not sure where to start.”

That describes me as well. I’ve played with some of the pedals and some are new. I’m fumbling my way through it.

Brad Bordessa
12-30-2017, 02:26 PM
DIY is the only way to go. Build your own rules instead of fitting your gear into somebody else's design. And save a buck. A Pedaltrain doesn't even have built-in jacks!

Looks clean. What are the little ones?

photoshooter
12-30-2017, 02:46 PM
Donner pedals, very economical. From the left; Yellow Fall Delay pedal, Behringer Reverb, Donner Blues Drive, Compressor and Tuner.

dasuol
12-30-2017, 03:43 PM
That looks great! Elegantly simple design. I love the padauk accents. I had a couple pedals that quickly multiplied into about 8 a few years ago. I never got around to building a pedal board though. Those little Donner pedals are a lot of fun to play around with and an easy way to experiment with different effects.

Choirguy
12-30-2017, 04:29 PM
While I do not own any stomp boxes, I would recommend the website of Aron Nelson, a Hawaiian who has played with Chris Kamaka. In addition to his music skills, he also is a programmer having written the unrealBook app (PDF music reader—very good app).

http://www.diystompboxes.com/wpress/

ripock
12-30-2017, 05:01 PM
this thread abounds in awesomeness. Like others in this thread I have admissions to make. I have never played a guitar, I have never used a plectrum, and know nothing about electronic music. However I bought a 75 watt amp with built in "pedals" such as distortion, overdrive, flange, reverb, and delay. I supplemented with a fuzz pedal (Fuzz Factory Fat) and I love to wank around with my slide and movable chords. If I turn the volume up to "2" I am shaking the walls with my A blues progressions. It actually sounds like I know what I am doing. Those pedals really hide all my faults and if I do make a mistake, I just repeat the mistake and--presto--it is a motif! I have grown very fond of chucking strings to give a percussive rhythm which wasn't possible when playing acoustically. I am learning a lot about rock 'n' roll--namely that it is largely dependent on attitude and mojo, rather than pure proficiency. I don't mean to take anything away from the many people here whom I know have been professional musicians for 30+ years; I merely saying that as an acoustic instrumentalist I am completely a non-entity, but give me a few pedals and I am a little more than that.

photoshooter
12-30-2017, 05:54 PM
That looks great! Elegantly simple design. I love the padauk accents. I had a couple pedals that quickly multiplied into about 8 a few years ago. I never got around to building a pedal board though. Those little Donner pedals are a lot of fun to play around with and an easy way to experiment with different effects.

Thank you. I've been a woodworking hobbyist a lot longer than I've been an ukulele hobbyist :)
I view the Donner pedals as "appetizers" at $25 to $30 each. One of the main reasons I wanted to build a pedalboard was to tidy-up the power cord situation. It got messy having loose pedals all about and the cheaper pedals often don't include power cords so I was switching them out.



While I do not own any stomp boxes, I would recommend the website of Aron Nelson, a Hawaiian who has played with Chris Kamaka. In addition to his music skills, he also is a programmer having written the unrealBook app (PDF music reader—very good app).
http://www.diystompboxes.com/wpress/

Looks like a great resource, thanks!



If I turn the volume up to "2" I am shaking the walls with my A blues progressions. It actually sounds like I know what I am doing. Those pedals really hide all my faults and if I do make a mistake, I just repeat the mistake and--presto--it is a motif! I have grown very fond of chucking strings to give a percussive rhythm which wasn't possible when playing acoustically. .....

Thanks for the chuckle. I think we're in the same place. It's purely fun for me, almost a guilty pleasure. I love the purity of an acoustic stringed instrument but it's a lot of fun to be able to plug in and experiment on another level with an entirely different palette of sounds.

Booli
12-31-2017, 02:02 AM
Micheal brother -

I must say I very impressed with your timber skills.

I went the lazy and cheap route a while back. I have a bunch of pedals that I zip-tied to a Stanley 2 ft plastic pegboard square ($8) [that is meant for hanging tools on the wall] because I refuse to pay $100 for a Pedaltrain board or one of the nicer pre-made ones.

It looks something like one of these panels:

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71SUJfF2hqL._SX522_.jpg

It works fine for home use since I rarely need to move it.

However, since I got the Zoom MS-100 BT, which is a multi-effect pedal the size of a single pedal, I do not use the other effects much.

You've got some nice effects there, and they have a very nice home. I like that you can route the cables via the slots on the board, and when all finished you will likely not have a spaghetti mess of power & patch cords to contend with.

