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View Full Version : Baritone Uke with Arm Bevel and Sound Port - Picture Set



Allen
02-08-2018, 03:37 PM
I try to knock out an instrument for stock every time I start a new batch of custom builds. This one was in the last batch and I wanted to try my hand at an arm bevel. Last one I did was on a guitar about 10 years ago.

This is a 21.5" scale length baritone made from Australian Blackwood with a Yellow Cedar soundboard. Gidgee bindings and fret board. Very dark and curly Australian Blackwood peg head veneers. Rubner tuners K&K Aloha Twin pickup.

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Allen
02-08-2018, 03:39 PM
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Lapyang
02-08-2018, 03:52 PM
It is always a pleasure to look at your craftsmanship.
Do you think arm bevel is suitable for smaller instrument like a soprano or concert? Will it be necessary or an overkill?

sequoia
02-08-2018, 06:19 PM
I'm not a big fan of the arm bevel thing and thought it is a bit of a bling thing, but this is one of the first I've seen that I actually like. First of all it is small and doesn't ruin the lines. Some of these arm rest things seem enormous and to my eye ugly. Like some sort of growth coming out of the lower bout. This one seems to fit. Very nice ... Now you are a God of course when it comes to building Allen, but it looks to me that the slotted peghead looks a little too delicate and might be prone to catastrophic failure if that thing ever got dropped on its head. A little thin there perhaps? Maybe sailing a little close to the wind there? Just my thought. Looks great.

greenscoe
02-08-2018, 07:32 PM
"I try to knock out an instrument for stock every time I start a new batch of custom builds."

I would love to be able to 'knock out' something as beautiful as this once in a while: you seem to be able to do it every time you pick up a piece of wood!

Allen
02-08-2018, 07:45 PM
Now you are a God of course when it comes to building Allen, but it looks to me that the slotted peghead looks a little too delicate and might be prone to catastrophic failure if that thing ever got dropped on its head. A little thin there perhaps? Maybe sailing a little close to the wind there? Just my thought. Looks great.

If you could manage to break one of my headstocks then your the man. Scarf joint, veneer on both sides and Carbon Fiber truss rod into the head stock.

Allen
02-08-2018, 07:50 PM
It is always a pleasure to look at your craftsmanship.
Do you think arm bevel is suitable for smaller instrument like a soprano or concert? Will it be necessary or an overkill?

I think that the smallest I would ever do an arm bevel is on a concert. Even then I'm not sure what benefit you could get from it because of the way your arm is going to be in contact with a smaller and shallower instrument.

Vespa Bob
02-11-2018, 04:34 AM
Oh, my, that is the closest thing to perfection that I've ever seen! Surely your best up to now?

Bob

Allen
02-11-2018, 08:25 AM
Thanks everyone. Yes, I'm fairly pleased with how this one turned out.

The new finish I'm using it absolutely amazing. So much more gloss than nitro cellulose, thinner and much harder. And full cure overnight. No more waiting for weeks for the solvents to bleed out.

printer2
02-11-2018, 08:50 AM
What are you using, it looks great?

Allen
02-11-2018, 09:49 AM
Its a catalyzed polyurethane. Australian product only available here and New Zealand.

sequoia
02-12-2018, 05:29 PM
Its a catalyzed polyurethane. Australian product only available here and New Zealand.

Interesting stuff. I believe it is also available in the U.S. from Pinnacle and Chemcraft. I don't know much about the stuff and have never used it but it certainly seems to have potential. It comes in pre-catalyzed and post catalyzed forms which I don't understand the difference. It is definitely probably not a finish for the neophyte and takes skill to use. They use the stuff on trains, planes and automobiles...and ukuleles. There are also health issues involved which are not trivial. Follow directions.... A blog post from a pro finisher below:

https://woodfinishings.wordpress.com/2010/12/22/pinnacles-catalyzed-polyurethane/

Allen
02-12-2018, 07:26 PM
There are lots of Polyurethane procudts out there formulated for different uses. You can't expect one designed for spraying planes to be suitable for timber, nor visa versa. And all require more skill to spray than nitro based lacquer. And you better not leave it in the gun like you can with lacquer, or you will be tossing it in the bin.