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dparis007
02-21-2018, 03:33 PM
Hi,

I have bought a beautiful Koaloha long neck concert from a forum member and got it setup by a luthier here in Montreal with a nice and low action both at the nut and saddle.

The strings fitted are Oasis Warm High G fluorocarbon. The intonation is pretty spot on up to the 7th fret but slightly sharp on the 12th fret compared with its harmonic (most evident on the E string). The luthier has proposed to build a compensated saddle to correct the intonation. Thing is, I might try other strings and read from this forum that intonation may change based on string selection.

So here is my question: what type of string (brand and size) do you think I should try instead of the Oasis that would help to correct the slight sharpness on the intonation?

Thanks for your input.

jimavery
02-21-2018, 09:42 PM
I would turn that question around and suggest you decide which strings you want to stay with and then get your luthier to make you a compensated bridge to suit those strings. You'll then have optimised both string selection and setup.

Croaky Keith
02-21-2018, 10:19 PM
I have Living Water fluorocarbon low G concert strings on my Opio L/N concert, great feel & tone. :)

anthonyg
02-21-2018, 10:20 PM
Nominally a more flexible sting is less likely to go sharp and a less flexible string is more likely to go sharp. So, what strings are more flexible than the Oasis strings?

I have NO idea.

Honestly your better off just trying some different string sets to see what you like the sound of and then have the Luthier compensate the saddle to suit the strings you like.

dparis007
02-23-2018, 06:03 PM
Thanks for your suggestions, but I have found a solution to my problem.

The saddle contact point on Koaloha ukuleles is tilted forward and the saddle is about 4/32th of an inch wide. So I just reversed the saddle which then pushed back the contact point of the saddle about 4/32th of an inch and voilą, the intonation is now perfect without having to pay for a compensated saddle.