When you get around to fixing them with velcro, might I suggest to use less than you think you need on each pedal. Like only 1" squares at the corners.

I made the mistake of initially using a 2.5" wide x 4" long adhesive velcro strip on the back of each pedal, and once fixed down, trying to remove to reposition them required the use of a screwdriver as a lever to pry them off the board. Not fun.

I am happy to see you applying your timber skills to your music interest. This project in addition to your Cajon build looks very professional and I am looking forward to what you create in the next projects.

Thanks for sharing :)

photoshooter
12-31-2017, 03:30 AM
Good morning Booli my brother and thanks for your never-ending encouragement. Combining hobbies has been the ultimate therapy for me. I actually have several ukuleles on the workbench in various stages of completion but since they require a lot more care and attention than these other projects they patiently wait their turn. Since I'm not a gigging musician (and depending on your definition I may not be a musician at all ;) ) the pedalboard was mostly for convenience. Having everything set up at the ready with only one cable for power makes it a lot more fun to play and experiment. Velcro is the devil's tool :( There's no arguing it's usefulness but I have always found it annoying...maybe it's the sound? In any case I decided to try 3M Dual Lock Fastener for this project. It's sort of a "plastic velcro". I have a strip of it holding the power supply on the underside of the pedalboard and it seems to work wonderfully.

bariukish
12-31-2017, 06:01 AM
Great job with the craftsmanship on the petalboard. While surfing the internet yesterday, I stumbled across a 'Deal" at Sweetwater for a Digitech Trio for $49.95. Although dumb as a post on most things involving electronic tech, I punched the "order" button. I've always wanted the sound of bass and percussion background to my tenor and baritone strumming. I hope this thing works with simple ukulele stuff as well as guitars. Not to hijack your thread but I certainly would appreciate any comments re your experience this device. Thanks.

dasuol
12-31-2017, 07:26 AM
Please share some more photos when you've got it all wired up and ready to go.

photoshooter
12-31-2017, 07:48 AM
While surfing the internet yesterday, I stumbled across a 'Deal" at Sweetwater for a Digitech Trio for $49.95. Although dumb as a post on most things involving electronic tech, I punched the "order" button. I've always wanted the sound of bass and percussion background to my tenor and baritone strumming. I hope this thing works with simple ukulele stuff as well as guitars. Not to hijack your thread but I certainly would appreciate any comments re your experience this device. Thanks.


Not a hijack at all, in fact I would welcome more conversation on the topic since I have lots to learn.
I think $49 for the Trio is a no-brainer. The one I have is the Trio+ which adds looping functionality. I've had it for less than a month and although I didn't put it through any exhaustive testing I did get several opportunities to play with it. I must say it's exactly what I had hoped it would be. You "teach" it a chord progression and it comes up with accompaniment. You have the ability to fine tune the genre (rock, blues etc) as well as the tempo. As I get more familiar with it I'd be happy to post more observations. I would also love it if any forum members who use a Trio would chime in with their thoughts.

photoshooter
12-31-2017, 07:48 AM
Please share some more photos when you've got it all wired up and ready to go.


Absolutely!

quiltingshirley
12-31-2017, 08:36 AM
I’ve seen folks use pedals before but they’ve never looked as good as yours does. I doubt I could ever figure it out but your box would sure make me look good. LOL

jer
12-31-2017, 09:32 AM
That looks really nice. Good job. :cool:

photoshooter
12-31-2017, 05:32 PM
Thanks to both of you. I’m not that great an ukulele player so maybe the pedalboard will draw attention away from me ;)

Booli
01-01-2018, 04:20 AM
...I would also love it if any forum members who use a Trio would chime in with their thoughts.

I have the Trio+ high on my wishlist, but it will be some time before I have one in hand. Right now I am just too burdened with other things to put in the time to make good use of it.

Thus, I will have to rely upon the hands-on testimonials of other folks here, and live vicariously through all of you.

Digitech has been making really nice gear over the past 30 yrs or so, and the accompaniment tech inside this magic box is based upon the computer program aptly called 'Band-In-A-Box' which I am a huge fan of and have been using consistently and upgrading all the way from to version 3.0 which used to run on MS-DOS and required an external MIDI adapter for the computer (I used a Roland MPU-401) as well as external sound modules to create the accompaniment. Back then I had a Roland MT-32, as well as a Roland LAPC-1 and would feed the output of these each into a discreet channel on my Tascam 4-track "portastudio" cassette recorder.

More info about 'Band-In-A-Box' here: http://www.pgmusic.com/ (Mac and Windows versions currently)

The other hardware I had used is all regarded 'vintage' and pretty much eclipsed by modern software instruments and their versatility, as well as for audio fidelity.

PG Music is a great company, and back in 1992 when I saw an ad for the program in the back of 'Electronic Musician' magazine, and called them to order the software (ordering online was not a thing yet), the owner and main programmer Peter Gannon (hence the PG in PG Music) actually answered the phone and happily took my order. We've come a long way since then. :)

Sorry for the digression, but I just wanted to give a historical perspective on the 'magic little box' that is rendered in the Trio series.

photoshooter
01-01-2018, 05:23 AM
Some of this stuff can get pricey and hard to justify when there are still ukes on my wishlist. I've had great luck monitoring Reverb and Craig's list for used, minty pedals. I was able to score the larger pedals and avoid paying retail.

Thanks for the history lesson and for the PG Music link. Looks very interesting...

Booli
01-01-2018, 05:59 AM
Brother Michael -

Yet another tangent question, and no disrespect to your wonderful pedalboard, but thought this might be of interest to others so did not send via PM...

With the Trio, can you have it 'learn' your chords, and then stop the playback, and then start it up and have it play like 4 bars in that progression without you actually playing yourself?

My thinking is that it would be nice to train it, and then hit record for a video and have it just already know the song, since it seems like with many loopers, the first 32 bars of any video demos, they show the person having to first build up all the loops and this would be tedious for the audience watching the video or during a live gig...

It would be nice if you could build up a library or playlist in advance and just run down the list without training the chords or building up the loops in front of others, while they patiently wait for the meat of the song to begin (I have nightmare visions of 'The Blues Brothers' movie with needing a screen-wall of chicken wire to fend off the beer bottles and raw eggs being thrown at the stage if your intro segment goes on too long)

So I'm just thinking out loud on this.

It would be handy instead of just pre-recording your backup tracks and then having them play out your PA or amp from your phone, which would not allow any changes during performance, but with the Trio, you could change amongst the parts if you wanted to play the bridge or chorus part again on the fly every so often...

photoshooter
01-01-2018, 07:51 AM
Yes sir Brother B, I believe it can do all of that. I don't have all of the specs in front of me but if I recall correctly it can remember 12 songs on an SD card with 5 parts to each song. So you can shuffle through the intro, verse, chorus etc. If you were inclined to swap out SD cards you would have a lot more songs at your disposal.

AlanASmith
01-02-2018, 11:36 PM
Thanks for inspiration for new year. Building by myself a pedalboard is definitely my amazing next project.
Can you provide an image that show how your cables connect together and how to be well-organized with all of these?
Also, what do you means of 'inexpensive'? what's is the best affordable budget range?

I have found cool post that conduct an interview with some high-reputation builders on the market. It's good to hear some direct insights from each builders.
https://shredaddict.com/diy-pedalboard/

There are some key takeaways I would like to take here and discuss:
1. Anyone try Aluminum? That's weird made by Chris from CDW
2. Anything new alternatives to hold the pedals away from using Velcro?
3. Is light-weight actually a good trade-off? Because when playing on live stage, a heavily steady wood will keep your pedal not vibrating and 'moving around'

Booli
01-03-2018, 04:01 AM
Yes sir Brother B, I believe it can do all of that. I don't have all of the specs in front of me but if I recall correctly it can remember 12 songs on an SD card with 5 parts to each song. So you can shuffle through the intro, verse, chorus etc. If you were inclined to swap out SD cards you would have a lot more songs at your disposal.

Ok - sounds great. Thanks for the confirmation. eventually I will get a Trio+ and then will likely need to create another pedalboard...thanking you for sharing the inspiration of your design, of course :)

Booli
01-03-2018, 04:09 AM
...2. Anything new alternatives to hold the pedals away from using Velcro?...

I have used zip-ties (aka tie-wraps) in the past if not using velcro.

The disadvantage to zip-ties is that you cannot remove or re-arrange pedals easily with zip-ties unless you cut them and then put new ones, which is wasteful to me, but may be a more rugged method of holding them on if you are constantly gigging with your pedalboard.

In a belt-and-suspenders approach, my pedals are currently fixed with BOTH velcro and zip-ties, even though I have not gigged with my pedalboard, mainly because I like to punish myself LOL (and also use zip-ties whenever/where-ever possible to fasten things down or hold things together)

Similarly, I've seen commercial pedalboards that have a sort of clamp system, like an L-bracket for each corner or for each side, and they are adjustable and need to be screwed down tight to hold. I avoided this myself because of both this being too fiddly a system for me, as well as adding to the weight and # of parts involved. They were also about 25% more expensive than boards without this system.

Zip-ties are cheap, Home Depot/Lowes/Walmart has them in a round container of ~1000 zip-ties for ~$8-10 USD.

Croaky Keith
01-03-2018, 05:16 AM
I re use zip ties constantly, just push that little bit that holds against the ratchet part, & gently undo them. ;)

photoshooter
01-03-2018, 08:44 AM
I'm almost finished securing and cabling all the pedals. I'll take some more pics and post them when I'm done. I'll also add a few observations from my experience.
I'm using 3M Dual Lock Fastener (www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JHKTDMA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1) to attach the pedals and so far I'm liking it much better than velcro.

Booli
01-03-2018, 10:13 AM
...I'm using 3M Dual Lock Fastener (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00JHKTDMA/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1) to attach the pedals and so far I'm liking it much better than velcro.

That stuff is kinda like a super-tuff velcro. Radio Shack used to sell the same/similar called 'SuperLock'.

Cautions about using too much still apply, more than a few square inched per pedal and they become very difficult to remove/reposition.

Also, lots of folks put at least 2 horizontal strips of velcro along the whole length of the wood slats going side-to-side, parallel to top and bottom edge of each slat (spaced apart to the edges), which allows you to re-arrange any pedal on the board, otherwise if you neatly fit each pedal with specific positions, and only the superlock set for that position, you need to remove the superlock as well later on.

Trust me, you will likely be changing things around later, otherwise, you could just use some Suguru, "Hard As Nails" in the caulking gun or silicone construction adhesive to attach the pedals to the board LOL....um, 'permanently'...

just some thoughts for you, but I am sure you will find the best way for your needs. :)

AlanASmith
01-13-2018, 12:14 AM
Thanks for inspiration for new year. Building by myself a pedalboard is definitely my amazing next project.
Can you provide an image that show how your cables connect together and how to be well-organized with all of these?
Also, what do you means of 'inexpensive'? what's is the best affordable budget range?

I have found cool post that conduct an interview with some high-reputation builders on the market. It's good to hear some direct insights from each builders.
https://shredaddict.com/diy-pedalboard/

There are some key takeaways I would like to take here and discuss:
1. Anyone try Aluminum? That's weird made by Chris from CDW
2. Anything new alternatives to hold the pedals away from using Velcro?
3. Is light-weight actually a good trade-off? Because when playing on live stage, a heavily steady wood will keep your pedal not vibrating and 'moving around'





I have used zip-ties (aka tie-wraps) in the past if not using velcro.

The disadvantage to zip-ties is that you cannot remove or re-arrange pedals easily with zip-ties unless you cut them and then put new ones, which is wasteful to me, but may be a more rugged method of holding them on if you are constantly gigging with your pedalboard.

In a belt-and-suspenders approach, my pedals are currently fixed with BOTH velcro and zip-ties, even though I have not gigged with my pedalboard, mainly because I like to punish myself LOL (and also use zip-ties whenever/where-ever possible to fasten things down or hold things together)

Similarly, I've seen commercial pedalboards that have a sort of clamp system, like an L-bracket for each corner or for each side, and they are adjustable and need to be screwed down tight to hold. I avoided this myself because of both this being too fiddly a system for me, as well as adding to the weight and # of parts involved. They were also about 25% more expensive than boards without this system.

Zip-ties are cheap, Home Depot/Lowes/Walmart has them in a round container of ~1000 zip-ties for ~$8-10 USD.

Phewww. After going around the town, I still stay with buying Velcro for this first time building because it seems to be the most simplest and cheap solution.

photoshooter
01-30-2018, 01:43 PM
I finally had a chance to finish this project. Somewhere along the way I seem to have picked up another pedal :roll eyes:

For anyone interested the pedals are:
Behring Reverb, Donner Yellow Fall Delay, Donner Tutti Love Chorus, Micro Pog, Donner Blues Drive,
Trio+, Donner Compressor, Donner Tuner, LR Baggs Para Acoustic
A Donner Power Supply is mounted on the underside of the pedalboard.

I used 3M Dual Lock to fasten the pedals to the board and am very pleased with it.

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frigiliana
01-30-2018, 09:38 PM
Love it you might get some commissions on the strength of your photos , i'd be interested in your findings on using a compressor with your uke photoshooter i've dipped my toe on one of these.

photoshooter
01-31-2018, 03:00 PM
Thanks frigiliana. This is all largely experimental for me. I'm still fumbling my way through it all, especially tweaking the settings on the compressor. But so far the results are positive. I'd be happy to report back as I gain a little more experience with this stuff.